How to Prepare for College in High School – Are You Doing It Wrong?

Many students across the country, as well as parents, are unclear on how to properly prepare for college in high school. Whether it’s course selection, grades, test scores or extracurricular involvement, all the things that you do during those 4 years has an impact on your future as it pertains to college.

In fact, many families are misguided and given outdated information as to what colleges look for in prospective students. College admissions is an ever-changing thing, so each year should be treated differently depending on what school(s) you are looking to attend.

So with that, let’s take a look at a few of the most important factors to help you best prepare for college in high school.

Grades and Test Scores

The first, and most obvious factor are your grades and test scores. Specifically, they will be looking at your grade point average (or GPA), Class Rank, and ACT/SAT test scores.

A combination of those 3 factors is usually used by the college admission reps to determine if you’ve met their academic requirements for admission. If you are on the borderline, they will look further into your background to see if there is anything else they need to consider before accepting or denying you. But what are those “other” factors?

Extracurricular Involvement

Yes. In addition to your academic record and classroom tendencies, colleges want to see involvement in clubs, activities and/or sports. This shows that you are a well-rounded student who is willing and able to take on more than just schoolwork. You also display your time management skills by participating in clubs or sports, and colleges love these type of students!

As an insider’s tip: If you are trying to help out your chances for admission by joining a club, make sure that you take on some sort of leadership role in that activity. While college admission reps like to see involvement, they are really looking for leaders, and what better way to show them but by being President, Vice President or Treasurer in that club?

High School Coursework

Different than grades and test scores, high school coursework is basically the level of classes you took in high school. For instance, did you enroll in a regular, college-prep level class when there is an Honors or Advanced Placement (AP) level available?

Colleges are looking for students who challenge themselves with upper level courses, especially the elite and highly selective schools! If you are able to achieve A’s and B’s in regular level classes, that’s great! But, the college admissions reps want to see higher level achievement, so make sure you’re challenging yourself in your coursework.

A word to the wise: Don’t bite off more than you can chew with Honors and AP courses. Colleges like these, but they’d rather not see a C on your transcript. So, make sure you know exactly what you’re getting yourself into if you opt for the higher level classes.

This is just the tip of the iceberg when talking about how to …

Why Not Real Estate Appraisal As A Career?

A lot of my friends have been bugging me laTely, about writing an article that lets people know how great it is to be an appraiser. Knowing me they know I love to write blogs, and since I am an appraiser, they are surprised I do not write a whole lot about it. Not even sure why it never dawned on my before, I'm going to start. The industry is changing as a result of the turmoil in the housing market.

The powers that are being ratcheting up requirements. In every state, not just a single state. They are trying to standardize licensing, testing, etc. Any time an industry goes through such a radical change there is a big turn over in the professional population, and this is no different. There is a percentage of people out there who just feel that they past the time to keep up on the higher educational requirements – and chose to retire. There is already a pending crisis shortage of commercial appraisers, and residential appraisers will soon follow.

The timing couldnt be better – if you are looking for your first career, or changing careers. Or even if you would consider changing careers because you need flexibility.

The problem is, when you come across a legitimate offer out there, that can change your life, you're so used to hearing all the "static" from work at home jobs that you dont believe it. Yes it sounds too good to be true that you can be your own boss and make $ 100,000 a year.

The catch is that its real, so it takes some REAL work. Another catch is that its better you've already invested in your formal education up to the point you have some college degree of some sort. You need to take some evaluation specific classes, but having gone through the process – its definitely worth the effort. The most important thing is – the pay off is way out of proportion to the costs.

I got lucky, and had a friend in the business that walked me through the process. If I didnt have that, I might not be an appraiser now.

I did search the internet at the time but didnt really find much about how to get into the industry. But now there is a place that does just that: Helps you get into the industry, tells you how to find a job, what classes to take, etc.

Its ResidentialAppraiser.biz so if you're thinking about it, you should visit them – the requirements go up in January 2008! …

The 5 Worst Reasons To Earn An Online College Degree

There are some excellent reasons that you might want to earn an online college degree. There are also some terrible ones, and if you have any of these in the back of your mind, it’s time to think again.

Reason 1: I’m very shy & quiet; if I get my degree online I won’t have to interact with people.

While it’s true that studying for an online degree involves less face-to-face contact with fellow-students, or teachers, it’s a myth that no interaction is required. Particularly for a bachelor’s degree, where you’ll be taking a wider range of courses and spending less time on individual in-depth projects, most of your classes will involve very real interaction.

Since you’ll be studying online, that interaction takes different forms. Whether it’s through email lists; virtual classroom software; bulletin boards; social networking; or forums; distance learning is likely to require you to take an active role in debate and discussion. You may be sitting alone in your room, but in a very real sense you’ll be surrounded by students. Their ideas and questions will enrich your education — and their education will be similarly enriched by yours.

Reason 2: It’ll be easy, because I don’t have to go to class.

You certainly don’t have to fly out of bed; run a comb through your hair, throw clothes on; and dash out the house to the bus stop in order to make that 8:00 am Intro to Statistics class. For which, incidentally, you should be very grateful. However, many of your classes will involve regularly scheduled lectures and seminars which you’ll be required to attend.

It’s true that, unlike online courses a decade or so ago, you may be able to review those lectures at a time that’s convenient to you. This flexibility, known as asynchronous learning, allows you to schedule your time more efficiently and is one of the great benefits of distance education. But this flexibility also demands self-discipline. You’ll still be responsible for completing the material and there are likely to be regular assignments designed to keep your progress on track; the college doesn’t want you to fall behind.

Reason 3: I’m a computer expert, so learning online will be simple.

A thorough knowledge of computers is helpful in almost any field and it certainly won’t hurt your online studies, particularly if you’re focusing on technology or programming. But you do not need to be a computer whiz to earn an online college degree. If you are comfortable browsing the Web; sending email; writing and saving a document; and chatting via instant messenger; you’ll be quite capable of completing any of your online courses.

Online schools realize that in order for their students to succeed, and to continue their studies, the user experience must be pleasant. Frustration will lead to students dropping out, so most programs offer extensive support; online tutors who can walk you through software; 24 hour help desks, and more.

Reason 4: It’ll be quicker to earn my degree online.