The Principles And Objectives Of Material Handling

Materials handling is the art and science of moving, packing, storing and protecting of substances in any form until they are brought to further use. Like any other work material handling also works on certain principles and objectives. These have been defined and described in details us under:

  1. Planning Principle: It is imperative to have a definitive plan before executing any work. Hence, the planning principle involves the method and timeline of keeping or moving the material as per demand of the consumer.
  2. Standardization principle: When handling large scale of material handling, maintaining a standard is very important. Customization of material as per need can lead to wastage of the material thus resulting in dead stock. This is why the equipment, software and controls should be standardized in a pattern to provide maximum benefit.
  3. Work Principle: The main objective of using the work principle is to ensure usage of handling equipment for movement of large-scale products is to minimize the load of work on the manual labor without having to compromise on the quality of the material handling.
  4. Ergonomic principle: Ergonomics is the science that seeks to adapt work or working conditions to suit the abilities of the worker. Therefore, the ergonomic principle works on the objective of understanding the limitations of the manual labor and to ensure that maximum work can be extracted without having to put them in jeopardy.
  5. Space Utilization principle: Since one of the prospects of material handling is storing of goods, the space utilization principle is important aspect to be covered. The space is three-dimensional and is calculated in cubic space to adjust the material without breaking it. The placement of material should be effective and efficient so as to keep it intact and make space for other products as well.
  6. Unit Load Principle: While moving and storing the goods it is imperative to know the unit load of the goods so as to ensure that it is appropriately sized and configured in a way which achieves the flow and stock objectives at each stage in the supply chain.
  7. System Principle: The objective of the system principle in material handling entails the movement; storage, protection and packing of the material should all work in a synchronized manner to make sure that the workflow is not hindered.
  8. Environmental Principle: All the machinery required for the accomplishing the task of material handling should be keeping in mind the environment of the storage space. For example energy consumption should be considered as an environmental factor when performing the routine tasks of material handling. Effective usage of energy ensures least wastage.

7 Fascinating and Cool Campfire Facts for Kids

Campfires are the highlight of every summer camp experience and the glow of a warm fire provides the perfect opportunity for kids to enjoy time-honored traditions such as roasting marshmallows and telling ghost stories. Along with the traditional campfire stories, lessons can be learned about science and history that take on new meaning when they are taught outdoors. This season, arm your little camper with a few fascinating facts about campfires that they can share with their fellow camp friends.

1. Campfires Reach Extreme Temperatures

While everyone knows that fire is hot, campers are often surprised at the extreme temperatures a campfire can reach. It only takes a few hours for a campfire to reach 900 degrees Fahrenheit, which is hot enough to melt lead.

2. Coals Continue to Burn Underground

Many people bury their fire when they are done out of the belief that it will snuff out the flames. However, hot coals left beneath the ground can continue to smolder. If they are near tree roots or other flammable materials, then they can reignite and cause a forest fire. Coals can burn underground for an extremely long time. In Australia, Burning Mountain contains underground coal that has been smoldering for over 6,000 years.

3. Campfires Have a Long History

Evidence of what is believed to be the first-known fire has been discovered in Swartkrans, South Africa. There, charred antelope bones suggest that humans were cooking their meat over a fire as far back as 1.9 million years ago. Interestingly, it appears as though dried grass and leaves were used as kindling rather than wood.

4. A Campfire Has Many Purposes

Although campfires tend to be viewed as a gathering place for socializing, they have multiple purposes. For example, a fire can be built to signal for help when a person is lost in the woods. It can also be used to dry clothing, deter wildlife and burn refuse when there is not a trash receptacle available.

5. Netherlands Holds the Record for World’s Largest Bonfire

There are many different ways to build a campfire and some people take pride in building the best. The world’s biggest campfire had an overall volume of 151,288 ft³. It was lit on New Year’s Even in 2014 and burned for a total of five days.

6. Campfires are Color Coded

Those dancing, colorful flames are more than just fun to watch since the colors can tell you a lot about the temperature of the fire. The red light emitted comes from the cooler parts of the fire, and the bluish-white flames signal where the highest heat exists.

7. Most Wildfires Are Due to Human Error

Humans start approximately nine out of ten wildfires and campfires are the biggest culprits. For this reason, it is best to use existing fire rings when they are available and always make sure a fire is completely extinguished before leaving the site.

Using a campfire for warmth, food and survival is a tradition that dates back to …

Why It’s Probably Not Worth Going to University Any More

I’ve been thinking recently, if I was a fresh-faced 18-year-old just out of college with my whole life ahead of me and pondering what to do next, would I go to university? The answer is probably not!

Before I explain, I must insert a disclaimer here that this does not mean that I don’t recommend anyone else to, neither does it rule out me sending my future kids to university. However, as a university graduate of 2004, the more I think about going to university today, the more I find myself wondering what exactly is the point?

My first issue with this age-old institution is the very modern practice of excessively high university fees.

A tax on knowledge?

As of next year, university tuition fees will be rising to a maximum of £9,000 which doesn’t include living expenses, cost of books, and all the other associated costs of student life – it is no wonder the latest UCAS figures show the biggest fall in university applications in more than 30 years!

How it is justifiable to fine, sorry charge, people whopping amounts to educate themselves is completely beyond me. Surely this is some kind of stealth tax on knowledge? From the parent perspective, I can imagine how massive a financial burden this must be, especially where there is more than one university-ready child in the household. These ludicrous fees may well see the UK go down the same route as China in future by adopting a one child policy to keep things affordable.

Forget uni, try YouTube instead!

The second reason I’m somewhat anti-university for now is that thanks to the internet, the world of learning has opened up in so many different and exciting ways that you can pretty much teach yourself anything you want by simply watching YouTube or scouring the pages of Google.

Unlike the somewhat restricted curriculum of a university module, self-taught subjects can be as varied as you like and as long or short as you like, and the best part is most of these online resources are free or low cost so you can save your university fees for your mortgage down payment instead. Also this way, you get to teach yourself subjects that actually affect your day-to-day life such as how to plan and achieve goals, manage your finances, develop a “winning” mindset and so on…

Branson didn’t go uni… and look where it got him

Entrepreneurship is not for the fainthearted but the truth is that it’s becoming more and more of an attractive option for young people who can’t find a job in today’s climate. It makes sense – if some big boss somewhere won’t give you a job, simply create your own!

Richard Branson didn’t go to university and look where it got him; neither did Ingvar Kamprad – the guy who founded IKEA, Simon Cowell who needs no explanation, and countless other entrepreneurs who are today living their own version of “the dream” without first obtaining letters after their …