Exciting Teaching Tools of Tomorrow

School teachers always wanted to discover ways to connect with their students more effectively for a better learning experience. Thanks to such tools as ClassDojo, teachers can now easily have their students focused in class in no time (rather than spend precious minutes trying to manage students' behavior).

ClassDojo likewise provides students with data on their own behavior, making them less disorderly, leading to a more conducive learning environment. Parents benefit from ClassDojo, too. Teachers can easily access every child's classroom information and show them to the parents and make them engaged in their children's development.

Three Ring is another techie tool for teachers who want to organize their students' data digitally. This app allows teachers to upload student works from your smartphones or laptops directly to your own online stream.

You can use it during instruction inside the classroom, for planning lessons that are needed or will be enjoyed by the students, and for easily assessing the works of each of your students. Students can also see their progress through time through the uploaded pictures in the teachers' stream. This can encourage them to do better in class.

Years of research on early cognitive development has paved way for new tools that will help children develop their cognitive skills. Scientific Learning®'s Fast ForWord Program strengthens children's cognitive skills, helping them improve their reading-related skills such as comprehension, phonological and phonemic awareness, vocabulary, syntax, and grammar, among others.

Fast ForWord also offers English language learning where children can improve on their English literacy rapidly. The program is also consistent in the use of brain exercises for better retention and faster improvement on the use of English language, no matter what your first language may be.

More and more grade school teachers are also excited about custom-designed curriculums which allow the use of apps and devices such as iPads. Elementary schools in several parts of the United States have participated in piloting this kind of programs. For example, students of Jessieville Elementary School in Arkansas used storybook apps for their language arts and science activities. Likewise, students from Van Meter Elementary School managed to create their own ebooks by using several apps and software such as FlipSnack, Evernote, Skitch, and Mackin VIA.

Teachers believe that technology should be used to make education and learning more fun and interesting for children who are exposed to the internet, video games, and devices (such as smartphones, laptops, and tablets) early in their lives. …

Contribution Towards College Expenses Of A Child After A Divorce

As a divorce lawyer, a question I am frequently asked by clients is whether or not their ex-spouse is required to contribute towards their children's education now that the couple is divorced? Most of these clients were divorced when the children were very young and college expenses were simply not contemplated until it was actually time to pay the tuition bill. Unfortunately, many of these divorced clients wait until the day the bill is due to consult a lawyer, but especially if the client plans a little bit in advance, it is likely that the ex-guest will be required to contribute if certain criteria can be satisfied.

Generally the Court considers the unique set of circumstances presented by each case. However, there is a New Jersey Supreme Court case which has set forth guidelines to help determine when a divorced parent is responsible for contributing towards his or her child's education. That case, Newburgh v. Arrigo, 88 NJ 529 (1982), gives twelve factors to be balanced when considering the obligation to pay college expenses: These factors are as follows:

o whether the parent, if still living with the child, would have contributed towards the cost of the requested higher education;

o the effect of the background, values ​​and goals of the parent on the reasonableness of the expectation of the child for higher education;

o the amount of the contribution bought by the child for the cost of higher education;

o the ability of the parent to pay that cost;

o the relationship of the requested contribution to the kind of school or course of study bought by the child;

o the financial resources of both parents;

o the commitment to and aptitude of the child for the requested education;

o the financial resources of the child, including assets owned individually or held in custodianship or trust;

o the ability of the child to earn income during the school year or on vacation;

o the availability of financial aid in the form of college grants and loans;

o the child's relationship to the paying parent, including mutual affection and shared goals, as well as responsiveness to parental advice and guidance; and

o the relationship of the education requested to any prior training and to the overall long-range goals of the child.

No one factor is dispositive and the Court must weigh each of the factors based on the circumstances of each case. For example, if the child has had virtually no contact with the ex-spouse since the child was young, and the ex-spouse had no input in the college selection process, the Court might choose to weigh the child's lack of relationship to the ex -spouse a bit more heavily in light of the other contributing factors on the above list. This scenario is particularly clear when the child chooses to attend an extremely expensive private college, such as Harvard, when the child had the option to attend a less expensive school, such as Rutgers. This is because the New …