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Find a job at 23 Tulsa-area companies and 300 nationwide at virtual career event | Local News



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At the website gethired.anywherecareerfair.com/worktulsa, job seekers can virtually visit the online “booths” of the companies locally and nationally much like the in-person career fairs that the Tulsa World has hosted for years.


Starting Wednesday, local job seekers can connect with 23 Tulsa-area companies and more than 300 employers in 21-states during a Virtual Career Event.

Lee Enterprises, a provider of local news and advertising in 77 markets across the country including the Tulsa World, is hosting the free event that continues until Oct. 25.

At the website tinyurl.com/worktulsa, job seekers can virtually visit the online “booths” of the companies locally and nationally much like the in-person career fairs that the Tulsa World has hosted for years. If job seekers select a booth, they can learn about the company, see all of the open positions and apply to them online. If the employer is signed up to chat online or by video, one can be scheduled.

In addition to browsing the companies involved during the event, job seekers can inquire about any open positions by completing an online form. Interested employers can then ask for resumes.

“The Tulsa World has always been proud of the success we’ve had with our traditional in-person career fairs,” said Kathryn Bezler, Tulsa World Media Company classified manager. “It’s because of this success and experience that we are confident in our ability to deliver the same quality results through our new virtual career fair. We are very excited to be a part of this nationwide event with Lee Enterprises, and believe it will provide even more options for job seekers, as well as candidates for local employers.”

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Astronomers find x-rays lingering years after landmark neutron star collision

UMD astronomers find x-rays lingering years after landmark neutron star collision
Researchers have continuously monitored the radiation emanating from the first (and so far only) cosmic event detected in both gravitational waves and the entire spectrum of light. The neutron star collision detected on August 17, 2017, is seen in this image emanating from galaxy NGC 4993. New analysis provides possible explanations for X-rays that continued to radiate from the collision long after other radiation had faded and way past model predictions. Credit: E. Troja

It’s been three years since the landmark detection of a neutron star merger from gravitational waves. And since that day, an international team of researchers led by University of Maryland astronomer Eleonora Troja has been continuously monitoring the subsequent radiation emissions to provide the most complete picture of such an event.


Their analysis provides possible explanations for X-rays that continued to radiate from the collision long after models predicted they would stop. The study also reveals that current models of neutron stars and compact body collisions are missing important information. The research was published on October 12, 2020, in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

“We are entering a new phase in our understanding of neutron stars,” said Troja, an associate research scientist in UMD’s Department of Astronomy and lead author of the paper. “We really don’t know what to expect from this point forward, because all our models were predicting no X-rays and we were surprised to see them 1,000 days after the collision event was detected. It may take years to find out the answer to what is going on, but our research opens the door to many possibilities.

The neutron star merger that Troja’s team studied—GW170817—was first identified from gravitational waves detected by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory and its counterpart Virgo on August 17, 2017. Within hours, telescopes around the world began observing electromagnetic radiation, including gamma rays and light emitted from the explosion. It was the first and only time astronomers were able to observe the radiation associated with gravity waves, although they long knew such radiation occurs. All other gravity waves observed to date have originated from events too weak and too far away for the radiation to be detected from Earth.

Seconds after GW170817 was detected, scientists recorded the initial jet of energy, known as a gamma ray burst, then the slower kilonova, a cloud of gas which burst forth behind the initial jet. Light from the kilonova lasted about three weeks and then faded. Meanwhile, nine days after the gravity wave was first detected, the telescopes observed something they’d not seen before: X-rays. Scientific models based on known astrophysics predicted that as the initial jet from a neutron star collision moves through interstellar space, it creates its own shockwave, which emits X-rays, radio waves and light. This is known as the afterglow. But such an afterglow had never been observed before. In this case, the afterglow peaked around 160 days after the gravity waves were detected and then rapidly faded away. But the X-rays