Newspaper Reading for Language Students

A Khmer student wrote to me on YouTube and asked me to produce videos about how to read English language newspapers.

“I’d like to ask you to make videos how to read newspaper and translate it from English to Khmer. I Khmer and I having a problem to understand English phrases.” Wrote the student.

Language learners often write telling me about some area of learning or area of their lives where they are experiencing difficulties of comprehension and ask me for a trick or a guide to help them learn.

As I have said in numerous other language learning articles, there are no tricks and no hints. The more hours you invest, the better you will get. And if your goal is to read at a native speaker level, then you need to read things a native speaker reads. If you are a 22 year-old university graduate, then you need to be reading at that level in the foreign language. And you won’t get there by reading textbooks ABOUT the language. You will get there by reading books, articles, and textbooks IN rather than ABOUT the language.

If we analyze this latest email, the student says he has trouble reading, and he specifically singled out newspapers.

Obviously, reading is reading. On some level, reading a newspaper is no different than reading a novel or reading a short story.

If you are reading novels and short stories, you should be able to read newspapers. If I asked this student, however, he is probably is not reading one novel per month in English. If he were, newspaper reading would just come.

Therefore, the problem is not the reading or the newspapers, per se. The problem is the lack of practice.

I never took a course called “Newspaper Reading” in English. I just started reading newspapers. And at first, I had to learn to deal with the language, structure and organization of newspaper writing, but no one taught me, or you. It just came to us. The same was true for German or Spanish newspapers which I can read almost as well as English. No one taught me, or taught Gunther or Pablo, it just came through practice.

A point, that I have made many times in articles, is that when you begin learning a foreign language, you are not an idiot. You are not starting with an empty brain. One reason it takes babies three years to learn their native tongue is because they are also learning what a language is and how language works. You know all of that, and much more. Babies don’t know that there is such a thing as grammar. Every single piece of vocabulary has to be learned. A seven year old may not know the words “population, economy, government, referendum, currency” in his native tongue. So, reading a foreign newspaper would be difficult for him, because reading a newspaper in his mother tongue is difficult for him.

If you are an adult, coming from a developed …

Ohio Schools Award $4 Million to School Districts for Teacher Training in Mathematics and Science

In June 2006, the Ohio schools awarded more than $4 million in competitive grants to school districts across the state. The grants are funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Mathematics and Science Partnership (MSP) program, and authorized by the federal No Child Left Behind Act.

The MSP grants, which are funded throughout the 2006-2007 school year, will give 1,800 teachers in high-need schools in Ohio the opportunity to increase their knowledge of mathematics and science. If MSP funding remains at current levels, the schools grants will be renewable through June 2009, ensuring professional development for as many teachers as possible.

The program partners colleges and universities with high-need school districts to provide the needed training. Their faculty members also will work with teachers to study techniques for implementing the recent Mathematics and Science Academic Content Standard within their students’ coursework. Most Ohio teachers were trained and certified to teach curriculum that focused primarily on arithmetic. Today’s student begins learning algebra, geometry, measurement and the basic concepts of data analysis in the very early grades levels.

The need, according to Susan Rave Zelman, superintendent of public instruction for the Ohio, is simple — strong mathematics and science skills are necessary for today’s students to compete effectively in tomorrow’s workforce. Teachers’ own skills and knowledge must be expanded upon in order to provide the students with an effective curriculum in these crucial subjects.

The Ohio schools received 24 proposals for the grants. The ten grants will address either mathematics development, science development, or a combination of both. The grants encompass partnerships between 15 college/universities and more than 100 high-need school districts within the Ohio schools.

Other Mathematics and Science Partnerships within the Ohio schools include The Mathematics Coaches Project, K-3 Mathematics: The Early Foundation, Middle Grade Mathematics: The Critical Bridge, and the Topics Foundational to Calculus.

The Mathematics Coaches Project. In partnership with Ohio University, mathematics faculty members train kindergarten through sixth-grade teachers to become coaches. They then coach other elementary teachers in high-need Ohio campuses, where student mathematics performance is low and the school is at-risk.

K-3 Mathematics: The Early Foundation. This program helps kindergarten through third-grade teachers obtain a deeper understanding of early-grade mathematics skills. Additionally, they are taught to use inquiry and concrete experiences of the children within their teaching.

Middle Grade Mathematics: The Critical Bridge. The Middle Grade Math program prepares Ohio schools fourth through eighth-grade teachers to help their students grasp the increasingly complex principles of mathematics. The program includes expanding the teachers’ knowledge and instructional approach.

Topics Foundational to Calculus. For eighth through twelfth-grade mathematics teachers, this program highlights the essential foundations of algebra, geometry and trigonometry for preparing students for calculus coursework.

Unlike previous statewide teacher development programs, the new Ohio schools initiatives emphasize sustained partnerships at the local level. They increase the training time frame to at least 80 hours in the first year and 40 hours in the second year. Programs now include measurements to determine changes in Ohio schools teachers’ content …

Liberty University Online – 3 Review Tips That Help You

If you have just a few minutes, you can unforgettable important information about Liberty University Online – all because of a few short but critical facts you'll learn today. If you are thinking about attending Liberty University or would simply like to learn more read one.

Tip 1 – Research The School's History

As a private, fundamentalist Baptist institution, Liberty is the largest Christian University on the planet. In fact, as of the spring of this year, the school has over 50,000 students enrolled units online program. This is a long way from the former institution founded by Jerry Falwell in the early 1970s (1971 to be exact) when the school was created in Lynchburg, Virginia and known as the Lynchburg Baptist College. If you are serious about investing gating schools like Liberty University Online, you should be well aware of its history. Because in fact it can influence your decision making process. Does that make sense? Good.

Tip 2 – Understand The Admission Process Basics

A potential student can submit an application to Liberty University through sending a new paper request as well as finishing a strong application on the internet. The existing program rate will be $ 30, but LU usually waives the fee for significant periods of time during high college application deadline times. The application has required questions about your personal information, background information, educational background, academic background, enrollment status, housing requirements, and need for federal aid. There is also an optional section regarding church affiliation. A 250 word essay, with a new topic every year, high school and college transcripts, and SAT / ACT scores are also required. Once all the information has been received, it usually only takes a few weeks for LU to notify a student of acceptance

Tip # 3 – Keep in Mind The Costs

The cost of being a student Liberty University can appear to be rather steep when you first look at them. But when you do your research, it becomes obvious that these costs are often quite lower than your typical 4 year private university that's considered a popular school. Some of the costs are in the following range:

Tuition (12-18 credits): $ 6850 +

Room and Board: Main Campus: $ 2700 +

Quads: $ 3000 +

Campus East: $ 3450 +

Student Activity Fee: $ 175 (often less)

Technology Fee: $ 250

Vehicle Registration Fee: $ 75

Here's the thing, if you faith is important and you really want to feel the fulfillment of studying at a Christian University or top bible focused school, you need to find out what the differences are between the top school and who is accredited or not. This could save you a lot of time, money and unwanted hassles and you'll be glad you did. …

Early History of Oxford University

There has been a passing around Oxford since Roman times. However nothing permanent was established until about 700 AD when the hamlet of Oxnaforda became a strategic place between the kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex. After the Norman request the town was fortifies from about 1070. Some of these city walls remain and one of the mounds is still in existence (by the Old Prison)

Origins of the University.

The first evidence of learning in Oxford could be traced back to 720 AD when the local ruler King Didan founded a nunnery for his devout daughter Frideswide. This was built in the grounds of Christ Church Cathedral. This nunnery later dissected but it was taken over by a community of Anglican monks in about 1120. They rebuilt the chapel and dedicated the church to St Frideswide. This was the foundation for Christ Church Cathedral.

By 1167 there were 3 small monastic schools of learning in Oxford, of which the community in Christ Church was one. Around this time of 1167 many English schools were forced to flee the University of Paris. The current King, Henry II encouraged many of these to come to Oxford and continue their studies. The patronage of Henry II was important for the development of Oxford as a seat of learning.

The schools welcomed the traditional curriculam from Paris. All learning was under the Chuch of Rome and all scholars and Masters were in holy orders and used to wear a long black gown. These scholars were not of the nobility but often from humble origins but they played an important role in the administration of the state being the small% of the literate population.

In 1214 Oxford was recognized as a university by the Church and the first Chancellor was appointed. This attracted many scholars to come. These young boisterous schools often created friction and conflict with the local towns people and during this century there were frequently "town versus gown" riots which left a couple of people dead. Because of this many schools moved to other towns such as Cambridge leading to the formation of other universities.

In the 13th Century many masters created halls of residence to protect scholars from local hostility. Also in the 13th century there appeared the first of the University colleges. Colleges were different to the halls of residence because they were not tied to the monastic tradition. In fact many colleges preverted their members from taking monastic vows. This enabled more adventurous teaching than in the monastic halls. The colleges were like a secular response to the monastic halls of residence.

Oxford Colleges were usually founded by rich churchmen who had no offspring to leave their wealth. Thus it was seen as a commendable act to create a college and endow it with wealth. Because of their greater wealth and permanence the colleges flourished and gradually began to overtake and absorb the smaller, more impermanent halls.

The first 3 colleges to be set up were University college, Merton …

Prevent Mold! Hygrometer Calibration

I work with hygrometers frequently in my role as a home inspector. Consumer quality hygrometers and / or relative humidity gauges are inexpensive and infamous for inaccurate readings. That is too bad because maintaining the proper relative humidity at your home is a good start in discouraging fungal growth or even mold. Mold may be hard to identify and it is, typically, excluded on home inspection reports. However, if an inspector sees mold he or she will normally mention it. Most experts recommend that relative humidity in a home be maintained between 30% and 50%, with 60% seldom being a cause for concern. You can go online and find hundreds of articles explaining the reasons for this and suggesting optimistic readings for your particular climate. You could also get that information from a university extension service in your area. Once you have that target percentage, customized for your climate and region, the simple procedures below will allow you to make sure that the readings you get from your hygrometer are reasonable and accurate at all times.

Calibrating a Hygrometer:

If you have a digital hygrometer or humidity gauge and wish to accurately calibrate it, without having to purchase expensive manufacturer-supplied salt calibration kits, here is the easy solution. The physics behind this project is simple and reliable: Different salts, when mixed with water to create a sludge or slurry, will generate a consistent and predictable moisture.

Simplified scientific explanation:

A resolved solution at a stable temperature and pressure has a fixed composition and a fixed vapor pressure. Thus, at constant temperature, no matter how much salt and how much water are present, the (RH) relative humidity that is produced is fixed, just as long as both the water and the solid phase are present. So, without the water dries up, or the salt is made so wet that it liquefies, a predetermined humidity can be produced.

It is convenient for us that a solution of ordinary salt mixed with water (preferably distilled water) produces a predictable humidity over a wide range of temperatures. The humidity created, with ordinary salt (Sodium Chloride) and water, is 75.29% at an ideal temperature of 77 degrees Fahrenheit. The temperature of the room is not critical for our purposes. For example, the RH is quite stable even with large variations: Salt solution at 59 degrees Fahrenheit will produce 75.61% RH and at 86 degrees Fahrenheit the RH is 75.09%.

To calibrate the lower end, 33% humidity, Magnesium chloride (a salt) and water is used again. At the ideal temperature of 77 degrees Fahrenheit, this solution will produce an RH of 32.78%. At 59 degrees Fahrenheit it will produce an RH of 33.30% and at 86 degrees Fahrenheit it will produce 32.44% RH. Once again, "room temperature" is not critical.

Detailed calibration procedures:

With most professional instruments, it is recommended that they are calibrated at both a low point and a higher reference point. For convenience, most manufacturers have selected 75% and 33% RH as the …

Bettering Brazil’s Education to Solidify Economic Growth

*** THE MODERN DAY BRAZILIAN EDUCATION SYSTEM ***

Long criticised as being comparatively inferior (particularly for the lower demographic of society) to other developing countries, Brazil has a long way to go before its compulsory education system is where it needs to be in terms of both improving the competitive intelligence of future generations and reducing poverty. The Instituto de Pesquisa Econ 244;mica Aplicada indicated that the average 25-year-old in modern day Brazil has only nine years of education; 10 percent of the population is illiterate and one-in-five students are in the wrong grade for their age because they have had to repeat a year of studies.

Nevertheless, Brazil does has positive educational results for the last thirty years and quantitative studies at the elementary level have demonstrated that standards are improving (albeit slowly). Research by the Instituto Brasileiro de Geographia e Estat 237;stica (IBGE) indicated that the issue of poor educational levels is mainly symptomatic in rural areas: statistics published in late 2007 stated that the rural population over 15 years has a mean 4.3 years of schooling while the urban mean is 7.7 years. The illiteracy rate in the rural sector is 30 percent for those over the age of 15 and only 27 percent of the 15-17 rural age group are choosing to remain in secondary education.

Conversely, World Bank data in late 2008 demonstrated that the most progress in elementary schooling between 1992 and 2001 was within the poorer part of the population (enrollment in primary education increased from 97 to 99 for the richest 20 per cent of Brazil and from 75 to 94 percent for the poorest 20 percent). The same research pointed to the fact that; because illiteracy ranges from 2.7 percent for the population aged 15-19 to 30 percent for those between 65-69; the educational dynamics of the population look set to change over time.

The number young Brazilians going to university has also increased (enrollments were 1.7 million in 1994 rising to 4.9 million 2008) – however, this statistic remains lower than other countries in South American such as Argentina and Chile.

*** THE FUTURE OF BRAZIL’S EDUCATION SYSTEM ***

Whilst Goldman Sachs was the one of the first international investment banks to tout Brazil as a future economic superpower, it has also pointed to the fact that improvements in education are fundamental for the country to be able to maximise its future potential. It is widely thought that the average standards do not match the increasing relevance the country has on a global scale. In the medium to long term, it is imperative that Brazil’s welfare state decreases and the knowledge and skills base of the country improves.

One positive step has been to encourage more teachers to enter the profession which, in the past, has been under supplied. The setting of the salary floor at $BRL 950 per month received criticism for being too broad based and not tailored to individual municipalities (although was generally seen as a step …

The History of Video Conferencing – Moving Ahead at the Speed ​​of Video

No new technology develops smoothly, and video conferencing had more than its share of bumps along the way before becoming the widely used communications staple it is today. The history of video conferencing in its earliest form goes back to the 1960's, when AT & T introduced the Picturephone at the World's Fair in New York. While viewed as a fascinating curiosity, it never became popular and was too expensive to be practical for most consumers when it was offered for $ 160 a month in 1970. Commercial use of real video conferencing was first realized with Ericsson's demonstration of the first trans-Atlantic LME video telephone call. Soon other companies began refining video conferencing technologies, including such advances as network video protocol (NVP) in 1976 and packet video protocol (PVP) in 1981. None of these were put into commercial use, however, and remained in the laboratory or private company Use. In 1976, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone established video conferencing (VC) between Tokyo and Osaka for company use. IBM Japan followed suit in 1982 by establishing VC running at 48000bps to link up already already established IBM video conferencing links in the United States so that they could have weekly meetings. The 1980's introduce commercial video conferencing in 1982, Compression Labs introduces their VC system to the world for $ 250,000 with lines for $ 1,000 an hour. The system was huge and used massive resources capable of tripping 15 amp circuit breakers. It was, however, the only working VC system available until PictureTel's VC hit the market in 1986 with their substantially cheaper $ 80,000 system with $ 100 per hour lines. In the time in between these two commercially offered systems, there were other video conferencing systems developed that were never offered commercially. The history of video conferencing is not complete without mentioning these systems that were either prototypes or systems developed specifically for in-house use by a variety of corporations or organizations, including the military. Around 1984, Datapoint was using the Datapoint MINX system on their Texas camp, and had provided the system to the military. In the late 1980's, Mitsubishi began selling a still-picture phone that was basically a flop in the market place. They dropped the line two years after introducing it. In 1991, the first PC based video conferencing system was introduced by IBM – PicTel. It was a black and white system using what was at the time an incredibly inexpensive $ 30 per hour for the lines, while the system itself was $ 20,000. In June of the same year, DARTnet had successfully connected a transcontinental IP network of over a dozen research sites in the United States and Great Britain using T1 trunks. Today, DARTnet has evolved into the CAIRN system, which connotes dozens of institutions. CU-SeeMe revolutionizes video conferencing One of the most famous systems in the history of video conferencing was the CU-SeeMe developed for the MacIntosh system in 1992. Although the first version did not have audio, it was …

How to Choose an Online School

The considerations for choosing an online school are the same, whether it’s for acquiring a high school diploma or a college degree. The only difference is that there are four types of virtual high schools to choose from — private, public, chartered and university sponsored – and it is possible that geography will be a factor (e.g. charter schools are available only to students living in a certain area). Being familiar with these types can help parents and students in their decision.

That aside, the first thing to assess is whether the school offers or specializes in the program that the student wants to pursue. For instance, it might be better to get a nursing degree from a school that specializes in medical fields. Also consider that some schools offer only certificates, not diplomas.

The program offerings meet the requirements, but are the schools properly accredited? The accreditation should include oversight by recognized creditors and not just a license to operate. This ensures that parents and students will not spend money, time and resources on a diploma mill or an illegitimate operation.

Having found an online school with the right programs and proper accreditation, it is time to look at the price. Aside from tuition, are there hidden costs; technology fees, graduation fees, etc? It is also a good idea to ask if there are discounts, scholarships or financial assistance options available.

Studying the curriculum and learning about the school’s credit transfer policies can reduce costs and the time it takes to earn a diploma. Some schools allow students to skip courses already taken in another institution. Others offer credit for real-life work experience.

Knowing how classes are conducted will also help in decision-making, since the process should fit the student’s learning style and schedule. Things like teacher-to-student ratio, learning format and support for struggling students should be considered. It also pays to ask about the qualifications of online teaching staff, as well as opportunities to attend a demo class.

Next, examine the school’s track record. The longer the school has been in business, the better. Aside from the number of students currently enrolled or the number of graduates, parents and students should also try to find out the quality of graduates the school has produced. For instance, how many students from the virtual high school went on to college? What is the drop-out rate?

Finally, parents and students can get additional feedback from current and past students and faculty. Other sources include online discussion boards and blogs on online schools. The important thing is to take time and exert effort to get to know several prospective schools before making a decision, instead of settling for the first school that seems to meet all the requirements.…

Destruction Of the Rain Forest – Not All Acai Products Are Equal

The Amazon encompasses 1.2 billion acres on the South American continent’s north side of which the part is in Brazil and covers almost one half of that extensive country. Tha matter of fact is, the Amazon and its fertile ground for various plants and animals that thrive in its exotic climate, that the products from the Amazon are better than what we call organic – they are wild. Things that grow in the wild are strong in their own defense mechanisms to fight against insects and all manners of combatants, as a result. Amazon products such as the Brazil nut, guarana, and the Acai berry being recognised for their complex make up and concentrated nutritional values.

Destruction of rain forest!

Deforestation of the Amazon rain forest reached its highest in the years of 2004 and 2005. Satellite photos show loggers burned and cut down a near record over 10.000 square miles of rain forest in 2004 alone.

One of the main reasons is the world demand for heart-of-palm which is a Salad Garnish. It was known, poachers were illegally chopping down 5,000 to 10,000 palm trees a week. This was just to get the 30 to 40 cm (12 to 16 inch) section found near the crown of a 20 meter (65 foot) palm tree.

Just for this delicacy one poacher would have chopped down an average of 50 trees a day only to earn roughly $1 for every tree from which the heart-of-palm was removed. Once the heart is removed, the tree dies and rots.

The harvest of a palm tree that has grown for over 100 years has just enough of this delicacy to fill two 14-oz cans of heart-of-palm. This would retail in a supermarket for less than $5.00 per can. To feed salad bars and salad connoisseurs world-wide, is this worth such destruction of the palm and the rain forest? It is particularly a waste because the heart-of-palm has no particular nutritional value beyond its fiber.

This is not the case with the Acai berry which has significant nutritional density and the harvesting of it is a complete different approach.

Harvesting the Acai this way may safe the jungle!

Because of the huge interest and demand of the Acai berry, this has started to help the locals to realize that cutting down these precious palm trees just for a few inches of the top core of the tree was no longer a solution, and found that there are better options available. Every palm tree produces an abundant crop of Acai fruit twice a year. Within a few years, the value of the palm fruit itself exceeded by far the value of removing the top core of the palm just for the use as a salad garnish.

Therefore, a legitimate reason was found not to cut down those trees by harvesting the Acai berry another way.

Laborers now climb high into the 90-foot palm to collect what is known as the Black Pearl of the Amazon.

As …

UPenn – University of Pennsylvania

UPenn is the shortened version of the more formal University of Pennsylvania full name given to the private college located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The school that is also commonly referred to simply as Penn is a prestigious school that predates the formation of the United States of America.

UPenn was originally known as the Academy of Philadelphia when the Church of England influenced school first opened its doors in 1740. Being one of the nine oldest institutions of higher learning in North America garners UPN the privilege of being among the select few schools that can claim membership in the group known as the Colonial Colleges. Seven of the nine Colonial Colleges went on to become members of the highly touted academic grouping known as the Ivy League when eight schools officially formed an athletic conference by that name in 1954.

Many schools are named after their founders or significant donors and since a very high profile founder in Benjamin Franklin this was not the case at UPenn which chose to go with a very simplistic and appropriate title. Upenn enthusiasts curious about the etymology of the world Pennsylvania will be interested to know that the word is derived from the name British King Charles II chose for the land he gave William Penn when repaying a debt owed to William's father, Admiral William Penn Sr. The word "Pennsylvania" means Penn's Woods, a name William Penn Jr. was initially uncomfortable with for understandable fear of embarrassment over the allegation that he had named the state after himself. King Charles II refused to change the name and the stubbornness of his 1681 naming decision has drawn centuries with no end in sight.

Being the practical man that he was Benjamin Franklin intended for UPenn to concentrate as much on commerce and business as the arts and theology. While it is now commonplace for highly regarded universities to offer undergraduate programs in specialties like engineering and business this was not always the case. For much of history the purpose of higher education was predominately to educate young ministers on how to best carry on Church intentions. From theological beginning universities evolved to focus on classics such as art and literature. In eras where survival was the top priority for most citizens the privilege of attending college was generally reserved for the very affluent. Members of these elite upper class families were less concerned with their children learning a trade (something often considered unnecessary) but highly interested in their sons becoming gentlemen familiar with Shakespearean verse and Renaissance art. Through his influence at UPenn Ben Franklin played in pivotal role in the direction future institutions of higher learning would take with his practical approach to education.

Today UPenn is one of the largest private universities in America with a student population of well over 30,000. Under graduate students make up two thirds of the total enrollment and participation in an undergrad program that is regularly ranked as one of the top five in …