Why Dance, Why Not – A Book Review on Dancing

Over the years, I’ve been very impressed with what Sir Ken Robinson has to say about creativity in our schools. He explains the problem with rote memorization, and seems to speak with the aversion that most Americans have with the No Child Left Behind legislation (NCLB). Some of my friends have called the NCLB Legislation; the No Child Allowed to Advance directive. I guess in some regards I do agree with that observation. In one of Sir Ken Robinson’s most famous TED Talk, he suggests that we ought to be teaching dance in our schools, yes dance.

Why you ask? Well, it is a creative exercise and it helps your brain develop and think. He’s right and now neurologists know why. The nerve endings are attached to nerves which run up the spinal column and right into the brain, it’s an extension of that system. In fact, if you’d like to learn more about all this, maybe I can save you some trouble in your personal research as I had recently asked myself some of these questions, trying very hard to confirm what many teachers and educators have speculated for decades. If this topic also intrigues you there are some very good books I’d like to recommend that you read;

1. “The Artful Mind: Cognitive Science and the Riddle of Human Creativity,” edited by Mark Turner, Oxford University Press, New York, NY, 2006, 314 pages, ISBN: 978–0-19-530636-1.

This book is a compilation of academically peer reviewed articles and essays on the topic, much of which has taken all the old works of white dead men famous psychologists and merged it with modern day neuroscience. Some of which proves what we inherently already know and have readily observed in case studies, other essays challenge the status quo and knowledge we thought we believed turning everything on its head. A very important set of reads for sure, for anyone researching this topic.

2. “Dance/Movement Therapists in Action: A Working Guide to Research Options,” edited by Robyn Flaum Cruz, Cynthia Florence Berrol, Charles Thomas Publishers, Springfield, IL, 233 pages, ISBN: 978-0-39-80750-40.

Edited in a similar format, but the essays focus on what to do with all this new information and how to best utilize it for therapy. Not only does it do tremendous physical good, but it can be used creatively in therapy and learning to do wonders for cognitive ability, helping the student to overcome challenges and increase their ability to think. It all starts with a little dance. I hope when you get a change, you will choose to dance. Please consider all this and think on it.…

Areas Of Your Life That Are Key To Living A Balanced Life

What are the keys to living a balanced life? How can we live our life to the fullest if one or more areas of our life go unfulfilled or neglected? For example, maybe you are successful in your career. But allow your family life to suffer? Or maybe you are a very informed person. But you allow your health to wither away.

To live your life abundantly, I believe there are certain areas of life you need to develop for balance in your life. Those areas would be mind, body, Belief system, career, and relationship.

Mind

Your mind deals with your desire to learn. In this fast-changing world, your ability to absorb new skills and information become ever more important. You have to build your intellectual hunger by building your personal development regime. This will not be easy, but it can be done.

Body

Your body is an area that deals with your physical health. Since your body is the means through which you conduct your actions, it is important to keep your body in tip-top shape. Not only will a healthy body prevent you from being sick, it will also help you thrive at a high-level to help you accomplish your duties with speed and passion.

Belief System

Your belief system is an area that deals with your integrity, values, and ideologies. It also deals with your relationship with the infinite. Your belief system is where your life purpose and meaning comes from. In my opinion, the fact that it gives purpose in life is vital to your existence. But it doesn’t mean that you should focus on only developing your belief system. Even if your belief system is strong, you won’t live your life to the fullest if you don’t balance the other areas in your life mentioned in this article.

Career

This area of your life deals with your career and achievements. This area has to do with the productivity in your life; your productivity is measured by what is accomplished during your career. If you want to be a productive person, you should increase your production in this area.

These essential areas should serve as the basis for you to build your life on. You will want a balanced growth in all these areas. You will want to allocate your time to each area equally. You should make periods of time for your belief system, mind, body, relationship, and career.

If you feel that you are under developed in a certain area, you will want to put more effort into that area. I have used this framework for years and I feel the benefits of doing so. Again, the key is balancing all areas of your life.

Relationship

This area deals with your relationships with your friends, family, and associates. Relationships are what make your life beautiful. The greatest feeling of fulfillment doesn’t come from your achievements; it comes from your relationships. You are only as good as the relationships you nurture, cultivate, and maintain.…

Top Universities in Canada

Canadian universities are some of the best in the world in terms of learning, research, cultural and development opportunities. Students from all parts of the world go to Canada year after year to enroll in some of the best universities in this country. Some students cite Canada's diversity and multiculturalism as some of the reasons for selecting Canadian instead of British, Australian or American universities. Others chose to apply to Canadian universities because of their affordability, excellence, and employment opportunities after graduation. If you are interested in selecting Canada as your education destination, it's important to gather information and facts about all types of universities in this country. Here is a summary of the best small, medium and large universities in Canada.

St Francis Xavier University

This small university located in Antigonish, Nova Scotia (Northeast Canada) is ranked as the # 1 university in Canada among primarily undergraduate universities by Maclean's – one of the leading publications in Canada. St. Francis Xavier is home to more than 4,200 students who come from many parts of Canada and other countries. The university is well known for its quality programs in arts, science, business and information systems, but most students choose to go there because of its small campus atmosphere, small classes, one-on-one faculty-student interaction, community service and research opportunities. St. Francis Xavier offers approximately 33 academic programs ranging from Anthropology to Economics to Human Kinetics. Some of the most popular majors include Business, Information Systems, Nursing and Aquatic Resources.

Admission

Admission requirements generally include a high school diploma or its equivalent with courses in English, Mathematics, and other academic subjects. US high school graduates must have completed 16 academic subjects including four English courses. International students who native language is not English and who have not attended school in an English-speaking country must submit TOEFL scores (236 on the computer-based test and 580 on the paper-based test are required).

Tuition and General Fees *

Canadian Students: $ 6,800 Canadian Dollars (CAD) / academic year (approximately $ 5,783 USD)

International Students: $ 13,289 CAD / academic year (approximately $ 11,300 USD)

Scholarships are available for Canadian and international students who possess excellent grades (85% or greater), a history of community work, leadership and dedication to others.

University of Guelph

Located in Ontario and one hour west of Toronto, the University of Guelph offers excellent academic, research and international opportunities without sacrificing the friendship and comfort of a small community. The university is home to 16,000 undergraduate students and 1,964 graduate students including international students from over 100 countries.

Rated by Maclean's as the # 1 comprehensive university in Canada, the University of Guelph offers a variety of academic programs in arts, science, commerce, technology, engineering, architecture, veterinary medicine, and other fields. Many programs offer co-op opportunities that allow students to apply their academic knowledge in practical industry work. Because of the university's commitment to internationalism, study abroad programs abound including exchange programs with universities in Australia, England, France, India, Latin America, South …