Showing: 1 - 3 of 3 RESULTS

Meskwaki Nation, University of Northern Iowa to craft statement noting campus sits on land once home to the tribe

The University of Northern Iowa and members of the Meskwaki Nation are looking seven generations ahead.



a sign on the side of a road: The campus of The University of Northern Iowa sits deserted on Wednesday, April 29, 2020, in Waterloo. All classes at the university through the summer have been moved to online only.


© Brian Powers/The Register
The campus of The University of Northern Iowa sits deserted on Wednesday, April 29, 2020, in Waterloo. All classes at the university through the summer have been moved to online only.

UNI and members of the Meskwaki Nation Tribal Council announced Monday that they are in the process of creating a land stewardship statement acknowledging that the university sits on land that was first home to the Meskwaki Nation, the only federally recognized tribal nation in Iowa.

The statement is among the new initiatives of a university and tribal partnership intended to support Indigenous students, faculty and programming.

In the lead-up to the 2020 election, all eyes are on Iowa. Get updates of all things Iowa politics delivered to your inbox.

The partnership’s goals are guided by a principle common among many Indigenous knowledge systems, which advise that people should consider how descendants seven generations in the future will be affected by decisions made today.

“The university is located on land formerly stewarded by members of the Sac and Fox Tribe of the Meskwaki Nation and other Indigenous tribes. The university acknowledges our responsibility to continue the legacy of stewardship by caring for the land on which the university sits, delivering our mission for the people and communities of Iowa and beyond, and ensuring our actions today lay a strong foundation for generations to come,” reads a statement from Mark Nook, UNI’s president, and Judith Bender, chair of the Meskwaki Tribal Council.

The announcement of the partnership came Monday, which was also Indigenous Peoples’ Day in Iowa.

The Meskwaki people were forced out of present-day Iowa by the U.S. government in the mid-1800s and, except for a handful of people who stayed behind in hiding, were sent to a reservation in Kansas. In 1856, Iowa enacted a law allowing the tribe to remain in the state, and in 1857 the tribe formally bought 80 acres of land in Tama County. The settlement has since grown to include more than 3,000 acres.

UNI has an enrollment of around 9,500 students, 0.1% of whom are Native American or Alaskan Native. The school is in Cedar Falls, which is part of Black Hawk County, a neighbor to Tama County.

UNI administrators and the Meskwaki Tribal Council began conversations in July about ways the two could collaborate, Andrew Morse, an assistant to the president for board and governmental relations at UNI, told the Press-Citizen.

Along with drafting a land stewardship statement, the university is developing scholarships for students from the Meskwaki Settlement School and South Tama High School.

UNI is also creating a program for faculty to work with teachers at the Meskwaki Settlement School, which is on Meskwaki Nation land, to support language and culture programming. The partnership will also drive the reinstatement of a summer camp for Meskwaki youth focused on the transition to higher education.

“It wasn’t that we recognized

ESA’s force-feedback rover controlled from a nation away

ESA’s force-feedback rover controlled from a nation away
A controller in Germany operated ESA’s gripper-equipped Interact rover around a simulated moonscape at the Agency’s technical heart in the Netherlands, to practice retrieving geological samples. Credit: ESA– SJM Photography

A controller in Germany operated ESA’s gripper-equipped Interact rover around a simulated moonscape at the Agency’s technical heart in the Netherlands, to practice retrieving geological samples. At the same time a smaller Germany-based rover interacted with ESA’s rover as if together at the same site—in a dress rehearsal for a robotic test campaign to the Moon-like volcanic slopes of Mount Etna, scheduled for next year.


The scenario behind this week’s testing is that in the future, astronauts aboard the Lunar Gateway in space will be able to operate rovers on the surface of the Moon, using force-feedback controls—like a high-end gaming joystick that pushes back on its user—to experience a realistic sense of touch comparable to actually being there.

The concept was proven in principle during last year’s Analog-1 campaign, undertaken by ESA’s Human Robot Interaction Laboratory, with the support of the DLR German Aerospace Center’s Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen near Munich.

Analog-1 concluded with ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano in orbit aboard the International Space Station operating the Interact rover on the ground, guided by high-fidelity vision and touch to perform a geological sampling exercise.

“Our original plan was to follow up Analog-1 with a genuine geological field survey, on Mount Etna in Italy,” explains ESA robotic engineer Thomas Krueger, heading the HRI Lab.

“This survey was planned as part of DLR’s ARCHES—Autonomous Robotic Networks to Help Modern Societies—initiative, to develop heterogeneous, autonomous and interconnected robotic systems in the context of a real application.”

ESA’s force-feedback rover controlled from a nation away
A controller in Germany operated ESA’s gripper-equipped Interact rover around a simulated moonscape at the Agency’s technical heart in the Netherlands, to practice retrieving geological samples. The rover has two cameras, one mounted on a manoeuvrable arm and the other on the gripper at the end of another arm. Credit: ESA – SJM Photography

“Unfortunately ongoing COVID-19 restrictions make this impossible for now. Instead we had the idea of bringing the rovers together on a virtual basis: we set up a common network infrastructure to make them think they are together even though they are not—like a robotic version of a teleconference—to be a full-scale dress rehearsal for our Mount Etna trip which has now been rescheduled for next summer.”

The test culminated in the Interact rover being jointly operated from DLR more than 660 km away, along with the European Space Operations Centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany, helping to to select and retrieve geological samples—overseeing the activities in ‘space’.

“These kinds of experiments are very important for us to practice and gain operations experience, which is essential for ESA’s future robotic Moon missions,” states ESOC’s operations engineer Thorsten Graber.

Adopting the role of mission control, the ESOC side employed higher-level commanding and visualization tools developed by the Trasys company.

ESA’s force-feedback rover controlled from a nation away
A controller in Germany operated ESA’s gripper-equipped Interact rover around a simulated moonscape

Kyler Murray has career-high 380 yards as Cardinals snap losing streak – NFL Nation

All week there was talk around the Arizona Cardinals that Sunday’s game against the New York Jets was a “must-win.”

For a 2-2 team in early October, it seemed a bit hyperbolic. But for the Cardinals, it wasn’t. They needed to beat the winless Jets, one of the worst teams in football to stay relevant in the brutally tough NFC West and they needed to do it in a convincing fashion to prove they have what it takes to keep chasing a playoff berth this season.

Then second-year quarterback Kyler Murray went to work.

Murray helped the Cardinals (3-2) prevent a three-game winning streak with his arm and legs, throwing for a career-high 380 yards in a 30-10 win against the Jets (0-5), a week after he threw for 133 yards.

He diced apart the Jets’ second with a variety of throws, including a 37-yard touchdown throw to wideout DeAndre Hopkins with 8:35 left in the game that was as beautiful as it was accurate. Of Murray’s 380 yards, 131 went to Hopkins, who had his third 130-yard game as a Cardinal. He didn’t have any last season.

Murray also showed off his touch in the third quarter with a perfectly placed pass to wide receiver Larry Fitzgerald, who hauled it in with one hand.

Murray wasn’t just productive, he was accurate, completing 27 of 37 passes for one touchdown and an interception.

The win keeps Arizona in the hunt for the postseason, including a shot at the NFC West title.

Describe the game in two words: Rebound game. The Cardinals came off two bad losses with a fairly good all-round showing, but Sunday’s game showed there’s still work to be done if Arizona wants to keep the winning going.

Everything you need this week:
Full schedule » | Standings »
• Depth charts for every team »
• Transactions » | Injuries »
• Football Power Index rankings »
More NFL coverage »

Buy/sell on a breakout performance: Buy, buy, buy on Dennis Gardeck’s two sacks in his first defensive snaps of the season. The former undrafted free agent has spent the majority of his first two seasons on special teams, even getting named a Pro Bowl alternate last season. He is a key special teamer but transitioned to outside linebacker this season, and with Chandler Jones leaving the game in the second quarter with a biceps injury and Devon Kennard not playing because of a calf injury, Gardeck got his first defensive playing time Sunday and proved he can be an NFL pass-rusher.

Bold prediction for next week: Running back Chase Edmonds, who continued his tear of playing well at MetLife Stadium with 36 rushing yards and a touchdown and 56 receiving yards, will get more carries on Monday night against the Dallas Cowboys (8:15 p.m. ET, ESPN).

Pivotal play: Murray hit Hopkins along the left sideline for a 45-yard completion with 10:31 left in