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Scientists develop detector for investigating the Sun

Scientists develop detector for investigating the sun
Device prototype: (1) the body of the detector consisting of scintillation disks, (2) fiber optics in a protective coating, (3) control boards for managing offset voltage and data acquisition, (4) prototype frame and stand for ground-based observations. Credit: Egor Stadnichuk et al./Journal of Instrumentation

Researchers from MIPT have developed a prototype detector of solar particles. The device is capable of picking up protons at kinetic energies between 10 and 100 megaelectronvolts, and electrons at 1-10 MeV. This covers most of the high-energy particle flux coming from the Sun. The new detector can improve radiation protection for astronauts and spaceships, as well as advancing our understanding of solar flares. The research findings are reported in the Journal of Instrumentation.


As energy gets converted from one form to another in the active regions of the solar atmosphere, streams of particles—or cosmic rays—are born with energies roughly between 0.01-1,000 MeV. Most of these particles are electrons and protons, but nuclei from helium to iron are also observed, albeit in far smaller numbers.

The current consensus is that the particle flux has two principal components. First, there are the narrow streams of electrons in brief flares lasting from tens of minutes to several hours. And then there are the flares with broad shockwaves, which last up to several days and mostly contain protons, with some occasional heavier nuclei.

Despite the vast arrays of data supplied by solar orbiters, some fundamental questions remain unresolved. Scientists do not yet understand the specific mechanisms behind particle acceleration in the shorter- and longer-duration solar flares. It is also unclear what the role of magnetic reconnection is for particles as they accelerate and leave the solar corona, or how and where the initial particle populations originate before accelerating on impact waves. To answer these questions, researchers require particle detectors of a novel type, which would also underlie new spaceship security protocols that would recognize the initial wave of electrons as an early warning of the impending proton radiation hazard.

A recent study by a team of physicists from MIPT and elsewhere reports the creation of a prototype detector of high-energy particles. The device consists of multiple polystyrene disks, connected to photodetectors. As a particle passes through polystyrene, it loses some of its kinetic energy and emits light, which is registered by a silicon photodetector as a signal for subsequent computer analysis.

The project’s principal investigator Alexander Nozik from the Nuclear Physics Methods Laboratory at MIPT said: “The concept of plastic scintillation detectors is not new, and such devices are ubiquitous in Earth-based experiments. What enabled the notable results we achieved is using a segmented detector along with our own mathematical reconstruction methods.”

Part of the paper in the Journal of Instrumentation deals with optimizing the detector segment geometry. The dilemma is that while larger disks mean more particles analyzed at any given time, this comes at the cost of instrument weight, making its delivery into orbit more expensive. Disk resolution also drops as the diameter increases. As

Arizona State University/Halberd Develop Antibody Against Covid-19

JACKSON CENTER, PA / ACCESSWIRE / October 13, 2020 / Halberd Corporation (OTC PINK: HALB ) reported that Arizona State University researchers, utilizing the intellectual property of Halberd Corporation, have successfully generated an anti-Spike protein monoclonal antibody against Covid-19. The Spike Protein is a main component of the Covid-19 virus, and is a crucial component in its ability to replicate. In addition, the researchers have sent for synthesis, genes for the creation of new, unique monoclonal antibodies against the SARS-CoV-2 Spike Protein. The performance has exceeded expectations, and Halberd and ASU intend to file for joint patent protection.

Development continues toward three major potential utilizations of the antibody against the Coronavirus:

William A. Hartman, Halberd Corporation Chairman, President & CEO, stated, “We are very excited about our progress to date and plan to issue regular progress reports to keep the public aware of our significant developments.”

The details of the Halberd-ASU research contract can be viewed here.

For more information please contact:

William A. Hartman

www.halberdcorporation.com

P. O. Box 25

Jackson Center, PA 16133

Twitter: @HalberdC

About Arizona State University.

Arizona State University is a public research university with 5 campuses in and around Phoenix, with four regional centers throughout Arizona. It is one of the largest public universities, based on enrollment, and one of the fastest growing research universities in the United States. The school boasts over 400 National Academies-honored faculty, and 77 elite programs.

About Halberd Corporation.

Halberd Corporation. (OTC PINK: HALB ), is a publicly traded company on the OTC Market, and is in full compliance with OTC Market reporting requirements. Halberd’s Articles of Incorporation prohibit the company from issuance of convertible debt which would result in dilution. See the company’s Articles of Incorporation here. The number of outstanding shares remains at 317,721,539.

The company holds the exclusive rights to the COVID-19 extracorporeal treatment technology provisional patent applications: “Method for Treating and Curing Covid-19 Infection;” “Method for Treating COVID-19 Inflammatory Cytokine Storm for the Reduction of Morbidity and Mortality in COVID-19 Patients;” “Method for Treating and Curing COVID-19 Infection by Utilizing a Laser to Eradicate the Virus”, and, “Nasal Spray To Prevent The Transmission Of Covid-19 Between Humans.” Halberd also holds the exclusive rights to the underlying granted U.S. Patent 9,216,386 and U.S. Patent 8,758,287.

Safe Harbor Notice

Certain statements contained herein are “forward-looking statements” (as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995). The Companies caution that statements, and assumptions made in this news release constitute forward-looking statements and makes no guarantee of future performance. Forward-looking statements are based on estimates and opinions of management at the time statements are made. These statements may address issues that involve significant risks, uncertainties, estimates made by management. Actual results could differ materially from current projections or implied results. The Companies undertake no obligation to revise these statements following the date of this news release.

Investor caution/added risk for investors in companies claiming involvement in COVID-19 initiatives –

On April 8, 2020, SEC Chairman Jay

Iksuda Therapeutics Enters License Agreement With University of Goettingen to Develop a New Generation of Antibody Drug Conjugates

  • Iksuda licenses novel protein-alkylating, tumour-activated pro-drug payload series to develop ADCs with enhanced therapeutic index

  • Development to focus on targets associated with haematological and solid tumours

Iksuda Therapeutics (Iksuda), the developer of enhanced, new-generation of Antibody Drug Conjugates (ADCs), today announces it has executed its option to secure exclusive, worldwide rights to develop a novel class of tumour-activated prodrug payloads from the University of Goettingen, following a successful collaboration exemplifying the series in ADC formats. The highly potent and selective payload series represents a powerful new class within ADC development with novel protein alkylating cytotoxicity. Iksuda will drive onward development and commercialisation, incorporating the tuneable payload series in its ADC pipeline and payload armoury, to create best in class ADC therapeutics for nominated targets associated with haematological and solid tumours with high unmet need.

The partnership with the University of Goettingen was founded on Iksuda’s commitment to expand its payload armoury and optimise ADC design according to target antigen. The programme confirmed the value of tumour-selective activation of these powerful cytotoxic agents, conjugated with Iksuda’s stable conjugation technology (PermaLink®), in widening the therapeutic index of ADCs. The novel protein-alkylating mode-of-action of the payload series differs from the field’s primary focus of intra- or DNA inter-strand cross-linking, conferring benefits against drug resistance mechanisms. Through the combination of PermaLink technology and the protein alkylating prodrugs, the Company aims to enable the differentiated development of more powerful ADCs with improved tumour killing, aligned with improved safety index and an ability to overcome potential tumour resistance.

Iksuda has demonstrated the potential value of prodrug approaches for targeted cancer therapeutics through its recent license of a CD19-targeting ADC from LegoChem Biosciences (“LCB”) for hard-to-treat B-cell cancers, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma. The ADC contains LCB’s prodrug DNA-cross-linking payload, with preclinical data confirming an impressive increase in therapeutic index over comparators. Under a broader agreement, the Company has gained access to LCB’s prodrug payload platform for use in nominated Iksuda targets.

Dr Dave Simpson, PhD, Chief Executive Officer, Iksuda Therapeutics, said: Iksuda’s successful partnership with the University of Goettingen, led by Professor Lutz Tietze, and subsequent licensing agreement demonstrates our continued work in building and refining approaches to ADC development. We are successfully responding to the industry-wide challenge of being able to treat all patients with cancer. Iksuda remains focussed on building a pipeline of next-generation ADCs with improved therapeutic index through our internal and external pipeline, harnessing our deep understanding in the field and accepting the challenge of targeting areas of high unmet clinical need.”

Dr Jens-Peter Horst, PhD, Chief Executive Officer, MBM ScienceBridge, the technology transfer organisation of the University of Goettingen, said: “This agreement is exemplary for the successful transfer of many years of academic research and development work into a very promising and innovative cancer therapy.”

www.iksuda.com

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201013005504/en/

Contacts

Zyme Communications
Lorna Cuddon
Tel: +44 (0) 7811 996 942
lorna.cuddon@zymecommunications.com

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NASA, DHS develop device for finding people under rubble

Researchers performed a test of the Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response (FINDER) prototype technology — which can locate individuals buried in disasters — at the Virginia Task Force 1 Training Facility in Lorton, VA. The device uses radar technology developed at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., to sense the heartbeats and breathing of humans hidden behind piles of rubble. (UPI/DHS/John Price)

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NEC OncoImmunity AS and Oslo University Hospital Team Up to Develop a Diagnostic for COVID-19 Using Artificial Intelligence

NEC OncoImmunity AS (NOI), a subsidiary of NEC Corporation (NEC), and Oslo University Hospital (OUH) are pleased to announce that they have recently been awarded a prestigious grant from the Research Council of Norway (RCN) to develop an artificial intelligence (AI) platform that will enable the rapid design of T-cell diagnostics for emerging or endemic infectious diseases. The project will develop a novel T-cell diagnostic for the current COVID-19 pandemic to complement the current serological tests. This will improve the ability to identify immune responses and acquired immunity, which is desperately needed to deal with the COVID-19 crisis.

Current technologies involve extensive trial and error to define exactly which parts of the pathogen induces robust immunity. These so-called immunodominant epitopes need to be identified for the general population. These demanding, work-intensive and time-consuming steps are necessary to develop tests to monitor the T-cell response to viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 (the infectious virus that causes COVID-19).

Reliable diagnostic tests to identify immune individuals are critical to overcome the ever-looming threat of COVID-19. The AI-based diagnostic to be developed in this project will complement antibody tests and enable individuals who are naturally immune to the virus following infection with SARS-CoV-2 or other seasonal coronaviruses, or who have acquired immunity following vaccination, to be identified.

“Antibody tests are an important aspect of understanding the immune response to the SARS-CoV-2 infection and will remain a mainstay of its diagnosis. However, protective SARS-CoV-2-specific T-cell responses occur in antibody-negative infected individuals who have successfully resolved the infection. In addition, we may already have underlying immunity in the population due to cross reactivity to endemic seasonal human coronaviruses,” said Professor Ludvig A. Munthe Ph.D., Head of Research and Group Leader, Department of Immunology, Oslo University Hospital.

Although the technology to develop antibody diagnostics is readily available, this is not the case for T-cell diagnostics, which currently represents a “blind spot” for the monitoring of immunity to COVID-19 in the world’s population. To address this important gap, NOI and OUH, with the support of RCN, have now committed themselves to develop an AI-designed T-cell diagnostic that monitors the underlying T-cell response to the infection. Developing a reliable T-cell diagnostic comes with specific technological challenges with solutions offered by the NEC Immune Profiler at NOI to cater for the global human population.

“T-cells are known to play a central role for initial and long term immunity against viruses. However, T-cell responses are highly variable between different pathogens and genetic groups in the human population, making the prospect of developing reliable universal T-cell diagnostics for COVID-19 challenging. This challenge has inspired the scientists at NOI to use our AI to seek out the T-cell response to infection as a diagnostic signal. In this project we look forward to adapting the NEC Immune Profiler and other AI technologies at NEC Corporation and leveraging them to develop a COVID-19 T-cell diagnostic for the diverse genetic makeup in the global human population,” said Trevor Clancy Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer, NEC OncoImmunity