Why You Need a Career Mentor

Mentors are an important resource for success on the job. Finding one can be a task, positioning you to be selected as a mentee is another. Here are some helpful tips.

Mentoring used to be an informal and difficult process. Managers would identify potential success stories. You had to be likeable or someone who reminded the mentor of his or her early years. The golf course or a game of billiards would open opportunities to be groomed. Relationships would develop over cold beers. You guessed it, the "good old boy" network. If you did not hang out you were left out.

Companies today realize the organizational benefit of supporting and developing talent and are establishing formal mentor programs that ensure growth from the bottom to the top lasts from within. Will employees stay longer if they feel like they are being groomed for success? Are you the best option for a new opportunity if your career is being guided by manager, supervisor, coach, or a specialist?

Having a mentor allows access to information that may not otherwise be available to you. Mentors show you the ropes, they lend you a hand, and they provide insight into a world that continues to change as you navigate through it. Mentors provide quality information because more than likely they have made the same mistakes you are asking, so you benefit from the secret weapon. Think about your co-workers, everyone wants to get promoted all at the same time. You better believe if you have a strong mentor and you are following his or her advice you should have an edge. I have seen too many times one position opens and 3 employees want that new title. Read below for tips on why you need a career mentor.

Motivation – A good mentor has the rare ability to explain to you what you need to do and why, in a way that makes sense. An encounter with a mentor often becomes a turning point in your career or business.

Success – A mentor who shares their experience with you helps you to avoid mistakes that you would otherwise make. Achieving success faster and with less effort, would you consider that to be efficient and effective?

Honesty – A mentor is a person who is not emotionally involved in your situation, your friends, family, barber, or hairstylist love to give advice. These people either, do not know, are emotional involved, or tell you exactly what you want to here. A mentor's advice should be free and straight to the point.

Positive Attitude – When "Murphy's Law" kicks in to your life a good mentor knows you are bleeding internally, but they have a plan to get you patched up, in a step by step approach. Mentors always have a story to make you feel good and to give the necessary encouragement to move forward.

Improvement – Your mentor will expect some improve. You should expect to grow with knowledge. Mentors will advise homework, such as …

Thessaloniki Student Housing

A brief Thessaloniki student housing guide

Based on the Greek Ministry of Education, there are approximately 330.000 students at Greek public universities at any one time. Thessaloniki accounts for nearly 1/3 of the total number of students in Greece with an estimated 100.000 students (including those attending private colleges and other higher education establishments).

For a city of 800.000 people (city population 2011) this means a particularly high proportion of students, which is evident from the lively atmosphere and nightlife. The majority of the students are coming from other Greek cities, from Europe via exchange programs and from the Balkan countries in order to study at high quality private colleges. Estimating that on average a full-time student spends about 4 years in Thessaloniki (excluding exchange students), this means that there are approximately 25.000 new students in the city every year. And they all need a place to stay…

This article will provide a brief guide to the types of available student housing, the areas, prices, and things to be aware of regarding student accommodation in Thessaloniki.

1. Types of student accommodation

1a. University public dorms.

The University of Thessaloniki offers dorms to students, based on need and mainly on financial criteria. They are provided free of charge. In practice this means that it is pretty difficult to get a dorm room even if you are eligible to get one. The dorms are mostly located close to the university campus, but their quality is very low and maintenance is a big issue, along with issues about safety etc.

1b. University Student Hostels.

These are private properties (entire buildings) which are subleased by the University and are provided mainly to exchange students requiring accommodation for a few weeks or months. These are usually ERASMUS students. As of 2011 there are two student hostels, “Matsi Street 7” and “Kassandrou Street 134”, both very close to the university. They offer fully furnished “dorm-style” rooms with ensuite private bathroom and kitchenette (Kassandrou 134) single and double rooms, a laundry area and wireless internet access.

1c. Private hostels.

For students wishing to stay only a few days/weeks, these hostels are more appropriate and a better solution than a hotel. However, these are hard to find as private hostels that rent rooms/beds by the day/week are not legal in Greece unless they are Non-Profit Organizations.

1d. Private rental flats.

These are standalone flats (studio, 1 or 2 bedrooms) located all over the city that students can rent from private owners. You can usually find them through real estate agents (beware) or online ads. You will need to find the appropriate one to suit your needs. Most of them are unfurnished or partly furnished and are more suited to students who plan to stay in Thessaloniki for a few years (as you’d have to buy electrical appliances, fridge, cooker, etc).

When you move in you will need to enter into a contract with the electricity company DEI, the water and sewage company EYATH and the gas company for …