Dental Hygienist Career Information

Dental hygienist vocations are numbered among the fastest developing professions. To become a dental hygienist a person must complete a study course from an licensed dental hygiene school or from an online college. The dental hygienist works closely with the dentist to meet the needs of patients. Every state has its' own particular set of regulations so naturally the types of functions that the hygienist provides will vary. For the most part dental hygienists careers needitate teeth cleansing and orally examining patients for signs of disease. They also examine a patient's neck as well as head for signs of oral disease. Dental hygienists normally teach patients proper oral hygiene care such as teeth brushing, proper nutrition, and flossing. The dental hygienist professional also take and develop X-rays and apply medicinal substances like fluoride treatments and sealants to the teeth as well as take care of dental chart entries, take blood pressure and pulse readings and clean away calculus and plaque from the tooth surface and take teeth impressions for study casts.

Currently there are almost 280 recognized dental hygiene programs available at many universities and online. There are online Masters, associates and bachelors degree courses available. About every state advocates the hygienists to acquire a degree from an approved dental hygiene school but they must also pass a written and clinical exam. Along with being schooled dental hygienists must also become licensed in the State that they will be practicing in.

Job Opportunities

More than half of dental hygienists work part time. The Salaries for this profession lends itself to flexibility. There are full-time, part-time, evening and weekend schedules readily available. Hygienists are a highly sought after professional and most often they work in a dental office setting but they also work in hospitals, nursing homes and public health facilities.

Salaries

Dental hygienists pay change from state to state. The average entry level dental hygienists pay is $ 45,000 but the making ability grows with experience. …

Preparing for College

It is never too early and it is never too late to start thinking about college. Nevertheless, early is always better.

What are you and your child doing to prepare for college?

THE EARLY YEARS

Begin college preparation in kindergarten, young students are receptive to thinking about college. Spend the early years exploring study methods, reading and experiencing life, find opportunities that increase curiosity and open the mind to creative and organized thought processes. Foster goal oriented thinking and time management skills in the child, so in the future they will have the tools to keep themselves on task.

Young students are especially successful at learning languages and music, even a child as young as four or five can start taking piano or keyboard lessons. If you have the means to expose them to a second language through travel or tutoring, give it a try, children can pick up second languages much faster than adults.

Of course, it is never too early to open a college savings account.

JUNIOR HIGH

By junior high, students should have a solid understanding of mathematics and be able to compose logical, grammatically correct essays.

Establish a college savings fund or other fund designed specifically for higher education if you haven’t already, this is a good time to start. See your local bank or credit union to find an account that offers the best rate. Parents should discuss investments and deposits to the college fund with the child, it is important that they understand the realities of how much college and living outside the home costs.

Children at this age are capable of visualizing their own future independent of parents, and strive for a decision-making role in their own lives. Recognize and respect uniqueness, support interests and allow them to evaluate opportunities. Of course, teenagers might think they know everything, so before they make a choice, ask them carefully thought out questions to guide them to a logical and informed decision.

HIGH SCHOOL

In high school, curriculum, grade point average and extracurricular activities become important factors in regards to college entrance requirements and scholarship opportunities.

Generally, most colleges desire that the student successfully complete the following basic subjects in high school:

  • 4 years of English
  • 3 years of Math, including Algebra and Geometry
  • 3 years of history and social sciences
  • 2 years of lab sciences
  • 2 years of a foreign language
  • College Guidance Counselor: Students should begin meeting with a guidance counselor at the beginning of 9th grade to ensure that all of the proper course work is taken, maintain a relationship throughout high school. Often the counselor can provide information on college entrance exams and scholarship information.

    A Note on Mathematics: Since many students struggle to retain their math skills, it is unwise to skip math in the senior year. Forgetting valuable information before taking placement exams, Advanced Placement Tests, the SAT or ACT could prevent the student from receiving a high score or require them to take a remedial math class …