Total Quality Management (TQM) As a Corporate Strategy in Higher Education

The need for continued improvement to the experience of students and staff in higher education institutions (HEIS) is now a common clarion call. One way to respond to this strong request for something to happen is for HEis to employ total quality management (TQM) as a Corporate Strategy.

TQM

A critical component of the TQM is its focus on improving the customers' (students) experience and ensuring that employees (staff) are up to speed with their professional development and training. This is achieved through their involvement and by consulting with them. The other component is to improve the product. In the case of HEis, this includes teaching and other related services. Again this can be done by engaging staff and students in the process. These I may address in another article.

Reasons for implementing TQM in HEi

The implementation of TQM as a corporate strategy in HEis is necessary for a number of reasons. Firstly, as outlined above, it has the potential to enable a response to the call for improving the students' experience by engaging students and staff in determining the direction and vision of the institution. It is now an established fact that people are inclined to engage fully in activities created or facilitated by them. Secondly, involving and consulting with students and staff enabling activities and developments such as infrastructural changes, re-assignment of personnel and the introduction of new models, to be viewed in a positive light and improved upon incrementally.

How to implement TQM

Firstly , there is the need to define the term 'quality' and clearly point out actions and thoughts which indicates quality in the institutions as this relates to staff and students. This has to be done according to departments and functions, students and staff.

Secondly , there is the need to get staff and students' 'buy-in' by creatively stating and reinforcing the fact that TQM is not only relevant to the mission and mandate of the institution but will enable efficiency to be the 'hallmark' of the institution and the service offered to staff and students.

Thirdly , to implement TQM in HEis requires the cooperation of senior and other management staff in the process of creating and implementing policies in this regard. This is a challenging task for the leadership and several factors such as financial resources, institutional culture and gaining the commitment of those in management at all level must be considered when making and implementing policies.

Finally, for TQM to be implemented in any HEi require a strong institutional support in the form of leadership, guidance and resource allocation. Also critical to the success of TQM implementing is the 'political will' and fortitude of a few key people in leadership who are willing to wrestle, argument for, implement and evaluate the strategy. Any lack of effort or resources will threaten the success of a TQM strategy and may cause overall failure. …

Auto Selling as a Career

One of my previous carers was selling cars. I have had about 15 jobs in my lifetime and that was one of the hardest in many ways. Prior to selling cars I was in restaurant management so it was a completely new experience. One plus factor to a car sales career is that it is easy to get that kind of job. My local paper had dealer help wanted ad's suggesting huge pay with no experience required. The first place I applied to offered me a job after a five minute interview. I went downtown for a license and started the next day. Auto dealers usually pay straight commission so they do not have much to loose if a new hire does not work out.

I worked six days a week and twelve hours a day my first 2 years in the business. The first year my income was very low, even working long hours. About 1 out of 10 new salespeople leased less than a month at this dealership!

After the first year the job was easier and I made more missions. My selling skills improved and I was getting repeat and referral business. I sent mail to all my previous customers every month, which helped stay in touch with them. After two years I was one of the top sales reps .. After three years I moved to fleet sales. Then I went to fleet manager, leasing manager, and finally to inventory manager. Manager pay was much better.

After more than twenty years in the business I look back on it as a good experience overall. I would not recommend auto sales as a career for most people. However there is an opportunity to make very good money and move up, even without a higher education. For those still in school I would say get all the education you can, and do not sell cars!

My new career is insurance and mortgage loans. …