A Career Tip for Students – Have a Back-Up Plan

How many people do you know from college who ended up employed in careers absolutely unrelated to their degrees? I know a few … actually, quite a few. Indeed, I would venture to say that a sizeable majority of college grads are now doing exactly what they did not set out to do. Out of survival necessity, or because a new dose of reality changed their interests or plans, they failed to something that simply did not figure into their original thinking. Dave has a BA in anthropology from the University of Washington, but, six years of stock clerk jobs later, along with some significant re-schooling, we see him working as a software engineer with Lockheed Martin. Janet has a BS in art history, but marriage, children, the cost of living, and the job market have directed her to re-train as a medical assistant. She is now working at a major hospital. These are both fictional characters and events, but they are based on an army of real cases.

So, if you are a student early in your college career and you are still thinking about choosing a major, or if you are a high school graduate looking forward, here is a piece of advice – do not choose a major. Choose TWO majors. Particularly if your major major (which you are passionately attached to) is not something "hot", as the job market goes, you may want to explore a second major that piques your interest but at the same time will afford you practical work opportunities as soon as possible after you graduate. In other words – HAVE A BACK-UP PLAN. This may mean taking a few extra courses. This may mean re-orienting your thinking a little about your future and your dreams. Here is a good first step in that direction: Check out the Occupational Outlook Handbook online by going to bls.gov/oco.

This is an excellent and comprehensive source of information about a variety of occupations. It is produced and updated by the US Department of Labor and it is entirely online – no need to purchase or order anything or complete an online registration form. For hundreds of occupations, this Handbook will tell you about training and education required, salaries, what the workers do on the job, the working conditions, information about the job market for each state, and, possibly most relevant to our topic – expected job prospects and job search tips. After you have done a little homework with this and any other sources you can get your hands on, then look at the school programs and requirements related to your choice (or short-list of choices, as the case may be).

Always remember that, no matter what your career passion is at the moment, it is a good thing to diversify. Go for two or more skill / education sets, rather than one. You may be glad you did … and you may have a little more control over your future as a result, instead …

English Law

English law is practised worldwide as many legal systems are based on English Common Law. Over the years, countries have modified this to reflect their needs but its influence is still evident within the legal policies and traditions of many countries, including several American States.

There are countries which have steadfastly adhered to English legal traditions and they have retained the Privy Council in London as their ultimate Court of Appeal. Others have replaced wigs and gowns with more modern attire, legal terminology have been replaced by plain terms and some court procedures have been simplified.

English Law covers the geographical areas of England and Wales. Scotland enjoys its own legal system and although Wales has undergone devolution with the creation of the new Welsh Assembly, it is still bound within Civil and Criminal Law to the laws of England.

One of the peculiarities of our system is the Divided Profession of Solicitors and Barristers. Solicitors are general legal practitioners who can either specialise in one aspect of law or they can offer legal services in all areas. Barristers are our litigation specialists who can be instructed by solicitors whenever there are more complicated court cases. Many overseas countries do not have this division and there legal professionals are ‘Attorneys’, who can offer all aspects of legal work including taking highly complicated cases through the courts.

All this makes it easier to achieve an international qualification from a UK-based institution, especially for students of the Commonwealth.

With the increasing popularity and acceptance of online courses, qualifying in English Law has never been more convenient. The number of students with Paralegal qualifications in particular has increased and students worldwide are reaping the benefits. Law degrees are another popular option with some UK universities offering online degrees. Having a paralegal qualification will aid with being accepted within universities and this is a huge benefit for mature students.

Anyone contemplating whether it is beneficial to pursue a UK qualification in law should be assured that it is. An English qualification is still one which is highly respected but prospective students should carry out ‘due diligence’ to ensure that the institution with which they choose to study, offers an appropriate course.

Mature students are now experiencing life-changing career benefits, made possible by institutions such as the Online Training College, which offers Paralegal and Legal Secretary qualifications globally. Many students can progress to be undergraduates of UK universities, writing law. This level of achievement could not have been contemplated until a few years ago and has brought significant career opportunities because English Law is universal.

It is never too late to re-invent oneself and a course in English Law may be the perfect way to begin.…

The Importance of Secondary Education

Education forms an important part of a person’s life as it enables them to gain the skills that are needed to face life situations. It is a must for every person to gain the right education and to pass on from one level of studies to another so that he or she gains the knowledge needed to handle life situation and work demands that come at a later point in life. As part of the process of gaining the right education, it is necessary for a person to attend secondary education.

Right after primary school, a child has to pass onto secondary education, which is one of the key aspects of education, after which college education will follow. Secondary education centers are referred to as middle schools, preparatory schools, high schools, vocational schools and so on, depending on their education objective.

Secondary education is referred to as K-12 education in the United States, Australia and Canada and in New Zealand it is referred to as 1-13. In Europe, it came into place in the 16th century, while in the United States it came into existence only in the early 19th century as a result of factories opening up, which created the need for skilled workers.

It is vital for every student to have a secondary education, because it serves as the link between what they imbibe in primary school and college education. Much vital knowledge that helps a growing mind to think, analyze and study the world around them, is developed and enhanced even further as a result of what is learnt or imbibed in primary school. Colleges demand that a student must complete their education before he or she can move onto gaining college admission because it provide the complete foundation upon which students can build a higher educational framework.…