Mystical Physicists

INSPIRATIONAL COMMENTS:

“There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance – that principle is contempt prior to investigation. – Herbert Spencer”

Albert Einstein – “We are seeking for the simplest possible scheme of thought that will bind together the observed facts.”

“If we do not expect the unexpected, we will never find it.” – Heraclitus

“Human beings, by changing the inner attitudes of their minds, can change the outer aspects of their lives.” – William James

“I feel that if we could be serious for an hour and really fathom, delve into ourselves as much as we can, we should be able to release, not through any action of will, a certain sense of energy that is awake all the time, which is beyond thought.” – Jiddhu Krishnamurti, Madras, 1961

Heraclitus: “… conceded the existence of an over-riding, all-encompassing unity, in which the apparently contradictory opposites are all linked to one another, in a single, regular, cohesive system of balanced, harmonious measure and just order.”

“Consciousness is a singular of which the plural is unknown. There is only one thing, and that which seems to be a plurality is merely a series of different aspects of this one thing, produced by a deception, the Indian maya, as in a gallery of mirrors.” – Erwin Schrödinger

I think this means that all the talk about anomalous or truthful science is a bunch of you know what from the ego of man. We are ‘connected’ and our real self is not our ego. I am also of the opinion that he sees something I think is the nature of reality about the personality that some insist continues in such things as past-life regressions. Yes, perhaps through limbo and obsessions some things stay in this materially focused frame of reference (I have performed exorcisms) but when we are reborn all those memories of other lives are memories of a collective oversoul not anything like an individual soul. Maya and samsara or the ‘busy-mind’ do indeed deceive as he says – and though a few will gain great insight into the plural they will still be far from totally informed. Thus we must be open to all possibilities.

“Inherent to wave mechanics are the mechanisms of wave superposition and parallel and non-linear information processing. And these mechanisms, which are also affected and regulated by the laws of thermodynamics, are responsible for information growth and the evolution of biological matter. Information begets information.” – Laurent from Gaithersburg, Maryland.

INTRODUCTION:

Our reason (philosophy), should concern our ‘selves’ with the field of metaphysics. Metaphysics is the study of three entities: the ‘individual being’, the universe or what we call reality and what lies beyond the universe. Metaphysics is the study of how and why the ‘individual being’, the universe, and what lies beyond the universe interact with each other. Metaphysics is the study of whether or not …

How to Write a College Entrance Essay

There are thousands of books and articles with suggestions and tips on how to write a college entrance essay. Why write one more article on this topic? Well, the increase of competition for better colleges boosts the role of essays. Beside, fashion changes with the time flow. Old approaches and tricks do not impress announcement officers. Therefore, this article will briefly stay upon some current critical aspects of successful essay writing.

To write a college entry essay effectively, it is necessary to accomplish two goals:

  1. Show a college admission officer that you are going to be a worthy student.
  2. Demonstrate your preparation for college-level work.

To accomplish these goals you should:

  • Write about something you know well, something that actually happened to you and changed you in a positive way. A reader of your essay should gain favorable impression about you, so that he likes you.
  • Choose a topic that interests you and shows your academic abilities. It could be a good idea to use a story you told your friends that kept their attention.
  • Avoid "global", "clever" and popular topics unless you have something really new and fresh to tell about them. Otherwise, whatever you write will look like repeating common thoughts and ideas. Remember that your story should have a sound plot and be entertaining.

Undoubtedly, choosing a good topic is important to write a wrought college entrance essay, but without engaging writing style your paper will be dull and tedious. Try to give specific and even naive details. It will make your story livelier and win the favor of college admissions officers. The flow of your essay should be smooth and logical. Overall, avoid passive voice; it is more appropriate in scientific papers. Keep the sentences short and unambiguous. Do not try to seem smart and clever, be yourself. Use synonyms instead of repeating the same words, except you deal with science. Avoid using standard phrases and clichés.

Structure your Essay in a Proper Way:

  1. Introduction is a very important element of a college entrance essay. It should give the main idea of ​​your essay, entice the interest of the readers, and create an intrigue. Often, it is easier to write the introduction at the end.
  2. In the body of your college entry essay, show the ability to prove your point. Avoid ambiguity, skepticism, and uncertainty. Stick to the idea given in the introduction and develop it with the help of vivid and specific facts, events, quotations, examples, and reasons. Everything you write must be aimed at proving a single point or thesis.
  3. Conclusion presents an opportunity to give final arguments in support of the thesis. It should create a lasting impression and accomplish two goals of the college admissions essay.

Admissions officers, counselors, and teachers agree that the most important criteria to write personal college entrance essays are correctness, organization, specific evidence, and an individual style. Do your best to show that you are good at all that and good luck with your admission to college! …

Top Universities in Singapore – NUS and NTU

Undoubtedly the top ranked universities in Singapore are NUS and NTU!

National University of Singapore

National University of Singapore (NUS) is ranked 33 in the Times Higher Education Supplement’s World University Rankings 2007.

According to the Financial Times (FT) 2006 EMBA ranking of the Top 85 EMBA programs, NUS Business School rises in rankings for Executive MBA programs to be among world’s Top 29.

NUS Business School did extremely well in two of the sub-categories – it came out Top 5 for the categories of ‘International Attendees’, and ‘Top Salaries in IT/ Telecommunications’.

According to the THES 2006 World Ranking in the field of technology, NUS Faculty of Engineering ranked 8th in the World’s top 100 in Technology

According to the Newsweek Ranking of Global University, NUS is ranked 36th in the top 100 universities.

Nanyang Technological University

Nanyang Technological University (NTU) is the world’s top 20 technological university!

According to the Times Higher Education Supplement’s World University Rankings 2007, NTU is ranked 69 in the world.

The university has 2 campuses in Singapore: NTU at one-north campus and the Yunnan Garden campus. NTU at one-north campus is located next to Biopolis, the Singapore biomedical research hub. NTU has strong reputation overseas, linkages with world famous universities such as University of Washington, Stanford University, MIT, Cambridge, to name a few.

It offers undergraduate and graduate courses in Accountancy, Business, Communication Studies, Engineering, Science and Arts.

The university is recognized globally for its excellence in science and engineering. The College of Engineering is one of the world largest engineering colleges, with 6 engineering schools offering a variety of programs and specializations to meet the needs of many students.

It is also home to the National Institute of Education (NIE), which is the only teacher training institute in Singapore. NIE provides educational services to countries such as Indonesia and Saudi Arabia.

The College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences is the first Singapore professional art school offering courses in art, design and media.

Nanyang Business School (NBS) offers one of the world top 100 MBA programs. According to the Financial Times survey (published in Jan 2007), its MBA program is ranked Number 1 in Singapore and Number 2 in Asia.…

Gulliver’s Travel As a Symbolical Work

Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) was an author, journalist, and political activist. He is best known for his satirical novel Gulliver’s Travel and satirical essay on the Irish famine, “A Modest Proposal.” ‘Gulliver’s Travels’ is a book of fantasy, satire and political allegory, and it is much liked in all ages. He wrote Gulliver’s Travels in 1725, and it was published in 1726. The book got a great success throughout the British Empire and earned the titles of writer and commentator of great quality and reputation for the author. In this book, the travel of Gulliver, a surgeon on a merchant ship, is made to four imaginary countries. So, the book is divided into four parts. His first travel is to Lilliput whose inhabitants are about six inches tall. His second visit is to Brobdingnag, the country of the giants. His third visit is to the Islands of Laputa and Legedo, inhabited by philosophers and scientists, keeping love for music and mathematics. His last visit is to the land of the Honyhnhnms and Yahoos. They are rational and civilized horses, and the yahoos are unreasonable and bestial human beings, completely dirty.

Before discussing the symbols of his work, ‘The Gulliver’s Travel’, we should know something about the literary term ‘symbol’. The word’ Symbol’ is derived from Late Latin word ‘Symbolum’ means token, sign or emblem. It is, indeed, the ornament of literature. The author uses it to expose all the hidden things or the philosophy of work honestly to the readers, as they may not face to any difficulties to be understood. If such thing happened, the work would not be interesting and helpful for representing the age. It is evident that Jonathan Swift has used symbols to convey his ideas to the readers by making it easier with the help of it. Keeping in view all things, we can say that a symbol is something that stands for something else. In Gulliver’s Travels, everything stands for something else because it is written for the purpose of criticizing contemporary philosophies and customs. Nearly every person in this book stands either for a historical figure or for an idea.

Let’s survey the symbols used in his work, The Gulliver’s Travel’.

In the first book, Swift narrates Gulliver’s visit to Lilliputians, the six- inch inhabitants. They represent the symbol of extreme pride of mankind. The author represents the race ironically. He finds that they are small creatures with small minds, but they are the stock of backbiting and conspiracy; despite it, they consider themselves grand. Gulliver comes under the spell of their vain-glory and is made credulous by their threats of punishment, although the race has no real physical power over him. Gulliver learns more about Lilliputians’ culture and the great difference in size between him and the race. It is explicit satire of British government. Gulliver finds Lilliputian government officials are chosen by their skill at rope dancing which is recognized arbitrary and ridiculous. It symbolizes England’s system of political appointment that is …

Technology Used in Astronomy Today

Astronomy is a topic in science. For most of astronomy, there are scientific instruments in use. These can be telescopes, which have different technologies, and also that of using computers. In this article, we will take a look at technology used in astronomy today.

Since the dawn of time, man has looked up at the stars in amazement. What were these shimmering lights in the night sky? A torch to light our way? It certainly has been used for farmers, sailors, and many other areas to determine the seasons and other important aspects, however, let us look at the technology used in astronomy.

What was the technology that stone age man and any man or woman today who looks up at the night sky? What is the principle in what is happening when people observe those objects? For certainly the Sun is not as big as my thumb, but actually a size which could eat up Earth and still be hungry!

The point is simple. The stars and other objects in the sky can be millions of light years away. As you look at these objects the light travels to meet your eye. As it meets your eye, it goes through the pupil of your eye. This is the technology of man, and to see more, you will need more light entering.

If your pupil was as large as the Earth, our Moon would appear to be like your hands in front of you. This means that more light we let in, the more we can see, and the bigger it will appear to be.

This is what astronomers and scientists have dedicated themselves to for years. It makes sense. However, the telescopes of today are not using today’s technology. Yes, many have some new features, but at the back of it all, they pretty much use 2 different systems.

One of the systems is the famous Galileo’s refractor. This works with letting light come through a big lens, and finally through other lenses get focused to meet your eye. What happens here is that you get to see objects far away more magnified. In effect you have increased the pupil of your eye!

Another system that is widely used is Isaac Newton’s system of telescope. This technology used in astronomy telescopes widely available, is that light enters and bounces off a mirror, and comes back up to find another slanted mirror that sends the light through a lens to meet your eye. Again, increasing your pupil in effect, with technology.

There is much more to the technology used in astronomy today. For example, the Hubble Space Telescope and many other astronomical devices. However, one thing that is becoming more common is to utilize a computer which drives the telescope. This has allowed navigation of the night skies to be much more easier than it used to be.…

Types of Online College Nursing Degrees

There are many types of online college nursing degrees out there. The education of a regular RN is never ending either. Many of the online college nursing degrees are out there to help further and advance their education, and to help serve their patients better in the medical field. Some job positions are even required to have a certain degree in order to have the position. Taking these online college nursing degree courses can be beneficial as well especially to the already working nurses who want to advance in their career. Online they can go at their own pace and work it into their own busy schedules.

Online College Nursing Degrees

Master of Science (MS) in Nursing and Special Education: This program is approved by the American Nurses Association. The course available at Walden University and you get your Master's of Science degree in nursing and teaching so you can teach future nurses.

RN to BS in Nursing (BSN): This course is for continuing education for the already RNs who have already gotten their association of degree and hospital diploma. Taking this course will give them a chance to earn their Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN). This Course is available at Walden University as well and University of Phoenix.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN): Here your Master's in Nursing can be earned to become a Registered Nurse. Course available at University of Phoenix.

(MSN) RN Track – Informatics: Available at Walden University this is for RN to expand their knowledge on blending technology and science along with nursing to help improve their patient care.

PHD in Nursing- This degree course is for Certified Nurses to help prepare them to take their master's degree.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) / Master of Health Administration: This is a duel course in which you will earn your MSN as well business skills too to help further their career.

LPN to RN: This is online degree program is where an LPN and get their Masters or Associates in Nursing degree to become an RN.

LPN to BSN: A course for LPN nurses to earn their Bachelor's of Science in nursing which is needed to become a Registered Nurse.

Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) / Nurse Family Practitioner- This is a course for a nurse to get their MSN and also learn skills to become a Nurse Family Practitioners. …

Thinking Out of the Box – Photo-Rejuvenation

The new age of Aquarius with it's new paradigm of the laws of Quantum Physics, has given us the opportunity to climb out of the box. And now that we are out of the box we can start "thinking" outside the box.

We have 2000 years to use the new clear, un-manipulated 'mater' of the Age of Aquarius and create new ideas, new forms, new functions, new realities, more convince to this Age of 'energy. "

The Laws of Quantum Physics tell us that we live more and have our existence in an infinite ocean of thinking, intelligent energy called the Quantum Ocean. Which in reality is the Mind of God. We are also told that All is energy, we are energy and thoughts are energy tools that we use to create what we desire.

Within this Quantum Ocean there is no time, only the Now. Everything that is, was, or will be exists there. It is time for us to understand this and start to think outside the box. We can create huge, wonderful "Will Be's." out of this Quantum Ocean.

No time for timidness or fear. It is time to unwrap your imagination from the fetters of the past and soar high into the rated air of the Now, (Aquarius).

Here is a remarkable 'out of the box thought' that we can all use. Everything that ever was exists in the Quantum Ocean. This means you at age one, or ten, or 20 or 30 exists there.
Right now you are manifesting yourself at the age you are now. The now is all we really have now.

But we have the paradigm of the Laws of Quantum Physics to use other nows. This means that we can manifest the now or "the you" that was younger and in perfect health.

We can take that Perfect You and lie it out over the energy matrix of the Now You. In this way the "Perfect You." Will become the Now You.

How can we do this? Well search your photo album and pick out a photo of yourself that you feel shows you at your healthiest best. A photo, thanks to the laws of Quantum Physics, is an exact energy representation of you. The photo is you. The photo of you in perfect health is actually you in perfect health. Now take the photo and use it to overlay the "now you."

The energies from the "perfect you" will become the "now you."

How can you do this? Well you can use the new Aquarian Age Sciences of Mental Radionics, Orgone Technology or the Science of Radionics. They will all work.

There is no limit to what we can do in the next 2000 years. The only limitation is our own minds. Start your own "thinking big out of the box" ideas. Did you ever hear the story about the man who said it could not be done and was almost run over by the man who was doing it? …

Interview With J Matthew Neal, Author of "Specific Gravity"

Dr. J. Matthew Neal was born in Muncie, Indiana, where he has resided much of his life. Although he has been a medical writer for many years, “Specific Gravity” is his first novel. As a physician and residency program director, he has found plenty of inspiration in the medical field for his fiction.

Tyler: Welcome, Matt. Thank you for joining me today. To begin, I understand “Specific Gravity” is a thriller with Dr. Alexander (Alex) Darkkin as its main character. Will you tell us a little bit about Alex and why you think readers will find him to be an attractive character?

Matt: Alex is a complicated guy with lots of problems, and at first probably won’t seem likeable to readers at all. He’s a brilliant cancer specialist who has also created his own medical software company. He’s good-looking, smart, and has money-but is also an obnoxious, womanizing alcoholic who is unhappy with his superficial life and self-destructing relationships. He’s tried therapy, AA, and religion, none of which seem to be working.

But he has a deeper side that he doesn’t yet realize, and much of the story revolves around his self-reflection and realization that he can do much to help those other than himself. He just needs a special person to show him the way.

Tyler: Is Alex haunted by demons that led him to womanizing and alcoholism? Would you tell us a little bit about his past before the book begins?

Matt: Alex felt he didn’t have a very good paternal role model; his father Conrad was an alcoholic who cheated on Alex’s mother on numerous occasions. His sister left town after high school and developed a relationship with a normal, “surrogate” family (the Mendozas); meanwhile Alex stayed fairly close to home, and lives in Nashville. He never saw his parents in a loving marriage, and as a result, finds it difficult to engage in lengthy relationships. Despite seeming arrogant, he actually suffers from low self-esteem and depression, and this has resulted in dependence on alcohol and frequent one-night stands.

Tyler: What is the situation Alex finds himself in that is the focus of the novel?

Matt:Alex, hoping that a change of location will do him some good, relocates to San Diego for six months to fill in for his sister Wendy’s friend who is taking a sabbatical. After his arrival, he curiously inspects the files of a patient who recently died-billionaire pharmaceutical CEO John Markham. His software background leads him to discover that Markham’s medical records may have been altered, and he comes up with a theory that Markham may in fact have been murdered. Unfortunately, he can’t seem to convince the police or anyone else, and realizes he can’t do it alone. He then reluctantly seeks the aid of Wendy’s best friend, Bonnie Mendoza.

Tyler: Tell us a little bit about Bonnie and her involvement in the story.

Matt: The arrogant Alex finally meets his match in deaf forensic scientist Bonnie Mendoza-a mathematical and lexical genius …

Rhetorical Devices in the Inaugural Address of John F. Kennedy

It is according to Aristotle that a speaker or writer has three ways to persuade his audience: The first kind depends on the personal character of the speaker; the second is on putting the audience into a certain frame of mind; the third is on the proof, or apparent proof, provided by the words of the speech itself.

One of the most influential people who made a memorable speech for the past century is President John F. Kennedy, a famous public speaker who wrote an inaugural address that contains a power to persuade a lot of people.

His well-known speech shows how his method of using the art of persuasive written or spoken discourse (Rhetoric) that an author or speaker uses to convey a meaning to the listener or reader contributes to the purpose or theme of his message for his countrymen.

Definition of Terms:

1. Alliteration: Repetition of consonant sounds at the beginning of words that are close to one another.

2. Allusion: A brief or indirect reference to a person, place, event, or passage in a work of literature or the Bible assumed to be sufficiently well known to be recognized by the reader.

3. Amplification: An expansion of detail to clarify a point.

4. Analogy: A comparison between two things in which the more complex is explained in terms of the more simple.

5. Anaphora: Repetition of one or more words at the head of consecutive phrases, clauses, or sentences.

6. Anastrophe: Inversion of word order to mark emphasis.

7. Antimetabole: Reverasal or repeated words or phrases for effect.

8. Antithesis: Contrast within parallel phrases (not to be confused with the ordinary use of the word to mean “extreme opposite”).

9. Assonance: Repetition of vowel sounds between different consonants.

10. Asyndeton: Absence of conjunctions.

11. Chiasmus: The reversal of grammatical order from one phrase to the next.

12. Climax: Consists of arranging words, clauses, or sentences in the order of increasing importance, weight, or emphasis.

13. Conduplication: Resembles anadiplosis in the repetition of a preceding word, but it repeats a key word (not just the last word) from a preceding phrase, clause, or sentence, at the beginning of the next.

14. Consonance: Repetition of identical consonant sounds within two or more words in close proximity.

15. Ellipsis: Any omitted part of speech that is easily understood in context.

16. Ethos: Makes use of what an audience values and believes to be good or true.

17. Hyperbole: Deliberate exaggeration in order to create humor or emphasis.

18. Imagery: Lively descriptions which impress the images of things upon the mind using one or more of the five senses.

19. Logos: appealing to reason in a measured, logical way.

20. Metanoia: The qualification of a statement to either diminish or strengthen its tone.

21. Metaphor: Meaning or identity ascribed to one subject by way of another.

22. Oxymoron: …

Teaching and Learning Modern Foreign Languages in the United Kingdom Part 1

I.1. Modern Foreign Languages within the curriculum: 1900 – 1988

I.1.a. A curriculum?

Between the1880s and 1904, many pupils had the opportunity of learning a Modern Foreign Language. The main language taught was French; however, German was also taught occasionally. This was the case in most schools existing at the time, although schooling was less compulsory, with compulsory education targeting only a range of students from six to twelve.

In 1904, the Board of Education suppressed Modern Foreign Languages from the curriculum. This lasted for almost 60 years. This had an impact on generations of British pupils, in so far that languages did not appear to be important; and therefore, for years, the British have argued that they were no good at learning them.

The 1944 Education Act was a turning point for the United Kingdom’s educational system. It made school compulsory between the ages of 5 and 15. The Ministry of Education, which had become the Department for Education and Science, introduced the “tripartite system”. Secondary schools were converted into ‘Grammar schools’ for the most able students, the senior schools turned into ‘Secondary Modern Schools’ and had the majority of the students on their roll, and ‘Secondary Technical Schools’ for those with a technical/scientific aptitude were created. The age at which the transition between primary and secondary schools was to be made became more definite in the 1980s, when the different age groups were divided into five Key Stages. Students had to start secondary school at the end of Key Stage 2.

In 1944, the Local Education Authorities provided the facilities and equipment for schools. They also acquired the resources needed and paid teachers. They were to make sure that there was enough space to accommodate all the students between the age of 5 and 15 within the catchment area. They also determined the length of the school day. They had an overview of the curriculum, but no control as such. Over time, the way Local Education Authorities administered their area was very different and the emphasis placed on certain types of school had a tremendous impact on the wider community.

The Secretary of State did not have the legal right to determine the contents of the curriculum. The Department for Education and Sciences’ requests, as far as the curriculum was concerned, were extremely limited except for Religious Studies (daily worship and religious education became statutory). The subjects taught, and the methods and contents, were left to the teaching profession and head teachers. This was the case until the 1980s, though Her Majesty’s Inspectorate and the Office for Standards in Education were inspecting and reporting about schools. No major change happened until 1988.

Therefore between 1904 and 1964, the teaching of languages as we perceive it in 2005 was very limited, in the few schools that offered this option. These were mainly grammar schools or public schools. Indeed, often students were taught only Greek or Latin. Where Modern Foreign Languages were made available, the main skills developed were reading …