Writing As a Career Builder – What Are the Payoffs?

I've been a professional writer for 35 years and have published 15 books, thousands of articles, and a decade of monthly columns. They've been a great career booster, creating a steady stream of clients and invitations to lecture and speak at conferences.

When I was about to start my third book, an old friend came to town – a highly successful man with a stock portfolio as long as your arm. "Tell me," he asked over the expensive lunch he treated me to, "Writing books – is it cost effective?"

Of course, I laughed (somewhat hysterically), and so did the carefully selected friends I repeated it to. However, the question has stuck with me over the years, and it's one you'll want to ponder if you're thinking of doing a book. The unambiguous answer I've come up with, after years of observing the creative process and its results, is, "yes and no."

If you're talking about direct financial payback, no, it's NOT particularly cost effective. The author generally earns less than a dollar royalty per hard copy sold, except for the ones you sell yourself, and there you get 40% of the cover cost but no royalty. If it's a hard copy book from a publisher, the first payment does not arrive until a year or longer after you complete the hard work of writing the book, unless you get an advance on royalties. With an ebook, you get 100% of the royalties if you are marketing it yourself from your own website, or generally 50% if it is marketed elsewhere.

Writing IS extremely cost-effective in other ways, however. There are the indirect rewards of creative self-fulfillment, the pride of seeing your work in print, the sense of contributing to the field, and the satisfaction of knowing that your ideas are reaching and helping people you'll never meet. If it's a good book, you enjoy increased prestige and respect from your collections and readers.

Not bottom line enough? I have also had many more tangible but indirect rewards, although there's no guarantee that everyone who publishes a book will do as well. Because of my publications, I've been invited to speak at conferences and to lead seminars around the world. There have been five all-fee-paid, one-month trips to Europe, three to Brazil, and a month in Australia. Without the books, none of these groups would have heard of me. A well-received work can be an entree into speaking at conferences. It's not the only way-some of our finest and most popular speakers have yet to write a word and are still invited to speak abroad.

And, no, as my wealthy friend would point out, the trips were not cost-effective either, because of the income lost during those months away. However, the chance to travel and to meet astrology lovers all over the world is a priceless reward. Another indirect benefit has been the clients who came after reading my books-satisfying, astrologically sophisticated, insightful folks who were attracted to my way …

Mike Anderson Bio – Head Basketball Coach of University of Missouri (MU) Tigers Basketball Team

Mike Anderson is best known to most college basketball fans today as the head coach of the men’s basketball team at the University of Missouri which is also commonly referred to as Mizzou or simply MU. Coach Anderson has received praise from supporters of the Columbia, Missouri based college for leading the basketball program to post season NCAA Tournament wins following both the 2008-2009 season and the 2009-2010 basketball season.

In addition to being a proven winner on the basketball court Anderson has won over the hearts of faithful MU Tigers supporters with his consistent commitments of loyalty to the university. In March of 2009 Mike signed a contract extension with MU and in doing so reportedly turned down an even more financially lucrative offer from the University of Georgia of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

In the spring of 2010 a similar concern arose when University of Missouri fans were one again afraid that they might lose their successful basketball coach to poaching efforts by another college. During the 2010 scare the threatening school was the University of Oregon which due in part to the tremendous resources bestowed upon the university by locally based Nike was reportedly offering Coach Anderson a significant salary increase to move to the Pacific Northwest and coach the University of Oregon Ducks in the Pacific 10 (Pac 10) Conference. Coach Anderson chose to politely pass on the offer from the Oregon Ducks and remain committed to the contract extension that he signed with the Missouri Tigers on March 31, 2009.

Long before becoming a hot commodity in the world of Division-I basketball coaches Mike, born in 1959, grew up in Alabama where he was an all-state high school basketball player in his own rite. After high school Anderson played for now well-known basketball coach Nolan Richardson (who eventually won a national championship with the University of Arkansas in 1994) at the University of Tulsa. The duo of Mike Anderson and Coach Richardson won a NIT Championship together in 1981.

After graduating from the University of Tulsa in 1982 Anderson spent three seasons as an assistant coach at his alma mater and when head coach Nolan Richardson moved to the University of Arkansas in 1985 Anderson followed suit and served as an assistant there for 17 years. In 2002 Mike Anderson accepted a head coaching position in the city where he was born at the University of Alabama Birmingham or UAB for short. After four very successful seasons at UAB Anderson accepted the head coaching position at the Big 12 Conference mainstay the University of Missouri where he has been ever since the 2006-2007 season.…