Will Cyber School Affect My Chances of a Good College?

“Mom, Dad I’d like to do cyber school next fall.”

Ok, now everyone guess what their first concern was… Bueno!

“How will that affect college?”

Good question! This is another one of those tough questions to answer because there are a bunch of different colleges and cyber schools with different ideologies, standards and opinions.

I first took this question to my school counselor. She let me know that it shouldn’t be a problem for most colleges because I had been a good student before. Then I went to some friends of mine who have been schooled online their entire lives. They told me essentially the same thing. It was very reassuring, but I’ve found in my 16 years of life that it’s best to build a body of knowledge for most things because you will never know when it will come in handy, like face painting or unicycle riding (I haven’t totally mastered the second yet).

Googling this subject found me a lot of sights about cyber colleges. Interesting, but not quite what I am looking for….aha! A site called college confidential has the answer to this question in an article called “Cyber School and College Admissions.”

His overall point is that being schooled online shouldn’t hurt your chances at a good college. Before it was looked on with more skepticism, but now virtual school’s popularity is quickly growing, and gaining respect also. Most colleges today will have a separate page for cyber schooling requirements.

For example, Penn State offers a web page of requirements for home schooled students. Home school students are basically required the same things as kids who go to public schools. Home schooling isn’t the same as cyber schooling, but it is usually grouped in the same categories and looked upon similarly.

Personally I am happy to know that my choice to be in online school will not have a negative effect on colleges, but I am not sure that I will be going to college in a couple years.

I have decided to go into ministry when I am older. I think in my case it would be better if I could gain more experience working with other than going to a college, not that I am ruling out colleges. My biggest gripe with colleges is the insane amount of debt they give you.

So what could I do instead?

Well James Altucher has about 8 alternatives to college. They are to:

1. Start a business

2. Travel the world

3. Create art

4. Make people laugh (teaches how to communicate with people, and can be used for things like writing)

5. Write a book

6. Work in a charity

7. Master a game

8. Master a sport

I can see none of these alternatives being hurt by virtual school. In fact in online school most of these can probably be started during all of the free time that is gained!…

How to Become an Orthodontist in Ontario

Becoming an orthodontist in Ontario requires 10 years of post secondary education.

– 4 year Bachelor of Science

– 4 year Dentistry School

– 2 year Graduate School of Orthodontics

An aspiring orthodontist must first complete a four year Bachelor of Science degree ensuring that all pre-requisite courses for dental school are completed. Individual pre-requisite courses may vary by school but generally include the core sciences including biology, chemistry, physics, physiology, biochemistry and organic chemistry courses. Interested applicants are advised to check individual school websites for requirements as different schools may have different requirements.

After completion (or for some schools, while undertaking) a Bachelor of Science undergraduate degree, an individual may sit for a DAT test (Dental Aptitude Test) administered by the Canadian Dental Association and apply to a School of Dentistry.

Upon admission into a School of Dentistry in Ontario, the student must successfully complete four years of further education which would enable them to become a practicing dentist.

In Ontario, getting acceptance into a School of Dentistry is very competitive. As a result, it’s not uncommon for students to go abroad to the US or UK to peruse their dentistry degrees.

Upon completion of a four year dentistry program, students can choose to apply to the Graduate School of Orthodontics in a Canadian school (ex: University of Western Ontario). This application process is highly selective and only the best candidates are given acceptance into the program which entails a final two years of education.

As you can see, Orthodontists go through many years of education in order to have the qualifications and skills required to treat patients.

List of Canadian Dentistry School for Prospective Students:

– Dalhousie University, Faculty of Dentistry

– McGill University, Faculty of Dentistry

– University of Alberta, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

– University of British Columbia, Faculty of Dentistry

– University of Manitoba, Faculty of Dentistry

– University of Saskatchewan, College of Dentistry

– University of Toronto, Faculty of Dentistry

– University of Western Ontario, School of Dentistry

– Université de Montréal, Faculté de médecine dentaire

– Université Laval, Faculté de médecine dentaire…

Science Fair Project on Testing Drinking Water

You are intelligent enough to know that the purpose of most science fair projects is to teach students how to use scientific methods to solve problems on their own. A science fair project can allow students, parents, and teachers to make new discoveries together. One of those discoveries might be how clean your drinking water is.

Students may expect faucet water to be clean, but is it? A science fair project on testing drinking water can help them learn what is in the water they use. This outline will help them and you conduct a drinking water test.

State Your Hypothesis

A good example might be, “If I test drinking water from different sources, which will I find to be the best for my health?” A poor example would be, “If I drink tap water, what happens?”

Background Research

Learn all that you can about what water may contain. Research the effects of various contaminants, minerals, etc.

Develop a Drinking Water Test

What kind of drinking water test will you use? What kinds of drinking water will you test? Will you buy a kit, or simply order appropriate test materials? How will you collect the water to be sure you do not change its content?

What You Need for Drinking Water Tests

Students will need Colorimetric test strips for many drinking water tests. Kits are available from science fair websites. Water Safe Drinking Water Test is an EPA standardized, laboratory certified simple kit that identifies harmful levels of 8 different common contaminants in water: bacteria, chlorine, lead, nitrates, nitrites, pesticides, pH, and water hardness.

Predict Results

Write out a prediction of what you expect. Will your city tap water be the best water for your health? Should your family pay money to drink only bottled water? What do you predict your drinking water test will reveal?

Conduct Your Drinking Water Test

Students may choose from many drinking water tests. Here are a few possible tests. Younger students may want to use only one. Older students may combine a series of drinking water tests.

1. Basic: A basic drinking water test might allow students to test water for alkalinity, chlorine (both free and total), nitrate and nitrite, pH, and water hardness. What is the basic make-up of your water?

2. Bacteria: Along with a basic drinking water test, you might test for bacteria in the water. Water from a drinking fountain may show bacteria that collect on the bubbler and wash into the water.

3. City Water: What is in municipal drinking water? You can use the basic drinking water tests above, but check, too, for metals and sediment. Are corroding pipes contaminating the water?

4. Well Water: Since the government does not test private wells, there may be contaminants in the water taken from them. What might you find? Would you expect more sediment or less? Would your drinking water test be likely to find pesticides if the well is near a farm or garden where they are used?

5. …