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Meet 15 candidates running for the D.C. State Board of Education

But while these nonpartisan positions wield little power, they have become symbolic battlegrounds over the future of public education — and the members of the board have emerged as visible education advocates in the city.

Some of the issues dividing the board are mayoral control and, of course, how schools should safely reopen. They also have different opinions on the five-star rating system of schools. The ratings — part of a broader school report card — aim to make school data more accessible. But critics fear the reliance on test scores will reserve the highest accolades for schools that educate the city’s wealthiest students and give paltry ratings to schools that serve the District’s vulnerable children.

This election cycle has drawn nearly 20 candidates for five open seats. (Frazier O’Leary, who holds the Ward 4 seat, is running for reelection unopposed.) And the candidates have attracted tens of thousands of dollars in donations from across the country.

These profiles are based on candidates’ answers in interviews and have been edited for space and clarity.

Ward 2

Allister Chang, 30, is fellow at Halcyon, a nonprofit incubator. Chang is a visiting researcher at the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

Opinion of mayoral control: We need to develop a plan for how we move the State Board of Education from a symbolic role to a more meaningful role for residents. 

Opinion of five-star rating: The top-rated schools tend to serve the students from wealthiest families. We need to improve how we collect and analyze data so we are not penalizing teachers and schools for educating students who come from “at-risk” backgrounds. 

Do you agree with the mayor’s November school reopening plan? We need to offer more outdoor options, given that teachers do not feel comfortable going back to buildings because they don’t know whether HVAC systems will be up to par.

Biggest issue in your ward: My top priority is that every student is equipped with 21st-century literacy. 

Christopher Etesse, 47, runs a cybersecurity boot camp company that partners with universities.

Opinion of mayoral control: I am in favor of mayoral control.

Opinion of five-star rating: The more data you have, the more you can improve.

Do you agree with the mayor’s November school reopening plan? I am in favor of reopening all schools immediately with safety precautions. 

Biggest issue in your ward: I have worked in education technology for 20 years. My goal in running is that I believe I can be helpful to the entire district because of my experience in virtual learning worldwide.

James Harnett, 22, is a senior at George Washington University and the chair of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2A.

Opinion of mayoral control: It does not serve our students.

Opinion of five-star rating system: It’s really important we move away from an emphasis on standardized testing. A one-star evaluation devalues and dehumanizes students who attend a one-star school.

Do you agree with the mayor’s November school reopening plan?

Planet Mars is at its ‘biggest and brightest’

Mars pictured by Damian Peach on 30 September
In all its glory: Mars pictured by Damian Peach on 30 September

Get out there and look up!

Mars is at its biggest and brightest right now as the Red Planet lines up with Earth on the same side of the Sun.

Every 26 months, the pair take up this arrangement, moving close together, before then diverging again on their separate orbits around our star.

Tuesday night sees the actual moment of what astronomers call “opposition”.

All three bodies will be in a straight line at 23:20 GMT (00:20 BST).

“But you don’t have to wait until the middle of the night; even now, at nine or 10 o’clock in the evening, you’ll easily see it over in the southeast,” says astrophotographer, Damian Peach. “You can’t miss it, it’s the brightest star-like object in that part of the sky,” he told BBC News.

Even though this coming week witnesses the moment of opposition, it was Tuesday of last week that Mars and Earth actually made their closest approach in this 26-month cycle.

A separation of 62,069,570km, or 38,568,243 miles. That’s the narrowest gap now until 2035.

At the last opposition, in 2018, Earth and Mars were just 58 million km apart, but what makes this occasion a little more special for astrophotographers in the Northern Hemisphere is the Red Planet’s elevation in the sky. It’s higher, and that means telescopes don’t have to look through quite so much of the Earth’s turbulent atmosphere, which distorts images.

Experienced practitioners like Damian use a technique called “lucky imaging” to get the perfect shot. They take multiple frames and then use software to stitch together the sharpest view.

Damian’s picture at the top of this page shows up clearly the “Martian dichotomy” – the sharp contrast between the smooth lowland plains of the Northern Hemisphere and the more rugged terrain in the Southern Hemisphere. Evident too is Mars’ carbon dioxide ice cap at the southern pole.

The image was captured using a 14-inch Celestron telescope.

“That’s quite a serious bit of equipment; it’s not something you get on a whim,” says Damian. “But even a telescope half that size will show up all the major features on Mars quite easily. And if you’ve got a good pair of binoculars, you’ll certainly be able to make out that it’s actually a planet and not a star.”

It’s around opposition that space probes are launched from Earth to Mars. Obviously – the distance that needs to be travelled is shorter, and the time and energy required to make the journey is less.

Three missions are currently in transit, all of which were sent on their way in July: The United Arab Emirates’s Hope orbiter; China’s Tianwen orbiter and rover; and the Americans’ Perseverance rover.

Europe and Russia had hoped to despatch their ExoMars “Rosalind Franklin” rover, too, but they missed the launch window and will now have to wait until late 2022. That’s the penalty you pay when the planets align only every

Watch Pittsburgh vs Boston College Live: NCAAf Game,Football 2020 Free

Watch Pittsburgh vs Boston College Live Online Football 2020 Free .Each Friday, the Sports Illustrated-AllGators staff will provide predictions and pre-game analysis before the Florida Gators take on their weekly opponefdgnt.

:+::https://dlivetvnet.co/index/

We have decided to tally prediction records as the season goes on. These are purely based on Gators’ win/loss predictions, and not factoring in the spread. With that, each of our contributors has gotten off to an undefeated start for the 2020 season.try

This week, Florida heads to College Station, Texas this week for its first ranked matchup of the season. The No. 4 Gators will take on the No. 21 Texas A&M Aggies on Saturday at noon, on ESPN. Despite fbgfnn being the toughest opponent of the year thus far, and going on the road, our staff is once again confident that the Gators will exit with a victory.rty

Zach Goodall (2-0):

I think this game will be closer than some folks are letting on.

For one, a win against No. 4 Florida would be a massive tone-setter for Jimbo Fisher in his third year at Texas A&M, after what’s been a disappointing first two years of his 10-year, $75 million, fully guaranteed contract. Against what’s been a struggling defense to put it lightly, the Aggies are capable of putting up points.

Not as many as Florida, though. A&M’s defense has allowed nearly 10.5 yards per passing attempt as quarterbacks are completing 71.4% of their passes. Gators quarterback Kyle Trask and his expansive afgfnbrsenal of weapons have to be licking their chops. Pick your poison: Kyle Pitts and/or Kadarius Toney have themselves a big day, depending on how much attention is put on Pitts by the Aggies’ defense.

Score: Florida 38, Texas A&M 33

Demetrius Harvey (2-0):

The Florida Gators will face a tough task this Saturday against the Texas A&M Aggies. A matchup that will ultimately be Florida’s toughest opponent thus far this season. The last time Florida faced off against Texas A&M was in 2017, a game in which came down to the wire. Ultimately, this game could come down to the wire too due to the explosiveness of the quarterbacks on both sides of the football, for different reasons.

The Gators will have a tough time containing veteran quarterback Kellen Mond, but will ultimately live by the arm of their own quarterback in Kyle Trask.

Score: Florida 42, Texas A&M 37

Graham Marsh (2-0):

I like a shootout here, Big-12 style. Texas A&M quarterback Kellen Mond has had his struggles, but he still threw for three touchdowns against Alabama this week while the Gators’ safety room is a massive concern.

Otherwise, Kyle Trask and Co. should have a huge day, huge enough to win a big game on the road. TAMU is young in gdfbthe secondary and won’t be able to keep up with Kyle Pitts, Kadarius Toney, and Trevon Grimes all game long. I’m predicting a Big-12 style loss for the former Big-12 team.

Score:

NASA delays commercial crew mission to study Falcon 9 engine issue

WASHINGTON — NASA is delaying the launch of the first operational SpaceX commercial crew mission to the first half of November to provide more time to review a problem during a recent Falcon 9 launch attempt.

NASA announced Oct. 10 the Crew-1 mission, which was scheduled to launch on a Falcon 9 in the early morning hours of Oct. 31 from the Kennedy Space Center, will now launch no earlier than early to mid-November.

The delay, the agency said, will provide more time for SpaceX “to complete hardware testing and data reviews as the company evaluates off-nominal behavior of Falcon 9 first stage engine gas generators observed during a recent non-NASA mission launch attempt.” NASA did not identify the specific launch attempt in question, but an Oct. 2 launch of a Falcon 9 carrying a GPS 3 satellite was scrubbed just two seconds before liftoff because of SpaceX Chief Executive Elon Musk later described as an “unexpected pressure rise in the turbomachinery gas generator.”

“With the high cadence of missions SpaceX performs, it really gives us incredible insight into this commercial system and helps us make informed decisions about the status of our missions,” Kathy Lueders, NASA associate administrator for human exploration and operations, said in the agency statement. She said an investigation into the problem is ongoing “and we should be a lot smarter within the coming week.”

Both the Crew-1 and the GPS 3 missions are using new Falcon 9 first stages that have not previously launched. After the GPS 3 scrub, SpaceX successfully launched another Falcon 9 Oct. 6 carrying 60 Starlink satellites using a booster making its third flight. SpaceX has yet to reschedule the GPS 3 launch.

NASA said the issue with the Crew-1 mission will not delay another Falcon 9 launch, of the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich Earth observation satellite, scheduled for Nov. 10 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. That mission will also use a new Falcon 9 first stage. Another Falcon 9, likely with a previously flown first stage, will launch a cargo Dragon spacecraft for NASA in late November or early December.

The Crew-1 mission will transport NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover and Shannon Walker, and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi, to the International Space Station for a six-month stay. NASA previously delayed the launch from Oct. 23 to Oct. 31 to provide more time to wrap up certification work of the Crew Dragon spacecraft.

“For this critical launch, we’re happy to support NASA and any schedule that they need,” Hans Koenigsmann, vice president of build and flight reliability at SpaceX, said at a Sept. 29 NASA briefing about the Crew-1 mission just after the agency announced the delay to Oct. 31. “We will fly when we are ready to fly.”

The delay won’t affect another crewed mission to the ISS. The Soyuz MS-17 spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Kate Rubins and Roscosmos cosmonauts Sergey Ryzhikov and Sergey Kud-Sverchkov is scheduled to launch at 1:45 a.m. Eastern Oct. 14 from the Baikonur

2020 College Football Week 6 GameS

Know Arkansas vs Auburn Live Online Football 2020 Free .Each Friday, the Sports Illustrated-AllGators staff will provide predictions and pre-game analysis before the Florida Gators take on their weekly opponent.gfh

We have decided to tally prediction records as the season goes on. These are purely based on Gators’ win/loss predictions, and not factoring in the spread. With that, each of our contributors has gotten off to an undefeated start for the 2020 season.gf

This week, Florida heads to College Station, Texas this week for its first ranked matchup of the season. The No. 4 Gators will take on the No. 21 Texas A&M Aggies on Saturday at noon, on ESPN. Despite being the toughest opponent of the year thus far, and going on the road, our staff is once again confident that the Gators will exit with a victory.fgh

Zach Goodall (2-0):

I think this game will be closer than some folks are letting on.

For one, a win against No. 4 Florida would be a massive tone-setter for Jimbo Fisher in his third year at Texas A&M, after what’s been a disappointing first two years of his 10-year, $75 million, fully guaranteed contract. Against what’s been a struggling defense to put it lightly, the Aggies are capable of putting up points.

Not as many as Florida, though. A&M’s defense has allowed nearly 10.5 yards per passing attempt as quarterbacks are completing 71.4% of their passes. Gators quarterback Kyle Trask and his expansive arsenal of weapons have to be licking their chops. Pick your poison: Kyle Pitts and/or Kadarius Toney have themselves a big day, depending on how much attention is put on Pitts by the Aggies’ defense.

Score: Florida 38, Texas A&M 33

Demetrius Harvey (2-0):

The Florida Gators will face a tough task this Saturday against the Texas A&M Aggies. A matchup that will ultimately be Florida’s toughest opponent thus far this season. The last time Florida faced off against Texas A&M was in 2017, a game in which came down to the wire. Ultimately, this game could come down to the wire too due to the explosiveness of the quarterbacks on both sides of the football, for different reasons.

The Gators will have a tough time containing veteran quarterback Kellen Mond, but will ultimately live by the arm of their own quarterback in Kyle Trask.

Score: Florida 42, Texas A&M 37

Graham Marsh (2-0):

I like a shootout here, Big-12 style. Texas A&M quarterback Kellen Mond has had his struggles, but he still threw for three touchdowns against Alabama this week while the Gators’ safety room is a massive concern.

Otherwise, Kyle Trask and Co. should have a huge day, huge enough to win a big game on the road. TAMU is young in the secondary and won’t be able to keep up with Kyle Pitts, Kadarius Toney, and Trevon Grimes all game long. I’m predicting a Big-12 style loss for the former Big-12 team.

Score: Florida 52, Texas

Key ways Sullivan and Hayes differ on the economy and education in the coronavirus crisis


The coronavirus crisis that continues to stifle jobs and schools across the nation is a key dividing line in the race for Connecticut’s most competitive congressional district.

A New Fairfield prosecutor trying to be the first Republican to represent the 5th District since 2006 says the direction voters wanted when they elected Donald Trump president in 2016 is the way out of the COVID-19 crisis for people in northwestern and central Connecticut.


But U.S. Rep. Jahana Hayes says the correction voters wanted when they elected her and a Democratic majority to the House of Representatives in 2018 is the way to help schools in need and get the economy back on its feet in Connecticut.

Republican challenger David X. Sullivan, a retired assistant U.S. attorney, said he started out campaigning against Hayes but has wound up fighting a war against “Marxism.”



“We need to move forward to provide help to people, but we have to transition away from total dependency on the federal government,” Sullivan told Hearst Connecticut Media last week. “We want to get people back to work.”

Hayes, who first made the spotlight in 2016 as the national Teacher of the Year, said relief for jobs and schools in Connecticut’s 5th District can’t wait for the next election day mandate on Nov. 3.


“We are in a Democratic majority in the House and the bills we are passing reflect Democratic priorities, but they also reflect the priorities of the people of this district,” Hayes told Hearst Connecticut Media. “I vote for the plan that does the greatest amount of good for the greatest amount of people.”


Hayes’ and Sullivan’s comments came at the end of a week of virtual 5th District debates in Danbury and Waterbury, and a week of partisan debates in Washington, D.C., over a new COVID-19 relief bill that looked doubtful heading into the weekend.

An independent candidate running to make his case that the two-party system is unworkable said it’s no surprise House Democrats and Senate Republicans were $1 trillion apart about how much relief to provide taxpayers.

“We need an expansion for the unemployment compensation to add additional weeks to it, and if the country can afford it, an additional boost of $300-to-$600 per person,” said Bruce Walczak, an Independent Party candidate from Newtown who is participating in debates but is not raising money or otherwise campaigning in a traditional way.


With three weeks until the election, leading forecasters predict Hayes will be re-elected in a district where registered Democrats outnumber registered Republicans 140,000 to 100,000. Of the minor parties, the Independent Party is by far the largest, with 6,300 registered voters in a district that stretches from Danbury to the Massachusetts border.

The X-factor is the 180,000 registered voters in the 5th District who are unaffiliated with any party.

Schools in crisis

Hayes and Sullivan

Windsor Board of Education names interim superintendent

Terrell Hill has been named Windsor’s interim schools superintendent.



a sign in front of a brick building: The Windsor Board of Education has named Terrell Hill as interim superintendent.


© Steven Goode/Hartford Courant/Hartford Courant/TNS
The Windsor Board of Education has named Terrell Hill as interim superintendent.

He will take over for Craig Cooke, who is leaving to become schools superintendent in Madison. Cooke will leave in early November and Hill will assume his duties on Oct. 26, according to the Windsor Board of Education, which voted 8 to 1 to name him to the position earlier this week.

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Hill has served as assistant superintendent for human resources since 2014.

Hill, who lives in town, has had two children graduate from Windsor High School and a third is now a freshman there, said Friday that he plans to apply for the permanent position when the time comes.

“It’s a place that has burned its way into my heart,” he said. “This is my home.”

The board of education will conduct a national search for Cooke’s replacement. Cooke was assistant superintendent for human resources in Windsor for four years before becoming the interim superintendent in October 2013, when Jeffrey Villar left the district.

Cooke was chosen by the school board to be the superintendent in April 2014.

“Windsor Public Schools is beginning a new chapter with the appointment of Dr. Terrell Hill as interim superintendent. His credentials, familiarity and passion for the district makes him the responsible choice to lead us into the budget process, provide stability and manage all pandemic plans,” said Leonard Lockhart, president of the Windsor school board. “The board of education welcomes Dr. Hill as Interim superintendent and we look forward to working with him.”

Steven Goode can be reached at sgoode@courant.com.

———

©2020 The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.)

Visit The Hartford Courant (Hartford, Conn.) at www.courant.com

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‘Symbolism’ showcases Jewish art at Catholic university

An exhibition showcasing an artist’s Jewish collages is on display at a South Florida Catholic university’s museum.

“Symbolism,” which features eight of artist and architect Robert M. Swedroe’s artworks, can be viewed at St. Thomas University’s Archbishop John C. Favalora Archive & Museum, 16401 N.W. 37th Ave. in Miami Gardens, through Jan. 22, 2021.

Among the objects and symbols featured in Swedroe’s colorful collages include the Ten Commandments, a blue Star of David, a menorah and more.

Swedroe, who lives in Surfside, said the whole exhibition is about Jewish symbolism. He mentioned that he worked on a lot of religious art 47 years ago, when he created most of the exhibition’s collages.

“The artwork sold very well to synagogues primarily in New York, and they all have symbols that are very significant,” he continued.

While Swedroe worked on most of the exhibition’s works in 1972 and 1973, he also made one in 2019 and another in 2006.

Isabel M. Medina, the exhibition’s curator and Favalora Museum’s assistant archivist and coordinator, explained the importance of showcasing the Jewish artworks at the university.

“Even though we’re a Catholic university, we practice inclusion and diversity, and we’re open to everybody,” Medina said. “This exhibition is also very educational. The more we know about everybody’s faiths, the better the relationship between everybody will be. It’s very educational to know what all the symbols that he has in each of the collages mean.”

Jerry Levine, a filmmaker who has produced Jewish-interest independent films, said regarding Swedroe’s work, “Judaism means different things to different people.”

“When I look at Bob’s Jewish works, I see a man connecting with the Almighty in the most personal and intimate manner,” he continued. “I see a scientific mind approaching religion and making peace with the two worlds. I see a person in prayer, using a road map of his own design to connect with the source of all creation.”

Levine added, “What I take away from those collages is 3,000 of pride.”

Levine noted the take aways are “pride and mystification,” and “pride in a people who have survived the best and the worst the world could throw at them.”

“I see the Ark of the Covenant, the rampant Lion of Judah and the 10 Commandments,” he continued. “I see historic icons and symbols of persistence, ethics and wisdom that make me very proud as a Jew. And I also see a people’s survival against all odds that remains mystifying and beyond rational explanation.”

The exhibition is free of charge to view, and guests must follow COVID-19 safety protocols such as mask wearing and distancing. The museum’s hours of operations are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. from Monday-Thursdays, and 10.am. to 5 p.m. on Fridays. Weekend visits are by appointment only.

Contact Medina at imedina@stu.edu or 305-628-6769 to schedule a weekend appointment or for more information on the exhibition.

Visit stu.edu/library/archive-museum/ for more information on the museum, stu.edu/coronavirus/ on the safety guidelines and stu.edu/about-stu/map-directions/ for directions.

Visit swedroeart.com

Alabama vs. Ole Miss score: Live game updates, college football scores, NCAA highlights, full coverage

No. 3 Alabama is traveling to Ole Miss on Saturday evening with a highly-anticipated coaching matchup between Nick Saban and his former offensive coordinator Lane Kiffin taking center stage. Nevermind that Saban improved to 20-0 all-time against his former assistants last week, Saban and Kiffin going head to head has already created fireworks ahead of the game.

The Crimson Tide are coming off of a blowout over Texas A&M, while the Rebels knocked off Kentucky last week. Keep an eye on the offenses in what should be a shootout as long as the weather cooperates. Alabama quarterback Mac Jones has been money finding receivers DeVonta Smith, Jaylen Waddle and John Metchie III. That has allowed running back Najee Harris to get involved in the offense in a variety of ways, making this one of the most versatile units in the country. Kiffin has some weapons at his disposal, too. Quarterback Matt Corral has a rocket arm, and running back Jerrion Ealy is the best running back whose name you probably don’t know.

CBS Sports will be with you the entire way updating this story with the latest from Ole Miss at Alabama on Saturday night. Keep it locked here for live updates, highlights and more throughout the game.

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University Heights’ finances looking better after city takes in additional $461,000 in CARES Act money

UNIVERSITY HEIGHTS, Ohio — Although it is uncertain what lies ahead, the city’s finances are looking a lot better these days after University Heights recently received an additional $461,000 in federal CARES Act money to help it deal with COVID-related expenses.

Gov. Mike DeWine, by signing into law House Bill 614 Oct. 1 allowed for the distribution of an additional $650 million to local governments across Ohio, bringing the total of money distributed to Ohio governments to $1.2 billion. The added $461,000 means that University Heights has now received just over $1.1 million in relief money.

“At first, we didn’t know if we’d get any (CARES Act) money,” said Mayor Michael Dylan Brennan. But, now that the city has been granted the money, Brennan, in his report at the start of Monday’s (Oct. 5) City Council meeting, told of how the aid has significantly closed the gap on what was once a projected $2-million deficit the city faced.

With the added funding, Brennan also plans to pay city employees money they had to forego by working four-day weeks over the course of 20 weeks, beginning in June. Brennan announced at the council meeting that the furloughs, that were to carry on until Oct. 31, were ending earlier than planned.

Initially, when faced with a possible $2-million shortfall, the administration and council worked to reduce the city’s spending by about $1 million. The reduction was made, among other things, by putting off this year’s road repair program, instituting the furloughs, and, due to the pandemic, not having to spend money on opening the city’s pools or in programming summer activities.

“While tax revenues remain down from this point last year,” Brennan reported to council, “for everything we have been through, we are down just 1 percent from this time last year. Rather than $2 million, we are down overall approximately $250,000 from original projections.

“The $1.06 million in budget cuts we made in June more than cover that, though many of those things are expenses that were deferred, like the roads program. The actions we took in June did not contemplate the receipt of CARES Act money. We hoped for such funds, we could not assume we would received them.”

Recent changes in U.S. Treasury guidelines for spending CARES Act money allow the city to use the funds to restore municipal operations, instead of having to spend the money on only COVID-related expenses.

“After consulting with the vice mayor (Michele Weiss), our finance director (Dennis Kennedy) and law director (Luke McConville), effective with the pay period ending Oct 3, the furlough and salary reductions are ended, and the full salaries and wages of the affected employees are restored,” Brennan announced. “Council members received an email this afternoon (Oct. 5) from the finance director: those of us elected officials who took a voluntary reduction need simply confirm to the finance director that you are waiving no further income from our positions.

“What does this mean for the public? For one thing,