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Whoopi Goldberg reveals Paul Simon’s lasting career advice | People



Whoopi Goldberg reveals Paul Simon's lasting career advice

Whoopi Goldberg says Paul Simon once warned her that “a lot of people aren’t going to get you”.

The 64-year-old actress recalled meeting the music star at a party years ago and Simon gave her some lasting career advice, encouraging Whoopi to be herself even if other people perceive her to be “strange”.

Remembering their encounter at the star-studded bash, Whoopi – who is one of only sixteen entertainers to have won an Emmy Award, a Grammy Award, an Academy Award, and a Tony Award – shared: “We had one of the best conversations I’ve ever had … Paul Simon said listen, ‘It’s going to get very fast and a lot is going to happen.'”

The music icon warned Whoopi that her quirks won’t always be understood by some people within the entertainment industry.

However, he also encouraged her not to dilute her personality in search of acceptance.

She recalled him saying to her: “I just want to tell you a lot of people aren’t going to get you, you will be strange to them.”

Since 2007, Whoopi has been co-hosting the talk show ‘The View’, and she’s admitted to loving her time on the program.

The actress – who starred in ‘The Color Purple’ and ‘Sister Act’ – relishes sharing the screen with so many opinionated, passionate co-presenters.

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Whoopi Goldberg reveals Paul Simon’s lasting career advice



a man wearing sunglasses posing for the camera: Whoopi Goldberg


© Bang Showbiz
Whoopi Goldberg

Whoopi Goldberg says Paul Simon once warned her that “a lot of people aren’t going to get you”.

The 64-year-old actress recalled meeting the music star at a party years ago and Simon gave her some lasting career advice, encouraging Whoopi to be herself even if other people perceive her to be “strange”.

Remembering their encounter at the star-studded bash, Whoopi – who is one of only sixteen entertainers to have won an Emmy Award, a Grammy Award, an Academy Award, and a Tony Award – shared: “We had one of the best conversations I’ve ever had … Paul Simon said listen, ‘It’s going to get very fast and a lot is going to happen.'”

The music icon warned Whoopi that her quirks won’t always be understood by some people within the entertainment industry.

However, he also encouraged her not to dilute her personality in search of acceptance.

She recalled him saying to her: “I just want to tell you a lot of people aren’t going to get you, you will be strange to them.”

Since 2007, Whoopi has been co-hosting the talk show ‘The View’, and she’s admitted to loving her time on the programme.

The actress – who starred in ‘The Color Purple’ and ‘Sister Act’ – relishes sharing the screen with so many opinionated, passionate co-presenters.

Speaking to Naomi Campbell’s ‘No Filter with Naomi’ YouTube channel about her co-presenters, Whoopi said: “You have five different personalities, five different ways of thinking, five different ways of delivering and everyone has their borders … you don’t want to make it personal … real friends don’t make it personal unless they’re looking for a [real] fight.”

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Nobel Prize in Economics awarded to Paul Milgrom and Robert B Wilson of Stanford University

“Their discoveries have benefited sellers, buyers and taxpayers around the world,” the prize committee said.

The two men will receive a cash award of 10 million Swedish kronor, worth a bit more than $1.1 million.

Today’s announcement comes as the global economy is battling to emerge from a painful recession caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The International Monetary Fund expects “a partial and uneven recovery” next year. Finance ministers and central bank chiefs from 189 member nations will gather virtually this week for the annual meetings of the fund and its sister institution, the World Bank.

Last year, a trio of economists shared the prize, which they received in recognition of their pioneering work developing new methods to fight global poverty. Abhijit Banerjee and Esther Duflo, both from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Michael Kremer of Harvard University were honored for practical research insights that the academy said had “considerably improved our ability to fight global poverty.”

Duflo, at 46, was the youngest person to receive the economics prize and just the second woman to do so in its first half-century of existence.

Before today, a total of 84 laureates had received the prize, known formally as The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel.

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Paul Johnson For Princeton Board Of Education

PRINCETON, NJ — A lifelong Princeton resident, Paul Johnson says he’s running for a seat in the Board of Education because he genuinely cares “about the outcome of my five children, three of whom attend Princeton Public Schools, as well as all the children in our community.”

A student-athlete coach, Johnson is running with Karen Lemon and William “Bill” Hare as a slate.

Read below to learn more about Johnson and his platform for the upcoming elections in Princeton.

Name – Paul Johnson

Age (as of Election Day) – 36

Position Sought – Board of Education Does anyone in your family work in politics or government? No

Education –

BA Anthropology, University of Virginia.

Occupation –

Student-athlete coach and mentor

Previous or Current Elected or Appointed Office – None

Campaign website –

www.jlhforboe.com

Why are you seeking elective office?

As the late, great John Lewis so eloquently put it, “To get in trouble, good trouble, necessary trouble.” We are at a crossroads in our society and we must be proactive rather than reactive. It is time for a change on our school Board, it is time we tackle our issues of equity/equality head on, without reserve. It is time for us to be honest with ourselves and admit we have fallen short of the promises we have made to our children in this town. We have failed to be leaders for social justice and reform. We have failed to have open and honest dialogue with our families and our community. I am running because I believe I can be part of the necessary change which will ensure our students and families a better tomorrow. I am running because I genuinely care about the outcome of my five children, three of whom attend Princeton Public Schools (grades 3, 5 and 11) as well as all the children in our community. Most importantly I will work tirelessly until every kid and every family in our town feels like they belong. I will make sure our schools remain diverse, our town remains affordable, and there will forever be trust and transparency between the Board and the public.

The single most pressing issue facing our community is _______, and this is what I intend to do about it.

The top priority is the issue of equity. It was and has always been the pandemic before the pandemic we call Covid-19. We must always begin with acknowledging that this is much bigger than a black-white issue, or a have vs have-not issue. It is an issue of humanity, an issue of moral code, and most importantly, an issue of self-preservation of the human race. It stretches far beyond the electives and a few online courses of racial literacy. It is that which binds us and ensures that every child can achieve their full potential and know they are loved. It is that driving force that allows our children to know their worth and that we value them. If elected, I believe it is

Camera Designed by Felix & Paul Studios and TIME Arrives at ISS to Capture First-Ever Virtual Reality Spacewalk

It’s entirely possible you missed it, but on Oct. 2 at 9:16 PM ET, you lifted off for the International Space Station. Just over two days later, you docked successfully—and it’s a good thing you did. You’ve got a spacewalk planned for later this year.

O.K., technically speaking, you didn’t go anywhere at all, and unless you’re actually a highly-trained astronaut, you certainly shouldn’t be planning for a real-deal spacewalk—or extravehicular activity (EVA)—any time soon. But you could very much share in the experience when actual ISS crew members venture outside of the station for one of the most exciting and dangerous experiences an astronaut can have.

That’s because something special was included among the ISS-bound cargo on the uncrewed Cygnus supply vehicle that took off from Wallops Island, Va. earlier this week: the first-ever 3D, virtual reality camera designed to operate in the vacuum of space. It’s the product of a partnership between the Montreal-based Felix & Paul Studios (an Emmy Award-winning creator of immersive entertainment experiences), TIME Studios (TIME’s Emmy Award-winning television and film division) and Nanoracks (the leading provider of commercial space access).

This photograph was taken inside the mobile clean room attached to Northrop Grumman's Antares rocket as it rests atop Pad 0A at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops, Island, Va. on Sept. 28, 2020. Mechanical Technician Stephen Busch, left, and Jennie Wang, Lead Integration and Test Mechanical Engineer for Northrop Grumman, load the cargo bag containing the Space Camera through the hatch of the Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module. The vehicle successfully docked with the International Space Station on October 5. <span class="copyright">Philip Andrews—for TIME</span>
This photograph was taken inside the mobile clean room attached to Northrop Grumman’s Antares rocket as it rests atop Pad 0A at NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops, Island, Va. on Sept. 28, 2020. Mechanical Technician Stephen Busch, left, and Jennie Wang, Lead Integration and Test Mechanical Engineer for Northrop Grumman, load the cargo bag containing the Space Camera through the hatch of the Cygnus Pressurized Cargo Module. The vehicle successfully docked with the International Space Station on October 5. Philip Andrews—for TIME

The new camera is not the first one TIME, Felix & Paul and Nanoracks have sent to the ISS. In 2016, TIME and Felix & Paul were independently exploring the possibility of such a project, and ultimately decided to collaborate rather than compete. The decision bore fruit when, just two years later when we launched a camera built to operate inside the ISS. It’s been shooting scenes of station life for TIME’s The ISS Experience, set for release on Oct. 22 for virtual reality headsets via the Oculus Store. The episodes will also be available later in the fall in select domes and planetariums around the country, and in 360° mobile format through 5G-enabled wireless carriers.

Designing a multi-lens camera that could shoot in 3D and VR and function in the microgravity of low-Earth orbit was challenge enough. Designing one that can function in the extreme environment outside the ship—where temperatures fluctuate from 121º C (250º F) to -156º C (-250º F), and where 16 sunrises and sunsets a day can produce extreme flaring on the camera’s lenses—was an order of magnitude harder.

The camera was hardened by Nanoracks to withstand not only the temperature variations and the solar flaring, but also ultraviolet radiation, charged particle (ionizing) radiation, plasma, surface charging and arcing, and impacts from micrometeoroids and orbital debris. “This may well be one of the most