Career Advice – Self Development – Balancing My Extrovert Nature

This tip is part of a two part series on introverts and extroverts in the workplace – we'll start with extroverts. Extroverted people are easily recognizable because they tend to gravitate to the center of a crow and love to be right in the thick of the action. They tend to seek the spotlight. When it comes to jobs in organizations extroverts are usually found in bars such as sales people or other roles that have high people interaction responsibilities. But what happens when a group of employees are heavily weighed against extroversion? Well, they lack some of the gifts that introverts bring to the party, for example thoughtful reflection on issues!

So if you think you may be an extrovert (ie outgoing, love interacting with others, and need constant contact with your buddies – live or by phone or texting) here are some tips for self reflection:

  • Make sure you are listening – extroverts are rather to carrying the conversation without giving others space to provide their input. Well, they would not have considered extroverts if they did not. As a member of a team and it is important to collaborate and make sure you are listening and hearing opinions from others in the group.
  • Focus on the problems at hand – although it may be hard not to jump from one topic to the next, remember, some of your more introverted co-workers may find it easier to focus on one thing at a time.
  • Recognize that not everyone is as out going as you – other people may be more reserved than you! Introverted people will be less likely to talk as much about their ideas; but do not assume that their quiet demeanor is tacit consent for your ideas!
  • Think ideas through and be sure to explain them thoroughly – ideas probably come to you a mile a minute, but do not expect everyone else to bound to each with your energy; they're probably playing catch up. Slow down and think through any ideas you throw out to the group and help them to see the value they will bring.

Early History of Oxford University

There has been a passing around Oxford since Roman times. However nothing permanent was established until about 700 AD when the hamlet of Oxnaforda became a strategic place between the kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex. After the Norman request the town was fortifies from about 1070. Some of these city walls remain and one of the mounds is still in existence (by the Old Prison)

Origins of the University.

The first evidence of learning in Oxford could be traced back to 720 AD when the local ruler King Didan founded a nunnery for his devout daughter Frideswide. This was built in the grounds of Christ Church Cathedral. This nunnery later dissected but it was taken over by a community of Anglican monks in about 1120. They rebuilt the chapel and dedicated the church to St Frideswide. This was the foundation for Christ Church Cathedral.

By 1167 there were 3 small monastic schools of learning in Oxford, of which the community in Christ Church was one. Around this time of 1167 many English schools were forced to flee the University of Paris. The current King, Henry II encouraged many of these to come to Oxford and continue their studies. The patronage of Henry II was important for the development of Oxford as a seat of learning.

The schools welcomed the traditional curriculam from Paris. All learning was under the Chuch of Rome and all scholars and Masters were in holy orders and used to wear a long black gown. These scholars were not of the nobility but often from humble origins but they played an important role in the administration of the state being the small% of the literate population.

In 1214 Oxford was recognized as a university by the Church and the first Chancellor was appointed. This attracted many scholars to come. These young boisterous schools often created friction and conflict with the local towns people and during this century there were frequently "town versus gown" riots which left a couple of people dead. Because of this many schools moved to other towns such as Cambridge leading to the formation of other universities.

In the 13th Century many masters created halls of residence to protect scholars from local hostility. Also in the 13th century there appeared the first of the University colleges. Colleges were different to the halls of residence because they were not tied to the monastic tradition. In fact many colleges preverted their members from taking monastic vows. This enabled more adventurous teaching than in the monastic halls. The colleges were like a secular response to the monastic halls of residence.

Oxford Colleges were usually founded by rich churchmen who had no offspring to leave their wealth. Thus it was seen as a commendable act to create a college and endow it with wealth. Because of their greater wealth and permanence the colleges flourished and gradually began to overtake and absorb the smaller, more impermanent halls.

The first 3 colleges to be set up were University college, Merton …