Know How To Write A Better Biotech Resume Objective

The purpose of a biotech engineer is to monitor and control the entire operations and production processes. He also inspects and handles the audits. He performs the responsibility of checking the operation and production activities according to some predefined guidelines and norms. For the job description mentioned above, you would need an effective resume objective. An effective and impressive resume objective is already written below. Career objective is the most important part of your resume. It is the short explanation of your personality that informs the recruiter about your career goals. It can leave a long lasting and effective impression on recruiter.

Now I would love to give you an example of resume objective.

Objective: To seek a reputed position in the developing company where I can use my progressive experience and innovative ideas for accomplishing the work projects in the biotech field. I would love to show my knowledge for improving the profit of the biotech organization.

Looking for a great position in a biotechnology field with a fast growing organization where I can use my skills.

I am seeking for a position in the field of biotechnology within a highly esteemed company where I can put my extraordinary efforts like my previous experience, my academic qualification and also my knowledge for the advantage of the company or organization. I am 100 % sure that my additional knowledge and creative skills will help me to take the organization to a higher position in the market.

A job resume objective informs the recruiter about you personality. Without an effective and professional objective, it is much difficult to discuss your skills and abilities. In the resume objective, brief out your complete knowledge in the field of biotechnology with your excellent experience. For example: ‘I want to deal in the field of the agriculture and food processing and many other applicable area like crop production, industrial uses of crops, health care and other products and environmental uses.’

I am having the professional work experience of 7 years in the field of biotechnology involving of DNA module testing and scanning the sample of DNA You can also highlight your achievements as well as accomplishments about a your particular award in order to be successful in this field.

This was all about the biotech resume objectives. These are few essential objectives and you can write one of them in your biotech resume. Read this post very carefully and sincerely. It may help you a lot.…

Writing a Child Story: 8 Elements to Consider

While writing an entertaining child story is obviously more art than science, most successful child stories pay attention to the following 8 elements.

#1: Theme

A good child story has an underlying theme. The underlying theme of “Peter and the Wolf,” for example, is “don’t tell lies” or “be honest.” The underlying theme of “The Sneetches” by Dr. Seuss is “don’t be racist” or “all (Sneetches) are created equal.” A theme can be the moral of the story, or an insight or viewpoint that the story conveys. Common themes are courage, love, perseverance, friendship, etc.

As an underlying theme, the theme usually emerges subtly as the story unfolds. A direct statement of the theme usually comes across as preachy and uninteresting. Remember what your high school English teacher used to say: “show, don’t tell!”

Also, keep your theme positive and constructive. Your story may be sad, but make sure it’s not negative, cynical or depressing!

#2: Plot and Pace

Plot is what happens in a story. Pace is the speed at which the story develops.

Generally, a simple chronological unfolding of events works best for storybooks (no flashbacks or complicated jumping around in time).

The plot usually revolves around a dominant problem or conflict which the main character must resolve. The problem or conflict may be with another character, with circumstances or even internal to the main character (e.g. overcoming their own fears).

The plot usually proceeds through phases: beginning of the conflict, initial success or difficulties, further difficulties or reversals, final resolution or victory, and outcome. As the story progresses through these phases the conflict becomes more intense and increases the dramatic tension, until it the story climaxes and the conflict is resolved.

For the most part, the main character succeeds or fails through his or her own efforts. In fact, it is through this process that the character learns or grows, and this lesson or growth typically conveys the theme.

TIP: Create a thumbnail layout/mockup of your text. This way you’ll be able to better judge how your story unfolds and its optimal pacing.

Proper pacing of your story is essential. Too slow and the reader/listener will lose interest, too fast and they won’t have time to get excited or they will miss important details.

The pace in storybooks should be fairly brisk without “rushing.” Avoid lengthy introductions or descriptions of the setting. Start the action immediately from the beginning and bring the story promptly to a close at the end.

Even more so than adults, children appreciate action. So, keep the pace of your story fairly quick by using action and unfolding events. Don’t get bogged down in lengthy descriptions or reflections. Again, “show, don’t tell!”

#3: Narrative Voice and Point of View

Narrative voice is the viewpoint from which the story is told. Most stories are told either in the “first person” (from the perspective of “I”, “I did this”) or “third person” (from the perspective of “They”, “They did that”). If you choose to write …

A Career in Healthcare Management – A Day in the Life of a Practice Administrator

Your day might not be anything like what I’ve described below, but the point of the post is to suggest that most administrators put out fires all day long and juggle meetings, email, and employee and physician issues and have very little time for planning and thinking. Depending on how long you’ve been with your current group, how well trained your staff are, and how many supervisors you have working with you, you might have a much easier day than described below, or a much harder one!

7:00 – 8:00 a.m.

An employee calls you at home before 7 a.m. to say they will not be in. You check the schedule to see how staff can be re-arranged to cover all needs.

8:00 – 9:00 a.m.

As you arrive, two employees have been waiting for you and have things to discuss with you – one wants to reschedule her vacation for the third time and the other wants information on FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act.) You tell the first you’ll look at the schedule and get back to her and hand the second a packet of info on FMLA to review.

You check your schedule and note that Nurse’s Day is coming up soon and you need to make plans to celebrate their day.

You check your email and see that your state listserv has some interesting information that you forward to your billing manager, asking her to look into the issue and tell you if it applies to your practice.

9:00 – 11:00 a.m.

You handle a patient complaint. You round on everyone in the practice, checking to make sure everyone has what they need and checking on their weekends. On your way back to your office, a nurse mentions that the exam rooms are not being cleaned as thoroughly as they should be; you make a mental note to speak with the cleaning company.

Your 9:30 a.m. meeting is with a broker who has some quotes to share with you in anticipation of your June 30 benefits year-end. Your senior physician has asked that the group consider cutting benefits this year if health insurance rates go up again.

You listen to several voice mail messages that came in while you were meeting with the benefits broker. The first is your EMR project manager calling to say your go-live date might need to be changed; please call him back. Another is a payer asking to schedule a chart audit sometime in the next three weeks.

11:00 – 12:00 p.m.

A physician lets you know that she’s using the last of the Rx pads – could you order some more ASAP?

It is payroll week and you spend most of the hour finishing the payroll and checking with the four employees whose payroll record is missing a punch. You send the payroll file out and move money into the payroll account, checking the bank balance and noting the Electronic Funds Transfer that came in since you checked it on Friday.…