Availing Premedical Courses

Students in the pre-medical courses have the opportunity to meet their educational goals at a world-class university. The program admits post-baccalaureate students seeking the laboratory science courses in biology, general and organic chemistry and physics required for the application to most medical, dental, veterinary, and related professional schools. The careers of Pre-medical courses provide a better scope to the interested students to get the numerous leadership positions within the organization allow students the opportunity to enhance their leadership skills for their future profession.

Education requirements

It is designed for students who have sufficient level of English but lack the knowledge of medicine related subjects. After completing the program they have the opportunity to apply for University admission. The Pre-Medical Program provides a smooth adaptation year for all the newcomers. You will meet international students from different cultures in small-size groups. You will get adapted to an independent way of life and you will learn how to prepare yourself for oral and written exams. There is no limit on the time frame during which the courses must be completed, but if you have been out of school for a few years, it is strongly recommended that you have some recent science coursework to demonstrate that you can still do well in a classroom setting.

Duration of the Course

The Pre-medical courses are the one mostly pursued by the interested aspirants to kick start off the career in the field of medical sciences. The duration of the course is mostly from 2 to 3 years which mostly provide you with a degree of Diploma in the field of medical sciences.

Subjects in the Pre-medical Courses

• Physics

• Anatomy

• Biochemistry

• General Biology

• General chemistry

• Genetics

• Biochemistry

Characteristics of a pre-medical aspirant

• Volunteer and job shadow in a variety of medical settings and specialties throughout the college and reputed university career (i.e. primary care physicians, specialties of interest, rural and urban settings, community clinics, dental centers, mission trips abroad, etc.).

• Be actively involved with activities demonstrating social conscience, compassion, and personal character to reflect to prove him.

• Show leadership ability to prove him in the course learning.

• Be active members of the college.

• Develop an ability to communicate with a variety of people in a variety of ways (i.e. written, verbal, non-verbal, technological, etc.) to develop his/her skills.

• Demonstrate the ability to effectively managing time.

Colleges and Universities

There are many medical and pre-medical colleges and universities helping the medical aspirants to get the career of the pre-medical course and to develop a sense of leadership skills and the best of medical specialties so that the medical candidate can sunshine in the colleges and universities. A pre-medical candidate is required to bestow best of quality education from the reputed teachers and professor to help the aspirant get the good grades so that he can outrage his/her career ahead in the form of the medical officer and other higher position.

In my view, …

Why It’s Probably Not Worth Going to University Any More

I’ve been thinking recently, if I was a fresh-faced 18-year-old just out of college with my whole life ahead of me and pondering what to do next, would I go to university? The answer is probably not!

Before I explain, I must insert a disclaimer here that this does not mean that I don’t recommend anyone else to, neither does it rule out me sending my future kids to university. However, as a university graduate of 2004, the more I think about going to university today, the more I find myself wondering what exactly is the point?

My first issue with this age-old institution is the very modern practice of excessively high university fees.

A tax on knowledge?

As of next year, university tuition fees will be rising to a maximum of £9,000 which doesn’t include living expenses, cost of books, and all the other associated costs of student life – it is no wonder the latest UCAS figures show the biggest fall in university applications in more than 30 years!

How it is justifiable to fine, sorry charge, people whopping amounts to educate themselves is completely beyond me. Surely this is some kind of stealth tax on knowledge? From the parent perspective, I can imagine how massive a financial burden this must be, especially where there is more than one university-ready child in the household. These ludicrous fees may well see the UK go down the same route as China in future by adopting a one child policy to keep things affordable.

Forget uni, try YouTube instead!

The second reason I’m somewhat anti-university for now is that thanks to the internet, the world of learning has opened up in so many different and exciting ways that you can pretty much teach yourself anything you want by simply watching YouTube or scouring the pages of Google.

Unlike the somewhat restricted curriculum of a university module, self-taught subjects can be as varied as you like and as long or short as you like, and the best part is most of these online resources are free or low cost so you can save your university fees for your mortgage down payment instead. Also this way, you get to teach yourself subjects that actually affect your day-to-day life such as how to plan and achieve goals, manage your finances, develop a “winning” mindset and so on…

Branson didn’t go uni… and look where it got him

Entrepreneurship is not for the fainthearted but the truth is that it’s becoming more and more of an attractive option for young people who can’t find a job in today’s climate. It makes sense – if some big boss somewhere won’t give you a job, simply create your own!

Richard Branson didn’t go to university and look where it got him; neither did Ingvar Kamprad – the guy who founded IKEA, Simon Cowell who needs no explanation, and countless other entrepreneurs who are today living their own version of “the dream” without first obtaining letters after their …

Education – Your Passport to Success

Never underestimate the importance of education when it comes to getting the job of your dreams. Some people know exactly what they want to be when they “grow up” where as other take time to decide what career that they want to follow.

Getting good grades at High school is imperative to get a place on the course that you want to go on at University but if you don’t it is not the end of the world as re-sits are available to you or you can take access courses that will plump up your grades and help you to gain a place on the University course that you want to take.

There is of course another option when it comes to education – on the job training. This is where an employer takes on an employee on a low ranked position where they will work their way up the ranks going on courses as they go to enable them to eventually take on a position of a higher rank. This option does take years to achieve but it also allows you to understand and appreciate the effort that the “lower” ranked jobs go through allowing you to be a better manager, supervisor or person of authority and standing.

So when you weigh your options up, what should you do? Well, it all depends on what you want the end result to be. Choosing to plan your future based on the goals and ideals that you would like to achieve can be very helpful as it allows you to take an in depth look at the time scale you will need to achieve your dream job on the different routes that you can take. It allows you to decide on trips you may want to take; gap-years you may want to back pack on and allow time to financial plan. Education in some areas cost more than others so making sure you are able to be financially capable of completing your education is important if you are unable to obtain a funding source.

During you time being educated you may find that another interest begins to interest you and if you feel the pull enough to want to change your goal as your desire for success comes from a different field then sit down and re-evaluate your plans, take a long hard look at them and change them if it will gain you more happiness through this new goal.

The same reasoning applies as nothing in life can be expected at all times, sometimes life just happens and you may need to change your plans for those reasons that are beyond your control, the most common of these are personal reasons.

But never lose your way no matter what happens to you in your life as every experience is important and life experience cannot be taught in any classroom. Blips happen in the road but how you get to your eventual successful job is by keeping your dreams alive.…

University of Virginia (UVA) Cavaliers – Nickname Explained

The University of Virginia Cavaliers share a nickname with the Cleveland Cavaliers NBA franchise but that is where the similarities end. The explanation for the University of Virginia Cavaliers nickname actually involves a story of historical significance to the region.

Located in Charlottesville, Virginia the school with a total student population of close to 20,000 is often referred to simply as UVA for short (based on the post office state abbreviation VA for Virginia). The orange and navy blue now worn by the Cavaliers first went into effect in 1888 when athletic teams representing the college used to square off with local YMCA teams for lack of more formal competition. Many people are interested to learn that in the earliest days of collegiate athletics playing games against local YMCA groups was the norm all over the country. In fact, the University of Kentucky basketball program that currently has the most wins of any college team in history began their success with a single victory in the 1903 season against a YMCA squad (the UK team finished a disappointing 1-2 in that first season).

The origin of the Cavaliers nickname comes from what was going on in this region of the world during the seventeenth century when England was involved in a civil war that pitted supporters of the Parliamentary system of government against King Charles I who asserted absolute power in terms of rule. The use of the word Cavalier predates the formation of the United States of America with a very similarly spelled version of the word being used by William Shakespeare in his famed Henry IV play. Shakespeare chose the word to describe a swashbuckler who was not unlike the current University of Virginia mascot that is a sword wielding fellow on horseback. Before being penned by Shakespeare in the final years of the sixteenth century the historic nature of the word Cavaliers dates back to the Spanish word caballeros (translation: horseman) which is actually a derivation of the Latin term caballarius -which has a similar meaning as the Spanish term.

With a solid foundation of the etymology behind the term Cavaliers it is important to understand how it relates to the Virginia program in Charlottesville. Before the days of the American Revolutionary War the modern day state of Virginia was known as the Commonwealth of Virginia. The Commonwealth of Virginia had a reputation of being home to a great many loyalists that were very supportive of the British Crown. When the University of Virginia officially took on the name the Virginia Cavaliers in 1923 it was to pay homage to a bygone era when during the tumultuous seventeenth century British Civil War the good people of the Commonwealth of Virginia aligned themselves with the Royalist supporters who were often referred to as Cavaliers.

The next time you are watching the University of Virginia Cavaliers square off against the University of North Carolina Tar Heels (the oldest rivalry in the South – dating back to 1892) feel free …