Showing: 1 - 9 of 9 RESULTS

Bubble Machine Demonstrates Artificial Pollination [Video]

Japanese researchers have attached a bubble machine to a drone to show how artificial pollination could work.

About three-fourths of the world’s crops depend on insect pollination to reproduce. However, due to climate change and the widespread use of pesticides, bee and other pollinator numbers are declining worldwide. Some countries report annual beehive losses of 30% or higher.

Due to this scarcity, many U.S. farmers have resorted to trucking bees around the country when pollinators are needed. Scientists warn about what this could mean for the future of our food supply. Japanese researchers, however, say they might have a solution and it involves blowing soap bubbles.

Researchers created a light bubble solution that was able to suspend both natural pollen grains and a germination solution. When researchers used that solution in a bubble gun, they achieved a 95% pollination rate in a pear orchard — the same as if done by hand. In a more controlled setting, researchers attached a bubble machine to a drone to prove the method could work fully autonomously.

Although this method seems promising, researchers acknowledge that it cannot totally replace bees and they recognize the limitations of their concept. They are looking into eco-friendlier soaps and ways to render the next step, an autonomous drone that pollinates an entire field, more efficient.

Producer & Writer Andrew Johnson

Researcher & Copy Editor Kate Williams

Production Manager Kelsey Williams

Supervising Producer Tim Ahern This video “Bubble Machine Demonstrates Artificial Pollination”, first appeared on https://nowthisnews.com.

Source Article

Rare Peacock Stars Could Potentially Detonate Deadly Gamma Rays In The Milky Way [Video]

KEY POINTS

  • Gamma-ray bursts are one of the most energetic occurrences in the universe
  • Apep’s two stars are 10 to 15 times more massive and 100,000 times brighter than the Sun
  • The two stars also orbit each other about every 125 years

Apep, one of the Wolf-Rayets binary star systems dubbed as the “exotic peacocks of the stellar world” discovered in 2018, was found to have the capacity to detonate long gamma ray bursts that are potentially deadly. If it detonates, the explosion could be something never seen in the Milky Way before, according to scientists.

“As well as exhibiting all the usual extreme behavior of Wolf-Rayets, Apep’s main star looks to be rapidly rotating. This means it could have all the ingredients to detonate a long gamma-ray burst when it goes supernova,” Peter Tuthill, study lead and professor from the University of Sydney, said in a press release. 

In the study published in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the team explained that gamma-ray bursts are one of the most energetic occurrences in the universe, adding that “they are potentially deadly.” 

If the detonation happens on Earth, for instance, the explosion can destroy the ozone layer, exposing everyone and everything to the sun’s ultraviolet radiation. The scientists clarify that Apep’s axis of rotation is far from Earth and won’t affect humans when an explosion happens in the future.  

Apep, a binary star system that is 8,000 light-years from Earth, was classified as a Wolf-Rayet two years ago. Being categorized as a Wolf-Rayet is already rare. Only a handful of stars made the cut to be categorized as one. Their temperatures are so hot that they collapse in a supernova explosion faster than the ordinary stars.   

In the case of Apep, it is also recognized as one of the rarest Wolf-Rayets being an elegant binary pair orbiting one another. Their orbit shapes into a glowing whirlpool that resembles a sooty tail. 

Aside from Apep potentially harboring deadly long gamma rays, the scientists also found that the two stars are both 10 to 15 times more massive than the Sun. Apep is also more than 100,000 times brighter than the Sun. 

The team also found that Apep stars orbit each other about every 125 years. By estimates, they are orbiting at a distance the same size of the whole solar system. 

Apep is also producing stellar winds with speeds that could only be described as “mind-blowing.”

“They are spinning off the stars about 12 million kilometers (7 million miles) an hour; that’s 1% the speed of light. Yet the dust being produced by this system is expanding much more slowly, at about a quarter of the stellar wind speed,” Yinuo Han, a University of Sydney’s student who participated in the new research on Apep, said in the same press release. 

Han noted that the only explanation they have of Apep’s stellar wind speed is the fast rotating ability of the stars. He, however, acknowledged the team hasn’t quite added

Unprecedented Tidal Disruption Shown In Artistic Animation [Video]

KEY POINTS

  • Tidal disruption involves death by spaghettification of a nearby star to a black hole
  • Spaghettification  occurs when a star is devoured by a black hole
  • Astronomers can now better understand how supermassive black holes behave

The last moments of a star dying by spaghettification have been demonstrated in an artistic animation as scientists made a recording of what happens when a black hole rips a star apart when it gets too close. The phenomenon happened just 215 million light-years from Earth, making the scientists’ observation unprecedented.  

By using the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope and New Technology Telescope, the Las Cumbres Observatory global telescope network and the Neil Gehrels Swift Satellite, a team of scientists was able to record a phenomenon called tidal disruption event. 

In a study published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, the team explained that tidal disruption involves death by spaghettification of a nearby star.  Spaghettification occurs when a star is shredded by extreme gravitational pull after getting too close to the black hole. When the star dies it releases a bright flare of energy that is previously undetected because of a curtain of dust and debris obscuring the view. 

For their study, however, the team of scientists was able to witness the tidal disruption in unprecedented detail when they caught it just a short time after the star was ripped apart. They, therefore, saw how the black hole launched a powerful outflow of materials moving with velocities of up to 10,000 kilometers per square or more than 6,200 miles. Since they witnessed the occurrence just before the curtain of dust and debris blocked their views, their finding became the “closest flare of its kind yet recorded.”

“We were able to investigate in detail what happens when a star is eaten by such a monster,” Dr. Matt Nicholl, a lecturer and Royal Astronomical Society research fellow at the University of Birmingham, said in a press release.  

The study became significant in helping astronomers to better grasp how supermassive blackholes behave and how their extreme gravitational pull affects matters surrounding them. 

“The observations showed that the star had roughly the same mass as our own Sun and that it lost about half of that to the black hole, which is over a million times more massive,” Nicholl said in the same press release. 

A handout photo provided by the European Southern Observatory on April 10, 2019 shows the first photograph of a black hole and its fiery halo -- touted as the "most direct proof of their existence" by one of the project's lead scientists A handout photo provided by the European Southern Observatory on April 10, 2019 shows the first photograph of a black hole and its fiery halo — touted as the “most direct proof of their existence” by one of the project’s lead scientists Photo: EUROPEAN SOUTHERN OBSERVATORY / –

Source Article

President Obama’s White House photographer breaks down his photojournalism career (video)

Pete Souza, American photojournalist and former Chief Official White House Photographer for U.S. Presidents Barack Obama and Ronald Reagan, takes us through his illustrious career. From capturing Reagan’s reaction to Space Shuttle Challenger’s explosion to photographing President Obama’s Cabinet in the situation room during the raid on Bin Laden, Pete breaks down some of his most iconic images. ‘The Way I See It’ is in theaters now and will be broadcasted on MSNBC beginning this Friday, October 16th. See the complete video here.

Explore other recent videos from our content partners at Conde Nast.

Food experts answer your questions about pancakes | pizza | mashed potatoes | fried chicken | grilled cheese | lasagna | french fries | steak | mac and cheese

What’s the most haunted place in Ohio?

Tour a $78M mountain retreat with its own climbing wall

Dolly Parton answers questions about her from the internet

Tour Rainn Wilson’s SoCal home

How to make almost every kind of coffee drink

Take a tour of Hilary Duff’s family home

Learn British royal slang from the cast of ‘The Crown’

Elle Fanning explains Georgia slang

Alicia Keys watches fan covers of her songs

Actors break down their career highlights: Jim Parsons | Joseph Gordon-Levitt | Seth Green | Simon Pegg | Anna Kendrick | Kristen Bell | Mark Wahlberg | Martin Freeman | Anthony Mackie | Harrison Ford

Mayim Bialik answers neuroscience questions

Tips to improve your grilled fish recipes | veggie burgers | chocolate cake | fish & chips

Gabrielle Union and Jessica Alba break down a day on the set of their show

Alicia Silverstone dishes on her iconic outfit from ‘Clueless’

Kendall Jenner gives you a tour of her home

Tour Scottie Pippen’s Chicago mansion

Is Ohio the most polite state?

Source Article

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Talk With Malala | Video

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry celebrated International Day of the Girl on Oct. 11 with an exemplary young leader, Malala Yousafzai. The Duke and Duchess of Sussex had a virtual chat with Malala to emphasize the need for equal education worldwide and bring attention to the lack of opportunities for girls specifically.

As the group discussed, there are “barriers preventing 130 million girls from going to school,” with the potential to inhibit even more as a result of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. “When young girls have access to education, everyone wins and everyone succeeds. It just opens the door for societal success at the highest level,” Meghan said, explaining why it’s essential for people to pay attention to this issue.

Malala, a recent university graduate herself, elaborated on the dangers that can befall girls who don’t engage in active schooling. “An additional 20 million more girls are at risk of dropping out of school because of this pandemic,” she told Harry and Meghan. “They’re at risk of never being able to return to their schools because they are likely to be pushed into early child marriages or they might become the breadwinners or financial supporters of their families.”

Meghan responded: “It’s not just robbing a society of the cultural richness that comes with educating young girls. It’s also robbing these young girls of childhood.” Harry agreed and noted that education for girls also goes hand in hand with combating climate change. “The importance of girls’ education to help defer climate change is absolutely critical,” he said. “An education provides money, provides an income, which makes you less susceptible to disaster.” Watch the inspiring and important conversation in full above.

Source Article

The biggest video board in college football is operational, decorative covering to be finished by Oregon’s season opener

EUGENE — The biggest video board in college football is operational.

Oregon’s new mammoth video board and sound system are installed at Autzen Stadium and the decorative coverings are expected to be added to the $12 million project in time for the Nov. 7 season opener against Stanford.

UO athletic director Rob Mullens gave an update on the project, which was approved the the school’s board of directors in March and was supposed to be completed in time for the original season opener on Sept. 5, during an interview on The James Crepea Show on Friday.

“It’s awesome,” Mullens said. “It’s going to be fantastic. It’s been fully operational for a while, both the sound and the video and fans are going to love it. We’re so pleased to finally get to his project because the fan feedback that we get after every game, this has been at the top of the agenda for several years, particularly the sound, now that we’re able to add some modern video with it.

“It would have been fully operational for the first game. What they’re finishing up is the decorative cladding. We probably would’ve been really tight to get all that done before the first game. Obviously when the Pac-12 pivoted to postpone football (on Aug. 11) we weren’t pushing as hard on the overtime hours and around the clock. Just like a lot of things that happened, there were some manufacturing challenges with some of the decorative cladding. Again, the board was fully operational with sound. We would’ve been close on that first game, but fortunately it will be ready will all the decorative cladding by the time we do open on Nov. 7.”

The 12,276-square foot addition to the East end zone of Autzen Stadium also features a 47′ x 26′ video board facing outside the stadium.

Source Article

NASA drops joyful Jupiter flyover video from Juno’s perspective

Take a moment to bask in the beauty of a Jupiter flyover.


NASA/Kevin Gill; video screenshot by Amanda Kooser/CNET

No Earth roller coaster could possibly compare to a 130,000 mph (209,000 kph) flyover of Jupiter. That’s what NASA’s Juno spacecraft experienced in June with a close pass of the gas giant. 

A striking new NASA video re-creates the scenery from this thrilling space adventure.

Citizen Scientist Kevin Gill, who also works as a software engineer at NASA, harnessed data from Juno’s JunoCam, the camera that’s been delivering lavish views of Jupiter since the spacecraft arrived at the planet in 2016.

“The sequence combines 41 JunoCam still images digitally projected onto a sphere, with a virtual ‘camera’ providing views of Jupiter from different angles as the spacecraft speeds by,” said NASA in a statement on Thursday.

The video is accompanied by an appropriately epic and lush soundtrack. The images come from Juno’s June 2, 2020, flyover — its 27th close flyby of the planet — where it skimmed to within 2,100 miles (3,400 kilometers) of the clouds. 

The Juno video offers a nice counterpoint to a recent Hubble Space Telescope portrait of Jupiter. It’s the short and the long of it. Any way you look at it, Jupiter is a delight to behold. 

Source Article

This one-minute video from Brown University charts the devastating course of the coronavirus pandemic

Programming note: There will be no Rhode Map on Monday because it’s a holiday, but we’ll be back in your inbox Tuesday morning.

ICYMI: Rhode Island was up to 26,045 confirmed coronavirus cases on Wednesday, after adding 182 new cases. The most recent overall daily test-positive rate was 1.8 percent, but the first-time positive rate was 6.3 percent. The state announced one more death, bringing the total to 1,127. There were 117 people in the hospital, 12 were in intensive care, and six were on ventilators.

We’re now into the eighth month of the pandemic, and it has been easy to become numb to the daily news about new infections, and sadly, the death toll. Now there’s real concern that cases are beginning to tick up again.

So how has the virus spread across the country since March?

Brown University School of Public Health Dean Dr. Ashish Jha and his team have created a simple and helpful time-lapse video that breaks down the rate of cases per 100,000 for the US since March 1.

It’s worth taking a minute (literally) to watch this.

THE GLOBE IN RHODE ISLAND

⚓ House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello testified that he was ticked off when he first saw a 2016 campaign mailer in which a Republican endorsed him, but he acknowledged that he paid political operative Jeff Britt a bonus when he won the race and then tried to hire Britt again two years later. Britt is on trial for a money laundering charge in connection with that mailer.

⚓ The Bruins selected Riley Duran in the NHL Draft, but you could first seem him playing at Providence College in 2021. Two other PC players were drafted as well.

⚓ Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island president and CEO Kim Keck is getting a big promotion as she will take over the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association beginning in January. The local organization is going to hold a national search to find her successor.

⚓ Rhode Map readers have sent another round of Happy Birthday wishes to: Annie Lou Montague (99), Ava Marie Barnes (1), Travis Escobar (30), David Klepper, Elaine Coderre, Ben Chester (25), Meg Griffiths (39), Robert Salter, Darrell West, Fay Parenteau (79), Ken Block, Shirley Booth (90), Henry Dennen (17), Francesca Malerba (forever 24), Donna Cardi (67), Brian Nelson (47), Brad Dufault, Donna Cronin (76), Julia Irene Iafrate (16), Nicholas Gregory Iafrate (4), Providence Councilwoman Rachel Miller, Maura Nugent Martinelli (40), Lisa Ranglin, Christine Drumm (60), Henry Adams (21), Frank O’Donnell, Rob Hogan, Molly Kate Donnelly, Jake Scearbo, Peter McWalters, Stephen Graham, and Doreen Costa.

MORE ON BOSTONGLOBE.COM

Health: Here’s a helpful guide to the antibody cocktail President Trump received to treat the coronavirus.

Fun: It’s spooky season, but how do you do Salem in a pandemic? We’ve got everything you need to know.

Sports: We know the Patriots’

Jim Parsons breaks down his career from ‘Big Bang Theory’ to ‘Young Sheldon’ (video)

Jim Parsons sits down with Vanity Fair to take us through his legendary acting career, breaking down his roles in ‘Ed,’ ‘Garden State,’ ‘The Big Bang Theory,’ ‘Home,’ ‘Young Sheldon,’ ‘A Kid Like Jake,’ ‘Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile,’ ‘Hollywood’ and ‘The Boys in the Band.’ Check out the complete video here and see prior celebrity career retrospectives below.

Actors break down their career highlights: Joseph Gordon-Levitt | Seth Green | Simon Pegg | Anna Kendrick | Kristen Bell | Mark Wahlberg | Martin Freeman | Anthony Mackie | Harrison Ford

Explore other recent videos from our content partners at Conde Nast.

Food experts answer your questions about pancakes | pizza | mashed potatoes | fried chicken | grilled cheese | lasagna | french fries | steak | mac and cheese

Dolly Parton answers questions about her from the internet

Tour Rainn Wilson’s SoCal home

Is Ohio the most polite state?

How to make almost every kind of coffee drink

Take a tour of Hilary Duff’s family home

Learn British royal slang from the cast of ‘The Crown’

Elle Fanning explains Georgia slang

Alicia Keys watches fan covers of her songs

Researcher debunks ocean myths

Mayim Bialik answers the most-searched questions about herself

Mayim Bialik answers neuroscience questions

Tips to improve your grilled fish recipes | veggie burgers | chocolate cake | fish & chips

Gabrielle Union and Jessica Alba break down a day on the set of their show

Alicia Silverstone dishes on her iconic outfit from ‘Clueless’

Kendall Jenner gives you a tour of her home

Tour Scottie Pippen’s Chicago mansion

Source Article