The Science of Trade Marketing – Issue 1: Introduction and Strategy

What Is Trade Marketing?

We better get this answered before we go any further. While it has similar processes, Trade Marketing is distinct from Brand Marketing in a very important way. Trade Marketing is focused on marketing to your supply chain rather than to consumers. Quite simply, it is how you market your products and services to the customer base that will enable access to the end consumers that your Brand team is trying to attract. Trade Marketing creates access and distribution.

Importance of a Trade Strategy

In far too many companies, the Trade Strategy consists of hiring some salespeople and letting them run around trying to sell to any customers or prospects that will take an appointment. While this will definitely get results, they won’t necessarily be good ones and it is an extremely inefficient model to follow. If your resources are unlimited, by all means flounder about. For those of us with a budget, however, it is best to formulate a strategy

There are several important components to an effective Trade Strategy including Trade Communications, Trade Events, Trade Programs and Trade Coverage. For this article series, we’re going to focus on the most important component, Trade Coverage, and the associated processes. I call it the most important because it involves the bulk of the resource time for your entire sales structure. The two reasons this is so important is because 1) they represent a very large percentage of the SG&A dollars for any organization, and 2) they represent the entire communication and relationship pipeline to all your customer and prospects. With that much at stake, you better make an attempt to get it right.

Components of Your Strategy

When people hear strategy they start thinking about an elaborate scheme that will be the silver bullet their organization uses to slay the competition. Think again. There are no silver bullets and the simpler your strategy is the better. The more complex your strategy gets the more difficult it becomes to understand, communicate and implement. Pick a simple strategy and stick with it.

With that said, here are the basic components of a simple Trade Strategy.

  • Who Are You Going to Call On – This is the definition of your universe. It is a list of attributes rather than a list of actual customers or prospects. It would include things like the geography, channel, type (e.g. wholesale or retail), etc.
  • Who Is Going To Call On Them – This is the definition of your Customer Touch Points and processes. It would include options such as field sales reps, telesales/telemarketing reps, customer service or technical reps and management structure.
  • How Are You Going To Call On Them – This is the definition of your Sales and/or Call Process. It would include options such as a specific selling methodology or step-by-step process for making a call.
  • When Are You Going To Call On Them – This is a definition of your call prioritization as opposed to a time of day or year.

Herbal Remedies – Ancient Wisdom Now Tested By Science

Herbal remedies have been known to man for thousands of years, right from early civilization, though it is impossible to put a date on their discovery. The oldest records of herbs being used as medicines date as far back as 2800 BC; these records were discovered in China.

It is well known that people belonging to Persia, India, China, Egypt and even the Red Indians (America) used herbal extracts to treat the ailing members of their community. Scientists also have evidence that animals, especially apes, know about the medicinal properties of some plants and therefore, scientists reason that herbs could have been used as medicine even before the first human evolved on our planet.

After humans discovered the medical values ​​of plants, herbal medicine became part of folklore and it spread by word of mouth and other antiquated means of communication through the centuries. In the 15th century, the printing press was invented, which helped in spreading the popularity of herbal medicine – herbal medicine recipes were printed on paper and passed around; naturally, they caught on like wildfire. By the 17th century herbal medicine was all over the place. Then allopathic medicines caught on and proponents of the allopathic chain of thought rubbished herbal medicine and claimed that it was too weak as compared to the stronger and effective allopathic medicines.

In 1985 the World Health Organization (WHO) was of the view that herbal medicines are an important constituent of health-care. Even today, debate rages on over the efficacy of herbal medicines. Here are a few herbs which natural healing properties have been scientifically validated:

Ephedrine was an early asthma drug that was derived from the herb, Ephedra.

The plant Meadowsweet contains salicyclic acid and polyphenols – salicyclic is related to aspirin and polyphenols protect the stomach.

St. John's Wort is known to be effective in treating depression.

The plant, Echinacea, has been proven to be effective in boosting the immune system.

Garlic is recognized for its effective cholesterol-lowering qualities.

The goodness of ginger helps protect against heart disease and fight cholesterol too.

Digoxin, a heart medicine, comes from the foxglove plant; Quinine, used to treat malaria, comes from the bark of the Cinchona tree; and, Morphine, the painkiller, comes from the poppy plant.

Although herbal medicines are effective, doctors prefer to stick to the regular medicines because there are many unknown quantities of herbs that still need to be known. Only time and effort will tell how and when the medicinal properties of herbs are fully understood. …

Financial Education 101 – For Sovereign Wealth and Emergency Financial Preparedness

It is similar. As a culture and a society we have not been very well financially educated. At times it is important to cut through all the confusion and get down to the basics of financial knowledge and financial security to help lead us into sovereign wealth. Do you know the old saying, "a dollar just does not buy what it used to", well, keep that in mind as you read this article.

The question was posed to me, "How does the value of a dollar relate to a declining economy?" And the simple answer to that is, "what can it by you?" It's all about PURCHASING POWER. Think commodities, the simple things that make your life easier. The oil that makes the gas that drives your car. The food ingredients to the meals that fuel your body. The materials used to dress you and your family.

Now if you have ever held stocks, more definitively, a stock which has split, you get double the amount of shares, although each share only has half of its buying power. For instance, if you have 100 shares at $ 100 dollars, and it splits, well then suddenly you have 200 shares at $ 50. It's the same with the value of the dollar or any other fiat currency.

There are essentially 2 reasons why the value of a fiat currency (aka the dollar) will lose its value.

  1. The amount of dollars increases in circulation (ex- the federal reserve printing money out of thin area often to cover outstanding debts to other countries – think China)
  2. A decreasing demand for that said fiat currency (ex- the United States dollar, when steeped in so much debt, other countries or loaner's lose faith on ever being paid back, will stop buying into it – think China)

So now, say that the same example happened with the dollar as did the stock in our above example of a stock split. Either supply doubles or demand gets cut in half, and the value of our dollar is cut in half. Now when you want to go out and fuel your car, feed your family, or cloth yourself … you dollar will only buy half as much as before, so "a dollar just does not buy what it used to." This is an important basic of knowledge to keep in mind when planning for your financial security, especially when speaking of growing sovereign wealth and planning for emergency financial security. …

Quick and Easy Homeschool Science Aeronautics Experiments

Every flying thing, whether it’s an airplane, spacecraft, soccer ball, or flying kid, experiences four aerodynamic primary forces: lift, weight, thrust and drag.

An airplane uses a propeller or jet engine to generate thrust. The wings to create lift. The smooth, pencil-thin shape minimizes drag. And the molecules that make up the airplane attributes to the weight.

Let’s find out what are all the parts of an airplane for. You’ll need to get a cheap balsa wood airplane for this next part – check out your local drug store or toy store. I’ve even found them in grocery stores for about $2.

Take the balsa wood airplane and try to fly just the body (no wings or fins). It flips all over the place. Try flying just the large wing (no body). Somersaults!

Now slide the large wing into the body and fly (fewer somersaults, but still sickening to fly in!).

Now add a horizontal stabilizer (elevator) tail, and when you throw it, add a slight curve so the plane “fishtails” in the air (like a car)… but did you notice that there are no more somersaults?

Add the vertical tail (rudder) and see how it now steers straight no matter how to curve-throw it.

Sneaky Tip: if you remove the metal clip on the nose beforehand, you can add it last to really see what it’s for… notice where most of the weight is without the clip?

Let’s make more things that demonstrate these flying ideas!

Helicopters: Cut out a paper rectangle 5 by 2 inches. Cut lengthwise down the strip, stopping about an inch before the end. Tape this uncut inch to the end tip of a popsicle stick. Fold the “bunny-ear” flaps down in opposite directions. Throw off a balcony and watch it whirl and gyrate! (Optional: You can notch the end of the popsicle stick to make a sling-shot helicopter. Make a quick slingshot launcher by looping a rubber band to another popsicle stick end.)

Butterfly Cups: Tape two Dixie paper cups together, bottom-to-bottom. Chain together six rubber bands. Loop one end of the rubber band chain over your thumb and hold your arm out horizontally straight, palm up. Drape the remainder of the chain along your arm. Place the taped butterfly cups at the free end (near your shoulder) and slowly wind the rubber bands around the middle section of the cups. When you wind near the end, stop, stretch the chain back toward your elbow, make sure the rubber band comes from the underside of the cups and release. The cups should rotate quickly and take air, then gracefully descend down for a light landing. Try making one with four cups.

Hot Air Balloons: Shake out a garbage bag to its maximum capacity. Tape (use duct or masking tape) the open end almost-closed… you still want a small hole the size of the hair dryer nozzle.

Use the hair dryer to inflate the bag and heat the air inside (make sure you don’t melt …