How to Make State-of-the-Art Video Singles Cheaply

When it comes to promoting their new music releases, I have

found that most musicians only consider radio as the vehicle

for exposing their music to the public.

Rarely do they consider publicity, in the form of print media,

i.e., music magazines, weekly arts and entertainment

publications and newspapers as support tools to help support

their radio airplay (another subject I shall address shortly).

But, even rarer, is their consideration of the importance of

having videos for their singles. A video of your single, which

was once considered an optional luxury, is now a standard,

vital and necessary tool if you are going to compete with

fellow independent recording artists for media and consumer

attention.

And, a video is even more important if you are going to

compete with major label artists. In fact, since having a video

for your single, particularly, your very first single from a new

release, is so vitally important, why would you even release a

recording without one in today’s music climate?

To me, that is like a soldier going to war with only a handgun

while leaving his automatic weapon behind in his barracks.

But, perhaps, in your mind, you believe that it is still very

expensive to produce videos for your singles. Even more,

while you are likely an expert on producing music, you

probably feel like an amateur when it comes to video

production. However, that need not be the case any longer.

So, I am going to show you a no-brainer approach to easily

getting a video produced for, at least, your first single from

your new release, if not all of your singles.

* Steps to Getting Your Video Singles Produced Cheaply *

1. After you have your mastered soundtrack, and have

selected your first single, you should then contact an area

college, university or art institute.

2. Tell the school’s administration department that you need

to get in touch with its “broadcast journalism” department.

3. When you reach the broadcast journalism department,

ask to speak to an “advisor” or “department head.”

4. Tell the advisor or department head that you are an artist

interested in getting a music video produced, and that you

would like to be put in touch with either a senior student or

graduate student who is majoring in broadcast journalism

with, perhaps, a concentration on “production” or “direction.”

You may also want to stress your preference for a student

who has experience with having produced music videos

already. Depending on the size of the school, there will likely

be several highly qualified student candidates.

In most cases, you will find video producers or directors who

will want to work from a script, which includes a story line, for

your video single. If that is the case, and you are in need of

a script, I would like to direct you to MuBiz.com, which can

produce a video script from your single. See the below link:

[http://www.mubiz.com/services.html#Video_Scripting]

You can also see a sample video script that …

Preparing For a Successful Mining Career

When you think of getting a mining career, one of the advantages to this is that there are many positions available to unskilled workers as well. Although many vacant position postings cater to people considered to be skilled in their jobs, there is also a wide opportunity for unskilled workers who are still trying to gain experience. In the Australia mining industry for example, many job hunters want to find the entry level job perfect for their credentials.

The advantage in taking up an entry-level job as an unskilled worker in Australia mining industries is that you can build up on your experience first. Not many people are able to get the right training and this is why an entry-level job is often the best way to start your career in the mining industry. However if you are a skilled worker but there are no vacant positions ideal for you, you can also take up an unskilled job post first, and start from there.

When you choose to get an unskilled job in the mining industry, you need to have the physical stamina in doing so. Most of the mining career tasks require intensive effort, so you need to be ready for them. Although not all jobs are physically taxing, it is important for you to expect that the jobs could also be challenging and often situated in difficult areas. Thus, following the right instructions is essential, specifically when it comes to safety measures.

Another typical job for an unskilled labourer is being the operator of a machine or some dump trucks. Thus, you need to have the right license for such jobs, like a driving license or a truck license. Most of the jobs available in the mining industry are done on a per-shift basis. Most of the shifts run for straight 12 hours. The roster arrangement is also often followed in many types of the mining career. This often dependent on the company you are employed with nonetheless. Rosters can run for 3 weeks, giving you a week off.

You can find a wide range of mining jobs in Australia.

Some of these jobs are trade assistants, preparers, driller assistants, and of course, being a general laborer. Office positions, albeit on an entry-level, are also available. These include cleaning positions in the office and even catering posts. There is also a good opportunity for you to earn good money from a mining career, even when you choose an entry-level post.

Although you are merely applying for entry-level jobs, the right background and training is still important. You need to have the right licenses for your position, and this also includes the right credentials and certifications. In Australia, there are many mining jobs waiting to be filled. One of the best things that you can do before applying for any job is to get the needed advice from professionals.

By seeking the right assistance from the right sources and knowing where to look, you can jump start on your …

Career Planning – Winning the Performance Review Game

Q. My performance review was disappointing, although I've had two promotions in the last four years. My boss said I needed to work on showing more leadership skills when I'm working on a team. When I try to pin him down for a discussion, he brushes me aside.

A. As you move up the ladder, you'll be expected to work on your own, with less and less feedback and direction.

A lack of feedback can be a sign that you're trusted and respected. You're expected to read between the lines and interpret unwritten signals.

Start with these three questions:

Q1. What is your company's culture around performance reviews?

In some cultures, you're expected to take a negative review in stride. Responding will be viewed as defensive and insecure behavior. Other cultures value discussion and at least the appearance of openness.

Q2. What signals are you sending?

Your boss needs to know that you're willing to talk tough. You can say something like, "Do not worry about hurting my feelings. Then act on your promise.

You may say, "I'm happy with my review – just trying to learn. Can you give me some specific examples of situations where I could have demonstrated more leadership?

Q3. What's the unwritten message?

Your boss may be absolutely delided with your performance, but the rules (formal or informal) require him to include negative along with positive feedback. So he thread in some comments about leadership, which does not amount to much.

The key is to take your performance review in context. If you're receiving tangible recognition – increased responsibility, invitations to key meetings, attention from major players – you'll appear insecure if you worry about your performance review. But if you're getting warning signals – missed meetings, weaker assignments – you need to understand what's really going on. …