How to Plan Your Degree In-line With Your Career Path

Earn a degree is the largest and the most important investment for many people, choosing the right degree will secure for a brighter future. But, it sometimes can be difficult to choose a degree, as there are so many options and so much information to consider. Here are some tips to help you to decide the degree of your interest which in-line with your future career path.

Consider your interests.

You may be interested in pursuing an arts degree but because you believe in the myth of a Bachelor of Arts degree is not enough to find a well-paying job. Whereas, science and technology related degree has a better career path, so you put along your degree of interest and force yourself to take a science and technology related degree. If you do this, you will find it harder to complete your degree and may give up the degree in half way or even if you have successfully earned the degree, you may find it harder to succeed in a career at a dislike working fields.

Here, in the process of choosing what degree to pursue, you need to take into consideration of you interest. Sit down and carefully think of your future career which you are interested to build after your graduation, and from there, gather the information of the related degrees.

Set Your Career Goal

You need to have a clear understanding of what you want to do with your career and how learning a graduate degree will help you reach that goal. If you go to graduate school without a clear goal, you will probably end up wasting both time and money. You will have a better idea on your career goal by spending some time working on some self-assessment and career planning.

Then, gather the information about the degree requirements for the jobs, you can get the job requirement information from many of the job sites like AllStarJobs.com. Once you have degree requirement of you career of interest, then start to search for the related degree programs and shortlist the degrees of your interest for getting further information from universities or colleges who offer these degrees.

Decide Your Mode of Study

While knowledge on your field of interest is the key successor of you future career, experience of the related field play an important role in helping you to set your career path correctly. You may want to consider earn your degree online while getting your working experience in your field of interest.

Today, online degree programs are increasing in popularity and creditability, more and more prestigious colleges and universities offer complete online degree programs taught by the same faculty who teach in their classrooms. The online degree programs is able to provide you with a convenience and flexible learning environment where you can complete your degree at your own planned schedule with the restriction of geography location. Here, you can utilize this advantage to gain your working experience while pursuing your degree online.

In Summary

Job Search Stalled? 5 Ways to Keep Your References From Killing Your Career

You're changing jobs. You know you'll need references for your next career move. You've done a great job so you should not worry about getting a reference – right?

Wrong.

References can sabotage even the most sophisticated, well-executed job search. Sometimes you can lose an opportunity when your reference thinks he's helping you out 100%.

Here are 5 ways to make your references work for you, not against you.

(1) Skip the 'To Whom It May Concern' letters.

Clients often tell me their well-meaning bosses offered to write a 'To Whom It May Concern' letter on your behalf. These letters used to be common 20 or 30 years ago.

Today, corporate employers rarely pay attention to these letters. In fact, often hiring managers will be skeptical about any written correspondence.

Let's face it: employers tend to be conscious of lawsuits. They prefer phone calls that are not recorded. When they need a letter, they supply their own forms and they prefer letters sent directly to them.

You will find exceptions in some industries. For example, university professors and administrators typically submit three letters of reference with each application. Often these references will be delivered directly to the hiring department.

(2) Research the way your present boss answers a request: "Can you supply a reference for John?"

Ask fellow employees about their experiences. You might even get a friend to call on your behalf or hire a reference checking service. Expect surprises.

Some well-meaning managers avoid giving anyone a glowing recommendation. 'Nobody is that great,' they say. 'I want to be honest.'

But of course everyone else exaggerates and your reference's well-intentioned honesty will place you at a disadvantage.

Other references are just clueless. My college 'Nick' genially wanted me to get a great opportunity when he wrote a letter for me. But he added a line suggesting I might be 'something eccentric.' I was applying for administrative positions in universities, which tend to be fairly conservative.

I had no idea what was going on and wondered why I was not getting more invitations to interview. One day an interview committee member asked me, 'What on earth does he mean?'

'We are friends,' I said, truthfully, and reached for the phone.

Nick was completely baffled ('I mean it as a compliment') but he agreed to revise his letters so I would sound like the well qualified, experienced, and highly professional candidate I was.

(2) Before supplying names, obtain permission (and be sure they are still available).

You come to the moment of truth in your job search. Your future boss says, 'I am impressed with what I've seen. May I call a few references? '

To prepare for this moment, get permission to give out names. And take the extra step: Find out what happens next.

Your boss may be required to refer all calls to Human Resources. Or she may be moving to a new career and you are part of the past she wants to forget.

When I taught …