Type 2 Diabetes – Heart Function in the Fetus When the Mother Has Gestational Diabetes

Gestational or pregnancy-induced diabetes is a health problem for both mothers and their children. In March of 2017, the medical journal Pediatric Cardiology reported on a study on fetal heart function in Gestational diabetic mothers. Earlier studies have shown heart abnormalities during the third trimester or last three months of the pregnancy. Researchers at Aga Khan University Hospital in Karachi, Pakistan, found abnormalities during the second trimester, or middle three months.

The human heart is composed of four chambers, the left and right atria at the top of the heart, and the left and right ventricle at the bottom of the heart. In adult circulation, blue non-oxygenated blood flows from the right atrium to the right ventricle, from where it travels to the lungs. Picking up oxygen in the lungs, red blood cells turn red and make their way from the lungs to the right atrium. From there blood travels through the mitral valve and into the left ventricle. The left ventricle then pumps the blood on to the rest of the body.

In the fetus things are different. Blood picks up oxygen from the mother’s placenta and carries it to the right atrium. From the right atrium, the red blood goes directly to the left atrium and on to the left ventricle, bypassing the lungs entirely.

The investigators compared fetal hearts in mothers with Gestational diabetes at 19 to 24 weeks with fetal hearts in non-diabetic mothers…

  • hearts in the diabetic group showed differences in the amount of time they stayed empty before filling and the amount of time they took to contract.
  • another abnormality related to the valve between the left atrium and left ventricle could indicate an abnormal function of the left ventricle.

It is important for enough oxygenated blood to go to the brain of the fetus and all the other organs for growth and development. Checking on fetal hearts during early Gestational diabetes could one day become a clinical test to learn whether future interventions might be helpful.

For now, heart conditions linked with Gestational diabetes are one more reason to prevent or control pregnant mothers developing this form of diabetes. Ways of preventing Gestational diabetes include…

  • achieving and maintaining normal weight before conception,
  • eating healthful foods such as fruits and vegetables,
  • gaining only the recommended amount of weight, and
  • getting regular exercise

Mothers should be concerned about the possibility of developing diabetes during their pregnancy. The following put women at high risk…

  • being overweight or obese,
  • having a history of high blood sugar before the pregnancy,
  • having a family history of Type 2 diabetes,
  • leading a sedentary lifestyle, and
  • being a member of the Black or Asian race.

Low Self Esteem Can Affect Your Work and Career

Have you ever noticed that the people who have successful careers also have a healthy (or even overblown) sense of themselves and their abilities? The ability to see the great things you bring to your job and being strong enough to stand up for what you believe are essential to on-the-job success.

Those who exhibit extremely meek and mild personalities naturally fall into the background. While they may in reality be more qualified and capable of doing the job, they aren’t the ones who command the respect and authority necessary for those big promotions. Strong personalities exude strength and power and tend to be the ones chosen to lead in the workforce.

So, if you are struggling to move to the next level at work, you may want to take a good hard look at your level of self esteem and whether or not it may be harming your chances of advancement by not allowing your co-workers and superiors to see the wonderful asset you are to the company.

Watch for these career busters:

Lack of Confidence.

A lack of confidence in yourself can carry over in the way others view your ability to take over a project and make sure it is completed on time, on budget and with the creativity and attention it deserves. Until you can show a sincere belief in yourself, how can you expect others to believe in you?

Lack of Control.

People who don’t have confidence in themselves often lack the control to get others to do what they need to. Those in superior positions at work have to have the power to be able to get people moving in order to get the job done.

An Inability to Take Responsibility.

Those with little self esteem often find it difficult to accept even minimal criticism or suggestions and may exhibit an inability to accept responsibility for things that have gone wrong (often placing blame on others around them), and the willingness or aptitude to tackle problems that may arise.

An Inability To Try New Things.

Being a supervisor of people and projects requires a certain sense of adventure. Those who are stuck doing everything the same old way years after year out of fear of rejection often find sales sluggish and clients unhappy.

Job-Hopping.

One way to ensure that you won’t move up in a company is to leave before you even have a chance at a promotion. People with low self-esteem are restless and often view their current job as a stepping stone to the next one, but never really stay long enough to make a real impression.

A Lack of Intimacy.

While office romances should be discouraged, you do need to be able to connect with the people you work with on a personal note to be able to move forward. Good supervisors get to know the people below them and take the time to understand what personal issues may be affecting their job performance. People with low self-esteem are uncomfortable forming …