Online Education – A Haven For Cheating?

Online degrees and distance learning are increasing in popularity. Easier accessibility for a growing range of subjects, as well as recent government calls for a push in e-learning, highlight the fact that more and more students will be studying from home in the future and partaking in this more economic and ecological method of higher education. But does being away from the watchful eye of teachers and teachers mean that there is an increased risk of cheating among students? And what are the measures to stop it?

In their article, Probing for Plagiarism in the Virtual Classroom, Lindsey Hamlin and William Ryan discuss the notion of plagiarism, passing off another persons work as one's own, in the context of online education. They describe how e-learning does not seem to make plagiarism any more tempting or easier for students to carry out in comparison to traditional learning, and suggest that this is an age old problem of education generally that can be stopped by any relative institution implementing the correct measures. They also offer details of anti-plagiarism software specifically for online education institutions.

Neil Rowe continued this discussion in his article, Cheating in Online Student Assessment, by offering his argument that other forms of online cheating need to be monitored from plagiarism. The notion of students being able to receive answers before completing online exams is Rowe's first worry. With students not being tested simultaneously, Rowe identifies that a method to prevent this would be for institutions to write enough random questions to ensure a suitable ratio between number of questions and number of students, in order to minimize the chances that two students will receive the same questions.

Rowe also highlights the opportunities that students, if unhappy with their performance during an online test, may be able to start again (after conference with external sources) by claiming that they are experiencing connection problems and have lost their answers. Similarly, he also expresses his biggest concern as relating to what exactly is answering the questions during an online test and the possibility that bright students may complete the tests of less capable students, or at least be called upon for help.

Rowe cites GJ Cizek for countermeasures against online education cheating. Cizek suggests promoting and teaching the value of honesty above simply employing measures to stop cheating when it happens. One such idea: 'Students could be asked to read and sign a policy statement like an honor code or integrity policy at the beginning of the course', seems an effective starting point, alongside minimizing the temptation for students to cheat by giving them overly easy Egypt overly difficult exams. …

Image Admissions Counselor: Conquering College Admissions in Today's Economic Climate

The college admissions process mainly begins with the afternoon of high school and for most students and parents it is an unknown territory even if one of the parents had attended college. Time has changed and the process has changed over the years. Students and parents will need some guidance in doing college search, college application and navigating the college financial aid mind field. Depending on the type of high school / private school a student is attending, the level of guidance and information available varies a great deal. Most public high schools / private high schools have counselors / college adviser that can provide you with the basic guidance and information to get you started, but they have not visited numerous colleges and universities to have extensive information in college admissions and financial aid to take you step-by-step through this overwhelming process.

Regardless of these counselors / advisers have in-depth information on college admissions and college financial aid is a question that you as a student and as a parent have to ask or assess. Most counselers / advisers have not traveled extensively to visit colleges / universities to gather information from them about their recommendations, financial aid programs and the personality of each campus to better help you. This process is not part of the education that a counselor / adviser receives in their masters program. Only through visiting numerous campuses can a counselor / adviser gain the necessary information to help you through this complex process of college admissions.

Should you hire a college admissions consultant? The pros and cons on whether to hire a consultant

The pros of hiring a college admission consultant is that the parents can sit back and let the consultant do all of the work or some of the work. Another benefit of using a consultant is that the consultant can lessen the stress between the students the parents. The college admissions process can be stressful for some families and to have someone from outside the family working with student can be a blessing. Also, the consultants are usually well versed in the whole process of college admissions and they usually have a vast knowledge of colleges and universities across the country. These independent counselors make it a point of visiting many colleges / universities in order to have up-to-date information for the students and parents.

The most note worthy con of hiring an independent college admissions consultant / counselor is that it is going to cost you anywhere from $ 75 to $ 200 an hour. You can hire a consultant to take care the entire college admissions process or you can hire a consultant to take care just the college search and college application process. You can buy a package deal or go a-la-carte.

Another con is that this should be a family affair and by hiring a consultant, you completely take the parents out of the picture. Without, you as the parent have limited time, I suggest you stay …

Reflexive Student Report: First Year As a PhD Student

Introduction

According to Denzin and Lincoln “every text that is created is a self-statement, a bit of autobiography, a statement that carries an individual signature” (1998, p. 184), therefore, in view of this, this reflection is a piece of my autobiography, it is a chapter related to my first year as an MPhil/PhD student. It is also an exercise of reflection towards the challenge to be a reflexive researcher, because I am among those who embrace reflexivity as “the primary methodological vehicle for their inquiry.” (Etherington, 2004, p. 31)

The main purpose of this reflection is to transform my experiences into learning, and I do not know another way to achieve this but by writing. In other words, writing is the only means I am able to reflect upon experiences and learn from them. Additionally, writing is in the heart of my methodological intentions, and was a point of struggles in this first year, as I discuss later. This analysis is also a sort of debriefing exercise, aimed to understand my own actions, and the context that surrounded them.

I divided the analysis into several parts accordingly to the “path” of them. The first part presents my autobiographical account at present on the journey which led me to my research topic and methodological preferences, comprising my early days as a primary teacher and the last years before the beginning of the course. The second part comprises a contrast between my expectations and the reality of becoming a student again. The following section analyses the research training programme, namely its units and the analysis ends with a reflection upon my study.

The autobiographical side of the analysis

Prior to my degree in Education, I finished a formation for primary teachers at a second level, which was then the minimum requirement to have a qualified teacher status in my country. Therefore, I started teaching at the same time that I started university. It was a paradoxical learning experience, because at the same time that the theoretical part was enchanting me, the school reality was a frustrating experience for me both as a human being and as a professional. At those days the behaviourist practices were the leading pedagogy and the practicalities of this in a daily basis almost put me out of the education ground. On the other hand, I started reading the ideas of Paulo Freire and the fundamentals of Vygotsky, which seduced me profoundly. At the end of that first year I decided to work in another school, where the behaviourism was not the law and the Vygotskian thought had a place. Since then, my teacher education at degree level was always accompanied by my teaching experience in a flexible school, which allowed me to be innovative, creative and able to contribute together with other teachers. As part of this process, I was nominated educational supervisor after four years as primary teacher.

During the ten years that I worked as an educational supervisor, coordinating, advising and supporting teachers, I gradually …