Statistics on Adults Returning to College

Due to the economy these days, and the huge number of newly graduated youngsters, the job market is a fierce competitive monster to be reckoned with. Many older, more experienced, adults are using a return to school to add extra armor to their resume in an attempt to come out on top. But the process of making that return can be a long arduous fight all on its own.

Most employees over 35 have disadvantages they must tote along with them through their returning education years. They have families to care for, financial instability due to unemployment, or they contend with their unsatisfying job that they must cling to for dear life until they are able to earn that certification that will allow them to advance onto something greater. Battling all of these added troubles can be tiresome, but if you want something better for yourself, you have to make sacrifices.

Now, it seems that many older adults are returning to college and deciding to make those sacrifices. Some find ways to squeeze schooling into their already hectic lifestyle by waking up before dawn to study, or attending weekend, or online classes. Some other adults returning to college will take on a full workload during the day and then attend classes afterward for some nighttime college schooling.

Student admissions over the age of 35 have climbed in numbers, especially in the last 10 years. Adults returning to college now make up almost 20% of enrollment these days, which is double what it used to be when they were the young 18-year-old demographic. These days two in every five college students are older than 25.

Online colleges have become the best ally to older adults who wish to progress in the competitive workforce. About 75% of colleges offer online courses in the U.S. alone. The University of Phoenix Online boasts 63,000 students attending already with numbers rising. Adults returning to college to finish a bachelor’s degree or earn some type of certification tend to gravitate towards these types of methods because it allows them to attend a class at home while watching over their children, or allot their time given for school in a more convenient way.

The numbers on adults returning to college is on the rise, and it doesn’t seem to be slowing down anytime soon. Soon, the income gap between college graduates and non-grads will grow even larger and education will be more important than ever.…

Top Law Schools

There is some debate as to which schools should compose the list of top law schools. There are a few schools that traditionally top the flags, but whether or not these universities are really worth the cost is quite debatable. For those wishing to pursue a legal career path, though, it is important to know what these rankings actually mean.

The Three Tiers of Law School

Universities that offer a legal education are traditionally grouped into three "tiers" of fifty. The best schools are in the Tier One, followed by those in Tier Two and Tier 3. Traditional wisdom states that the best jobs to go Tier One students, while those in Tier 3 will have the most trouble finding employment. The most competitive bracket is Tier 2, with a number of public universities vying for prestige with some of the larger-name American private colleges.

What Are the Top Law Schools?

As one might expect, the Ivy League is exceptionally well represented in the annual ranking of top law schools. Harvard, Stanford and Yale are traditionally near the top of the list. Columbia, the University of Chicago, and Berkeley usually follow not far behind, with schools like Cornell Law School, Duke, and Georgetown typically bringing up the reminder of the pack. These schools tend to have the best faculty, the most active donors, and some of the most competitive acceptance rates. Whether or not these schools are worth the price, however, is worth questioning.

A Realistic Look

Realistically speaking, the annual report of top law schools is incredibly skewed. Certain schools will always be in the top ten, and certain schools will never rise above the second tier. The quality of education at the top-tier schools is not necessarily better than that in the lower tiers, but the names certainly carry a certain cache with employers. Unless you wish to chase the top one percent of jobs, though, the top ten to fifteen law schools may not be worth the price of admission.

The Top Schools for Your Needs

For the majority of law students, the highest education value can be found in the lower top tier through the second tier of law schools. Most of these schools are reasonably priced, have stellar faculty, and can help a student land a job. While they may not have the name appeal of a Harvard or Stanford, most schools in the second tier also cost only a fraction of those schools' overall price. If you wish to get a legal job in a given area, it is better to seek out a local school than to look at the annual rankings.

The list of the top law schools for one student may not be the same as that for another. The best law school will be one that is affordable for a student's income, yet can still offer a competitive advantage. There is rarely a point in pursuing an education at an incredibly expensive institution if a student is not aiming for …