The 8 Basic Punches Of Western Boxing

The sport of western boxing has had a lot of fans since the early days of the late 19th century in America. Even when organized public fighting matches were still considered a crime punishable by time in jail and a fine they drew a horde of spectators. But then again, who doesn’t love a good fight?

Fighting way back then looked a whole lot different than fighting currently does. Over the years more science and research has been done, into human movement and fitness. The upright postures with hands held low that make early boxing easy to identify have been changed over the years.

In the 21st century, fighters appear more fluid, more aggressive, and in a crouched stance. Legs bent, body weight forward on toes. Unlike the fighters of yesteryear, today, a fighter today uses his hands as well as shoulders to obscure and protect that path that leads right to the “kisser”, or “button”.

The fighters main weapons continue to be his hands, while they also use a lot of holding, pushing, and leaning on strategies to wear down their opponent. With those weapons, there is generally an arsenal of 8 specific punches that a good fighter will develop. From these eight punches there is an incredible array of “combinations” that can be thrown as he tries to get past the defenses of the opponent in the opposite corner.

This list is a brief description of those 8 punches of boxing:

  1. “The Jab”. This punch is thrown from the lead hand. It’s quick, sometimes powerful and is used either to “keep your opponent off of you”, or to judge his distance while setting up a power punch.
  2. “The Cross”. This punch is from the rear hand and is a straight power punch. Usually used as a counter when your opponent throws a punch from the opposite side.
  3. “The Hook To The Jaw”. This punch comes from the lead hand from the side while keeping your elbow bent. The object is to come around the defense and connect with the side of the opponents face. The hook carries a lot of knock out power.
  4. “Rear Hand Hook”. Similar to the previous, because this punch comes from the rear, it’s generally used as a counter punch when your opponent has “left himself open”. The target could be the head as well as the body.
  5. “Lead Hook To the Body”. Again, from the lead hand “hooking” into the body. The target is mostly the ribs or kidney. This particular punch is so devastating that it, when landing successfully, has ended many, many fights with opponent still conscious.
  6. “The Overhand Punch”. This punch is a power punch also. It comes from the rear hand. It’s similar to the cross, however, it has a slight arcing motion to it. The purpose of this punch is go over the opponents targeting the face of the opponent. Imagine a baseball pitcher’s form and you’ll have the basic concept.
  7. “Lead Hand Uppercut”. The uppercut is used

Cultural Education Via Cultural Symbols for Interior and Exterior Decorations of Public Buildings

The cultures of people have great potentials in inculcating values and norms into its members. These values and norms disseminated through cultural education help in fostering good living relations among society members. In most cultures of the world, special cultural symbols are normally used for educating the norms and values of one’s culture. Good behavioral traits such as humility, hospitality, honesty, hard work, and respect are extolled in the symbolic and philosophical meanings enshrined in these cultural symbols. For example, in Ghana, the Adinkra symbols are culturally charged designs that illustrate the accepted values and norms in the Ghanaian community. These culture oriented symbols must be used for decorating the interiors and exteriors of public buildings like community centers, libraries, banks, hotels, restaurants and so forth. This would heighten the cultural education avenues in Ghana.

The culture-oriented symbols like Adinkra symbols offer powerful counsel and practical insight into life. It provides moral instruction to the people. For instance, the Gye-Nyame (Except God) symbol educates us on the pivotal role of God in the life of man. Thus, living in harmony with His virtues results in a successful life. Also, the Nkyinkyim (curves) symbol indicates that life is not a smooth path. It is full of ups and downs, hopes and disappointments. Thus, it offers the practical advice that one needs to be versatile in life as well as adapt to changing situations and circumstances. These and many other cultural symbols impart practical knowledge to challenging situations in life and thus must be made readily available in public buildings as forms of decorations.

Many people visit various public structures to attend to their diverse needs. For instance, many students go to various public libraries to read and undertake various research activities. Numerous families and friends visit restaurants and hotels for relaxation and recreational purposes. A critical look at the designs that are found in the interiors and exteriors of public buildings, especially in Ghana show designs that are appreciated only for their aesthetic appeal. These are normally interplay of elements of design such as lines, shapes, colors and many others that do not hold any symbolic significance. They also do not impart any cultural education to the numerous people who troop in and out of the public buildings. Thus, symbols that impart cultural knowledge of societies must be used as substitutes for these often meaningless decorations on public buildings. If the public buildings are decorated with culture-oriented symbols with brief philosophical meanings written beneath them, the attendees would be able to tap indirectly, cultural education via the cultural symbols. This would ensure the promotion and preservation of the rich, time-tested and applicable values and norms embedded in these cultural symbols.…