Successful Job Hunting – Addressing Gaps in Your Career History

There are lots of reasons as to why an individual may have gaps in the Career History section of their CV (resume). Gaps can occur to allow for travel, further education, volunteering, caring for a child, parent or relative, or following redundancy. Explaining this type of gap on your CV can however be tricky. In fact even CV advisors are not too sure as to how this type of gap should be addressed! There are lots of commercially available CV writing guides, books and fact sheets out there, but the advice they give regarding 'addressing gaps' is conflicting …, and in some instances missing absolutely!

So, what is the best way to address a gap in your career history?

Be Truthful
Ultimately honesty is the only way forward when it comes to compiling your resume. You would not be very happy if your future employer had lied about the salary and development opportunities attached to the job you've just accepted, and in the same way an employer will be less than impressed if they forget a lie or 'cover up 'on your CV that's exposed later down the line. So deliberately concealing or lying about gaps in your career history is a definite 'no no'. And if a potential employer does not notice an unexplained gap when reading your CV, the chances are they will notice it at interview.

Provide an explanation
Research demonstrates that if a recruiter notices a gap in the career history section of a CV but that gap is not explained, they are likely to deduce that the applicable is less honest than the average person. However, if the gap is noticed and is explained, the recruiter is likely to deduce that the applicable is more honest than the average person. Result = do not leave a gap in your career history unexplained; and ensure the explanation reflects on you in as positive a way as possible.

Fill in the gap
During your career gap you will have been doing something! It may be that you were recovering from an illness, or caring for another individual. You may have been studying or traveling, or even actively seeking employment. Alternately you may have been serving a prison sentence or spending time in rehabilitative care – there are endless possibilities. In many ways this is irrelevant. Whilst you must provide an explanation for your career gap, your focus needs to be on the skills that you developed or gained during this break in employment. Skills, abilities and experiences gained outside of the workplace (especially those that clearly refer to the job or industry in which you're seeking employment) are just as valuable as those earned within the workplace. Describe newly formed skills and list achievements gained during this time in exactly the same way as you would if you were discussing a previous role.

Think about the layout
A single gap in your career history can usually be easily addressed to the satisfaction of recruiters by following the …

How To Get Better Grades In College

Ever wondered what on earth can you do to finally pull off a good grade in college? Well that is what the article will be addressing by giving these tips on how to study for a college test.

1. In class, record almost everything, do not wait on what you think is important. The teacher may view something as important which you did not, which puts you at a disadvantage.

2. Attempt tutorials and try to attend as many as possible.

3. The repetition of information and the practice will help your memory and your ability to get closer to that A. Practice your tutorials and past papers before an exam.

4. Exam questions are often similar and are sometimes even recycled. Importantly, you should try to practice answering questions without looking at the notes after you have studied a topic.

5. Review the material as soon as you can and review often. Place an emphasis on understanding and thinking about the material rather than mere recitation

6. Try to pinpoint areas which are stressed during lectures. These are areas which your lecturer views as important and you will more than likely be tested on these areas.

7. Keep handouts organized in a folder so it will waste less time trying to find class material Take a front seat as you will be more focused, less likely to fall sleep and less likely to find people who talk a lot at these positions.

8. Develop your own abbreviations when taking notes. This enables you to save some time and so you can keep up with the lecturer. Be careful, however, not to overdo this.

9. Visualize the material and write down what you need to remember This aids memory as more senses are involved

10. Keep a positive attitude. Visualize getting an excellent grade on your paper. You can make a poster with inspirational quotes, read inspirational stories or you can even listen to positive songs to lift your mood when you feel low. Do whatever you have to do to believe that you will do well on your exam

11. Read information about study skills. Try buying one or borrowing a book from your library or friends.

12. Concentrate during class.Doodling and talking with friends will cause you to lose valuable information and explanations.

13. Time is then wasted by trying to figure concepts which were missed, by reading textbook repeatedly.

14. When you write notes, ensure they are legitimate. Its easier to read and less time is spent trying to figure what it could be.

15. If there is anything you do not understand go to your lecturer for some help

16. Forming study groups can be very useful. Someone else may understand a topic much better than you do and be able to help you understand it, and of course, vice versa. You should be cautious, however, to invite people who are serious about their work and will not waste your time by idling a lot.

17. …