Girls Basketball College Selection Tips I

When you are being recruiting by several college coaches, it can get confusing on what school you would like to attend. It may get to a point were each coach is saying the same thing about their school. To help you narrow your focus on which school to sign a basketball scholarship with, consider these two areas.

School Location

School location is an important factor to consider. Do you want to stay close to home or would you like to go away? If you go away from home, consider travel arrangements for you to get back and forth during breaks and travel arrangements for your family to visit. Or are their relatives in the city where the school is located. Keep in mind different regions have different climates of weather. If you live in a mild climate area, you can handle being in an area where the climate is not as mild.

Academic Programs

Although you have the opportunity to play basketball on the college level, your main goal is to get a degree. If you already know what type of degree you would like to obtain, make sure the school you select has the program. Sometimes coming out of high school, you are not certain what you would like to major in. This is ok. Just make sure you are familiar with the different majors and minors offered at the school.

School location and academic programs are just two areas to look at while considering colleges to sign a letter of intent to play basketball for. However they are important. …

Bachelor Degree – BA Vs. BS

There are a lot of people who wonder why some bachelor degrees, when you get them, designate you as a bachelor of arts and other bachelor degrees designate you as a bachelor of science. Well, the answer is very simple.

A Bachelor of Arts degree goes to somebody who gets a bachelor degree in any non-technical, or science related field. A Bachelor of Science degree goes to somebody who does get a degree in a science related field. The designations are set up by the colleges themselves.

So, what’s the difference? Does it really matter?

The answer to that question may shock you. It matters very much.

The reasons will not be immediately apparent to the student, but when he or she goes into the real world to get a job, they are going to be in for a rude awakening if they’re looking for a specific type of job and don’t have a bachelor of science degree.

If you’re scratching your head wondering why this even matters, the answer is as follows. Most Bachelor of Science programs are a little more intense than a Bachelor of Arts program. In other words, in addition to the degree having to be in a science related field, the degree itself will contain more required courses than a Bachelor of Arts degree. Of course this varies from college to college, but within each school the bachelor of science program is always more intense than the bachelor of arts program. There may be one more required course per semester, or more science courses required. The bottom line translation is, the program is harder to get through; in some cases, a lot harder.

So why does this matter? Well, there are certain jobs, such as in the fields of engineering, chemistry and physics, just to name a few, where if you look in the classified ads in your local paper, it will clearly say, “bachelor of science degree required”. So if you graduated college with a bachelor of arts degree, you won’t be able to apply for that job. Oh, you can still send in your resumé, but don’t expect to be called in for an interview.

Now, here is where this becomes very important. There are some colleges that will allow you to get a Bachelor of Arts degree in math, which is technically one of the sciences. The program doesn’t have as many requirements. So when you graduate, while you technically have a degree in one of the sciences, because of the fact that you don’t have a bachelor of science degree, you will not be eligible for that particular job that says “bachelor of science degree required”.

It may seem like a nit picky thing, but these companies want to know that you can get through the tougher curriculum. They want to know that you have a good chance of being able to handle the job that you’re applying for. Is there a really big difference between a bachelor of arts and …

9-Question Interest Inventory: A Great Way to Learn About Your Students

The first homework assignment of every school year for every student in each of my middle school math classes included a 9-question “interest inventory.” This particular interest inventory is a self-assessment tool that invites students to reflect on their past experiences.

My students agreed that answering the 9 interest inventory questions was a nice change from the typical “What’s your favorite this/that” survey, and I certainly had fun reading my students’ responses! Straight away – at the very start of the school year – it is a very good way to get a bigger picture (even just a slightly bigger picture) of each student.

For teachers, the interest inventory can provide good initial information about student strengths and weaknesses. In fact, I think this questionnaire invited some students to talk with me in person about their strengths and interests, giving me even more information about learning styles.

Here is the 9-question inventory. I always asked students to answer all parts of each question, and to neatly write their answers in complete sentences.

1. What is your favorite activity or subject in school? Why? What is your least favorite? Why?

2. What subjects are difficult for you? What makes them the hardest?

3. If you could learn about anything you wanted to, what would you choose to learn about? Please be specific. (For example: meteorology, science fiction writing, architecture, cooking, carpentry, movie-making, etc.)

4. If people were to come to you for information about something you know a lot about, what would the topic be?

5. If you could plan a field trip, where would you go? Why?

6. Fill in the blank and rate EACH choice 1 = best, 2 = ok, 3 = worst

I learn ____ alone.

I learn ____ with one other person.

I learn ____ in a small group.

I learn ____ in a large group.

7. What helps you learn? (For example: hands on experience, reading quietly, taking notes, reading out loud, etc)

8. What projects – either past school assignments or outside of school – are you most proud of? Why?

9. Think of a great teacher you’ve had. Describe what made this teacher so terrific.

One student knew a lot about horses, and throughout the year gave me unsolicited tidbits of information (such as defining riding styles and saddles), and every once in a while updated me on her training and competitions. Getting to know her a little bit more outside the math classroom helped to engage her inside the math classroom.

Another student was proud of training her hamster, named El Noche, to win the local Petco Hamster Derby! I had to ask her about it because I had never heard of Petco Hamster Derbies. She happily described how she executed her training regimen in one of the hallways in her home.

The student who answered “I want to learn how to draw faces” is now a student at LaGuardia High School of Music and Art and Performing Arts. Without asking her …