Writing As a Career Builder – What Are the Payoffs?

I've been a professional writer for 35 years and have published 15 books, thousands of articles, and a decade of monthly columns. They've been a great career booster, creating a steady stream of clients and invitations to lecture and speak at conferences.

When I was about to start my third book, an old friend came to town – a highly successful man with a stock portfolio as long as your arm. "Tell me," he asked over the expensive lunch he treated me to, "Writing books – is it cost effective?"

Of course, I laughed (somewhat hysterically), and so did the carefully selected friends I repeated it to. However, the question has stuck with me over the years, and it's one you'll want to ponder if you're thinking of doing a book. The unambiguous answer I've come up with, after years of observing the creative process and its results, is, "yes and no."

If you're talking about direct financial payback, no, it's NOT particularly cost effective. The author generally earns less than a dollar royalty per hard copy sold, except for the ones you sell yourself, and there you get 40% of the cover cost but no royalty. If it's a hard copy book from a publisher, the first payment does not arrive until a year or longer after you complete the hard work of writing the book, unless you get an advance on royalties. With an ebook, you get 100% of the royalties if you are marketing it yourself from your own website, or generally 50% if it is marketed elsewhere.

Writing IS extremely cost-effective in other ways, however. There are the indirect rewards of creative self-fulfillment, the pride of seeing your work in print, the sense of contributing to the field, and the satisfaction of knowing that your ideas are reaching and helping people you'll never meet. If it's a good book, you enjoy increased prestige and respect from your collections and readers.

Not bottom line enough? I have also had many more tangible but indirect rewards, although there's no guarantee that everyone who publishes a book will do as well. Because of my publications, I've been invited to speak at conferences and to lead seminars around the world. There have been five all-fee-paid, one-month trips to Europe, three to Brazil, and a month in Australia. Without the books, none of these groups would have heard of me. A well-received work can be an entree into speaking at conferences. It's not the only way-some of our finest and most popular speakers have yet to write a word and are still invited to speak abroad.

And, no, as my wealthy friend would point out, the trips were not cost-effective either, because of the income lost during those months away. However, the chance to travel and to meet astrology lovers all over the world is a priceless reward. Another indirect benefit has been the clients who came after reading my books-satisfying, astrologically sophisticated, insightful folks who were attracted to my way …

Mike Anderson Bio – Head Basketball Coach of University of Missouri (MU) Tigers Basketball Team

Mike Anderson is best known to most college basketball fans today as the head coach of the men’s basketball team at the University of Missouri which is also commonly referred to as Mizzou or simply MU. Coach Anderson has received praise from supporters of the Columbia, Missouri based college for leading the basketball program to post season NCAA Tournament wins following both the 2008-2009 season and the 2009-2010 basketball season.

In addition to being a proven winner on the basketball court Anderson has won over the hearts of faithful MU Tigers supporters with his consistent commitments of loyalty to the university. In March of 2009 Mike signed a contract extension with MU and in doing so reportedly turned down an even more financially lucrative offer from the University of Georgia of the Southeastern Conference (SEC).

In the spring of 2010 a similar concern arose when University of Missouri fans were one again afraid that they might lose their successful basketball coach to poaching efforts by another college. During the 2010 scare the threatening school was the University of Oregon which due in part to the tremendous resources bestowed upon the university by locally based Nike was reportedly offering Coach Anderson a significant salary increase to move to the Pacific Northwest and coach the University of Oregon Ducks in the Pacific 10 (Pac 10) Conference. Coach Anderson chose to politely pass on the offer from the Oregon Ducks and remain committed to the contract extension that he signed with the Missouri Tigers on March 31, 2009.

Long before becoming a hot commodity in the world of Division-I basketball coaches Mike, born in 1959, grew up in Alabama where he was an all-state high school basketball player in his own rite. After high school Anderson played for now well-known basketball coach Nolan Richardson (who eventually won a national championship with the University of Arkansas in 1994) at the University of Tulsa. The duo of Mike Anderson and Coach Richardson won a NIT Championship together in 1981.

After graduating from the University of Tulsa in 1982 Anderson spent three seasons as an assistant coach at his alma mater and when head coach Nolan Richardson moved to the University of Arkansas in 1985 Anderson followed suit and served as an assistant there for 17 years. In 2002 Mike Anderson accepted a head coaching position in the city where he was born at the University of Alabama Birmingham or UAB for short. After four very successful seasons at UAB Anderson accepted the head coaching position at the Big 12 Conference mainstay the University of Missouri where he has been ever since the 2006-2007 season.…

College Placement Tests

In order to be admitted to many colleges private and public, more than 1 million high school aged students must take a college placement test. Many four year institutions rely on the standardized tests ACT and SAT. Many schools will accept either test, and some schools accept both tests. For schools on the west and east coast, the SAT I is generally accepted, while in the Midwest and central US, the ACT is accepted more.

The ACT test is a general college placement test that covers English, math, reading, science and reasoning skills as well as an optional writing test. The test fee is $32 with an additional $15 for the writing test and takes up to 3 hours and 25 minutes with the writing test. The SAT I is $45 and takes up to 3 hours and 45 minutes, and covers reading and math reasoning as well as writing skills. The SAT II is generally used for a specific area of study and tests on one subject alone. The cost for this test ranges from $29 to $40, and students are given one hour to complete the test. The TOEFL is the equivalent of the SAT test, and is given to those who are not native English speaking persons, to understand and use English. This is an internet based test and is the most common in the US. The fees associated with this test are $150, and for the internet version of the test you are given 4 hours and 40 minutes. If you complete the paper version of the test, you are given 3 hours and 30 minutes for completion.

The average ACT score is a composite score of 21.1, while the verbal average on the SAT I nationwide is 501. The average math score is 515, and the average writing score is 493 across the United States. Many high school juniors are given the PSAT or the preliminary SAT test during school hours. This tests the reading and math skills as well as the writing skills and allows for improvement of these areas before taking the SAT during senior year. The fee for this test is $13, but can be waived for those students who are on waivers or discounted programs, and all are given 2 hours and 10 minutes to complete the tests.

Many 2 year colleges or even community colleges and career institutes require tests that are much like the ACT and SAT I, and some ask that the student at least take one type of college placement test before being admitted. These tests are used to help with placement in courses according to strengths and weaknesses the student has. There are a few tests that are the most commonly used, and these include but are not limited to Accuplacer, ASAP or Academic Skills Assessment Program, COMPASS/ESL, Career Programs Assessment test or CAPt, and Wonderlic. These tests are all given free of charge in most cases on the campus of the college you wish to …

Teaching Kids Financial Responsibility

When you begin at an early age to teach your kids the value of money and the importance of financial responsibility, you are fosting a healthy development that will help them in their future endeavors. It's more important than ever to teach your teen how to be credit card savvy in today's economy. Good credit means a lot and helping your child understand this at a young age will prepare them for when they go off on their own. Here are some tips on how to reveal the importance of financial responsibility and encourage good credit card habits.

Tip 1- Start talking to your teen about what it means to live in the constraints of their financial realities. Discuss the difference between needs and wants since many teens feel the need for instant gratification. Explain that it's more important to live within your means and earn what you spend, as that is the reality for most American families.

Tip 2- Part-Time jobs have been proven to increase a teen's financial literacy, so it's a good idea to encourage a job that will not interfere with education while still providing them with a means of earning money that is all their own. Even if they earn an allowance for you, they should need to perform tasks before they are given any payments. This will help them learn that they need to earn their money, and once they earn it, they typically think twice about what they will spend it on after they see how much work it takes to acquire.

Tip 3. Start them out with a prepaid credit card. Much like a credit card with training wheels, a prepaid credit card will allow a teen to get an understanding of how credit cards are used, and the financial concepts behind them without all of the risks involved with a real credit card. It will also help them learn to track their spending habits and give them valuable lessons on managing their money.

It's so important for the parents to be good role models for their teens. In light of today's current economic crisis, children have been witness to parents' poor spending habits, mortgages that the family can not afford, and a number of individuals with more debt than they can handle. The best thing a parent can do for their children is to set good financial habits for themselves too. In the end, your child will gain invaluable tips and habits from learning early on. …

How Many Calories Do You Burn by Running?

How many calories do you burn by running?

The glib answer is 100 or 110 calories per mile for an average 155 pound runner.

But a group from Syracuse University found that 12 men who ran and walked 1600 meters (approximately 1 mile) on a treadmill, burned an average of 124 calories running and 88 walking; while 12 women who did the same workout burned 105 and 74 calories respectively. Typically women burn less because their lighter bodies require less effort to move them.

If you sat at home watching television instead of exercising, your body would still expend calories. In order to accurately determine the calories burned during an exercise session, deduct your resting rate from the calories burned.

The formula for working out net calories burned per mile while running is to multiply your body weight in pounds by.75. For example, if you weigh 160 pounds and run 2.8 miles then the net calories used would be 160 multiplied by.75 multiplied by 2.8 miles, resulting in 336 net calories burned for this workout.

Below are tables which, depending on whether you run for a length of time or at a certain speed, may be useful.

This table sets out calories burned by 140 and 195 pound people who run for one hour:

Running 5.0 miles per hour (12.0 minute mile) 508 708

Running 5.2 miles per hour (11.5 minute mile) 572 797

Running 6.0 miles per hour (10.0 minute mile) 636 885

Running 6.7 miles per hour (9.0 minute mile) 699 974

Running 7.0 miles per hour (8.5 minute mile) 731 1018

Running 7.5 miles per hour (8.0 minute mile) 795 1107

Running 8.0 miles per hour (7.5 minute mile) 858 1195

Running 8.6 miles per hour (7.0 minute mile) 890 1239

Running 9.0 miles per hour (6.5 minute mile) 953 1328

Running 10 miles per hour (6.0 minute mile) 1017 1416

Running 10.9 miles per hour (5.5 minute mile) 1144 1594

Running up stairs 953 1328

Jogging 445 620

Based on this schedule, if you run for a portion of an hour, multiply your calories by the number of minutes you run and divide by 60. For example if you weigh 140 pounds and run 5 miles per hour, after 25 minutes, you burn 508 multiplied by 25 divided by 60, equalling 211 calories. If the same person ran at the same speed for 1 hour 16 minutes (76 minutes) then 508 multiplied by 76 divided by 60 equals 643 calories.

Below is a weight- and speed-adjusted table detailing the calories burned for 10 minutes of running (if the alignment goes awry, I apologise and suggest pasting it into a spreadsheet):

pounds 12 10 9 8 7 6 5:30 minutes per mile

110 66 83 91 103 116 132 149

120 72 90 100 113 127 144 162

130 78 98 108 122 137 156 176

140 85 106 117 133 149 170 191

150 90 113 124 141 158 180 203

160 97 121 133 152 …

Train for a Career as a Central Service Technician

Patient care inside a hospital is the top priority of all medical professionals. With the correct education from an accredited voluntary school students can become a part of the medical field as a central service technician. The proper procedures to complete career responsibilities are available in two forms.

The most completed form of education is at the certificate level. Students work through a concentrated area of ​​study that trains them to process medical equipment and supplies inside a hospital. Instruction teachers students to fulfill the career's specific duties, which typically includes working with medical equipment to sterilize, process, and decontaminate it before and after surgery. Length of study changes depending on the college students are attending but most require students to complete 300 to 400 classroom hours to graduate. Certificate programs typically comprise clinical hours that have students working directly with other medical professionals and equipment inside a medical facility.

Students that pursue an associate's degree will find that education is extremely similar in regards to central service courses. The difference is the length of study and the courses taken. An associate of applied science is the standard form of education and lasts approximately two years. Students complete all central service courses taken at the certificate level and general education courses. Students that have an associate's degree have more career opportunities.

The different practices of the field are broken down into two main categories. Both levels of education examine general central service skills and infection control knowledge. General technician courses may include:

  • Medical Terminology
  • Cleaning Tools
  • Anatomy
  • Inventory Management
  • Regulations and Standards

These courses are essential to understand the proper procedures required by the healthcare field. Students can expect to follow these courses while examining a technician's role inside the workplace. Some functions learned inside a management course include billing, communication, and quality assurance. These aspects integrated into procedural methods prepare students for a career. Infection control courses may include:

  • Microbiology
  • Disinfection
  • Low and High Temperature Sterilization
  • Decontamination Preparation and Transport

Inside typical infection control courses students are taught to properly handle and disinfect used medical equipment. Training is focused on teaching students the different functions and handling techniques for surgical instruments. A packing and sterilization course teachers students how to assemble supplies and care for instruments. This is explored by working to teach students sterilizing, monitoring, and distribution methods for medical equipment. Procedural based courses are integrated into clinical hours to adequately prepare students to take on all job responsibilities.

Train for a career as a central service technician by finding the right program inside a voluntary college. Accredited certificate and associate's degree programs are available making this career highly accessible. There are numerous agencies like the Accreditation Council for Independent Colleges and Schools ( http://www.acics.org/ ) that can fully accredit quality educational programs. Full accreditation will ensure that students receive the best education possible. Students should enter an online central service training program and begin the learning process to become a medical professional.

DISCLAIMER: Above is a GENERIC …

Start Your Future Career With A Good Computer Training

To almost all business industries, the computer system is the backbone for a lot of companies. In the world of IT or information technology, there are basically two types of network providers: CISCO and Microsoft. Becoming a certified CISCO network associate or a certified Microsoft system associate will surely give you an edge over other IT experts today.

Having such certification means going through intensive computer training. In the United States, the DC area, computer training is one of their best places that offer high quality computer training. In fact computer training in North Virginia is highly recognized nationwide. CISCO and Microsoft certification are available through various computer training centers in North Virginia.

The above mentioned certification courses will surely upgrade anyone's skill and practice you for more complex and advanced computer training courses. Even if you have very little knowledge about advanced IT, rests ensure that these training programs will help you get started. At the end of each course, you will learn how to configure systems, troubleshoot hardware, software even routers and switches. You will learn how to install and uninstall various programs and even how to protect your computer system from the threat of unethical hacker by becoming a hacker yourself.

And since a lot of companies in the United States are dominating its presence in the internet, the work market for IT development and design is booming and is large in demand, not just in the United States but in other parts of the world as well. Getting proper computer training in North Virginia will play a huge role in helping you become a certified IT expert.

Course offered by training centers in North Virginia includes A +, Network +, Security +, CCNA, CISSP, Cisco certification, and Microsoft certification. CEH, CHFI, and ESCA are ethical hacker courses that boomed in popularity in 2001. Demand for Certified Ethical Hackers is continuously soaring up, because a lot of companies have seen the negative effect of unsecured computer network to their business reputation. Large companies are willing to shed off large sum of money for high quality CEH, to work on their computer system's safety and security.

CEH courses are offered in computer training in North Virginia. In fact, this is where computer training in North Virginia dominates the other computer centers nationwide, for they can produce highly qualified CEH more than any other schools outside the state. And their student's achievements are highly recognized, giving credits to the school or training centers that they came from.

CompTIA A + certification on the other hand has been around for many years now but because the world of technology is ever changing, the certification varies as well, but without changing the foundation of the certification tests. This tactic ensures that only those who have studied well or the right people with sufficient knowledge about both computer hardware and software and those who can build it, would get recognition. Like with everything else in this world, where you came from, serves …