Why Choose Community Nursing As a Profession?

Community nurses are very skilled and provide diverse health care specialties in many areas throughout their professional lifespan. Being fully trained and equipped to provide a vast range of healthcare needs anywhere in the community, community nurses can be considered as the Good Samaritans of the society. Community nursing is in demand for sure, but is that the only reason why you should take to this domain?

Here are 4 reasons why you should be a community nurse

– Not many nurses opt for this stream of nursing. In fact, a survey reported only 30% nurses take to this form of nursing, especially when they wish to start their nursing career. This is a direct incentive for all of you who wish to join this form of nursing – Less competition.

– The job role of such a nurse is so different from a RN or a LPN for example. A community nurse primarily works as a part of a multi-disciplinary team, and is equipped to handle any emergency on a community level.

– Higher pay-scales for community nurses – The added responsibility of taking care of nursing needs on a community level brings a rise in the pay-scales of the nurses. On an average, a community nurse earns about 15% more the salary of a top earning RN.

– Being such a nurse, you could be directly involved in addressing some social issues related to health care. For example, you could be a part of the team campaigning for HIV awareness. You could also participate in Anti-Polio vaccination drives. The list is virtually endless but the point is – You can be a social interface with the society.

The reasons to be a community nurse may be sound, but the task in itself is very challenging. Apart from being on top of your role, you always have to think on your foot, as challenges would hit you from all ends. Lady Florence Nightingale probably best defined community nursing and her example lives on for a lot of nurses who wish to take to this form of nursing. With this role, you can be sure of one thing – Apart from tackling the medical issues impacting people, you would also deal with a lot of social issues too.

With most forms of nursing, you would find nurses working behind the scenes, making patient’s stay in the healthcare setting, pleasurable. But in being a community nurse, you would be exposed to a completely different role.…

USC Pharmacy School Application Requirements and Tips From an Accepted Student

I will begin with the statistics of the accepted students into the University of Southern California Doctor of Pharmacy program for 2009. 460 students were offered interviews from a pool of over 2000 applicants. 240 students are accepted (11 students from out-of-state schools), and the expected class size for 2009 is 190. One must note that USC offers their undergraduates the opportunity of guaranteed admission as long as they complete their requirements in the TAP program (these students take up a large chunk of seats available for other applicants).

Obtaining a Bachelor’s degree is now a requirement for admission at USC. The minimum GPA requirement is a 3.0 (the average GPA of accepted students is a 3.60). Since USC does not require taking the PCAT, other admission criteria is weighed more heavily (GPA, interview performance, extracurricular activities, personal statements, etc.).

For the application process, it is very important for you to note that the University of Southern California sends out interview invitations on a rolling basis, so it is important that you turn in your PharmCAS application and supplemental application as soon as possible. The deadlines for both are early November, but I highly recommend that you turn both in no latter than early August (I turned in my applications by mid-July, just 1.5 months after the application was made available).

At your interview, you will be asked questions by a current pharmacy school student as well as a faculty member. Think of it more of a conversation where you also ask questions back to both of them. When you first arrive at the interview session, you will be greeted by several current pharmacy students, who do a great job of calming you down prior to your interview. Take this opportunity to ask questions and warm up your oral communication skills. Do not worry to much about the “essay” portion as it is just a test of how well you take notes off of a random article that you read. BE SURE to follow all directions provided to you as it is also a test on how well you pay attention to details.

Here are the pre-requisites for USC’s pharmacy program:

Calculus (for science majors)

Statistics (non-business)

Physics w/lab (science/life science majors- thermodynamics & Electromagnetism recommended)

General Biology w/lab (excludes human anatomy & physiology, botany, and microbiology)

Mammalian Physiology w/lab (human preferred-excludes plant, cell and marine physiology)

Microbiology w/lab (fundamentals of microbiology for science majors)

Molecular or Cell Biology(for science majors-one upper division course)

General Chemistry w/lab (for science majors-include inorganic & qualitative analysis)

Organic Chemistry w/lab (for science majors)

Biochemistry (for science majors one upper division course)

Human Behavior (General Psychology or Introductory Sociology)

Microeconomics

For Internationals (holders of foreign US bachelor’s equivalent):

English (expository writing)

Interpersonal Communications or Public Speaking

For specific course equivalencies from your college, please check the forms available from USC’s website.

The Pharm.D. program at USC is a 4 year program. USC is a private school, and our estimated tuition and cost of living …